ICC T20I Championship

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This article is about the ranking scheme. It is not to be confused with ICC World Twenty20.
ICC T20I Championship
Mrf-rankings-logo.png
ICC T20 Championship logo
Administrator International Cricket Council
Format Twenty20 International
First tournament 2007
Last tournament ongoing
Tournament format notional (ongoing points
accumulation through
all matches played)
Number of teams 17
Current champion  New Zealand (132 rating)
Most successful  Sri Lanka (35 months)

The ICC T20 Championship is an international Twenty20 cricket competition run by the International Cricket Council. The competition is notional in that it is simply a ranking scheme overlaid on the regular T20I match schedule.[1] After every T20I match, the two teams involved receive points based on a mathematical formula. The total of each team's points total is divided by the total number of matches to give a rating, and all teams are ranked on a table in order of rating.[2]

Currently, New Zealand leads the ICC T20I Championship.

Qualification[edit]

According to the ICC website, "Only teams who have completed at least eight T20 international matches since 1st August between three and four years ago will have their rating above converted into a ranking on the main table." [3]

Points calculations[edit]

Time period[edit]

Each team scores points based on the results of their matches over the last 3−4 years − all matches played in the 12–24 months since the May before last, plus all the matches played in the 24 months before that, for which the matches played and points earned both count half.[4] Each May, the matches and points earned between 3 and 4 years ago are removed, and the matches and points earned between 1 and 2 years ago switch from 100% weighting to 50% weighting. For example, at May 2014, the matches played between May 2010 and May 2011 were removed, and the matches played between May 2012 and May 2013 switched to 50% weighting (the matches from May 2011 to April 2012 would have already been at 50% following the previous rerating). This happens overnight, so can result in teams changing positions in the ranking table despite not playing. ICC Test Championship weightings

Find the points earned from a match[edit]

Each time two teams play another match, the rankings table is updated as follows, based on the ratings of the teams immediately before they played. To determine the teams' new ratings after a particular match, first calculate the points earned from the match:

If the gap between the ratings of the two teams before the match was less than 40 points, then:

Match result Points earned
Win Opponent's rating + 50
Tie Opponent's rating
Lose Opponent's rating − 50

If the gap between the ratings of the two teams before the match was at least 40 points, then:

Match result Points earned
Stronger team wins Own rating + 10
Weaker team loses Own rating − 10
Stronger team ties Own rating − 40
Weaker team ties Own rating + 40
Stronger team loses Own rating − 90
Weaker team wins Own rating + 90

Example[edit]

Suppose Team A, with an initial rating of 100, plays Team B. The table shows the points awarded to the two teams for 9 different initial ratings for B (ranging from 20 to 160), and the three possible match results.

Initial ratings Scenario Team A wins & Team B loses.
Points earned:
Match tied.
Points earned:
Team A loses & Team B wins. Points earned: Total initial ratings Total points earned (All 3 results)
Team A Team B Team A Team B Team A Team B Team A Team B
100 20 Initial ratings at least 40 points apart Stronger team wins: Own rating + 10 110 Weaker team loses: Own rating − 10 10 Stronger team ties: Own rating − 40 60 Weaker team ties: Own rating + 40 60 Stronger team loses: Own rating − 90 10 Weaker team wins: Own rating + 90 110 120 120
100 40 110 30 60 80 10 130 140 140
100 60 110 50 60 100 10 150 160 160
100 70 Initial ratings less than 40 points apart Win: Opponent's rating + 50 120 Lose: Opponent's rating − 50 50 Tie: Opponent's rating 70 Tie: Opponent's rating 100 Lose: Opponent's rating − 50 20 Win: Opponent's rating + 50 150 170 170
100 90 140 50 90 100 40 150 190 190
100 110 160 50 110 100 60 150 210 210
100 130 180 50 130 100 80 150 230 230
100 140 Initial ratings at least 40 points apart Weaker team wins: Own rating + 90 190 Stronger team loses: Own rating − 90 50 Weaker team ties: Own rating + 40 140 Stronger team ties: Own rating − 40 100 Weaker team loses: Own rating − 10 90 Stronger team wins: Own rating + 10 150 240 240
100 160 190 70 140 120 90 170 260 260

This illustrates that:

  • The winning team earns more points than the losing team. (Unless the ratings are more than 180 apart and the weaker team wins − highly unlikely.)
  • Winning always earns a team 100 points more than losing, and 50 more than tieing.
  • The total points earned by the two teams is always the same as the total initial ratings of the two teams.
  • The points earned by a winning team increases as the initial rating (quality) of the opposition increases, within the constraints of earning at least its own initial rating + 10, and no more than its own initial rating + 90. A winning team therefore always earns more points than its initial rating, increasing its overall average rating.
  • The points earned by a losing team increases as the initial rating (quality) of the opposition increases, within the constraints of earning at least its own initial rating − 90, and no more than its own initial rating − 10. A losing team therefore always earns fewer points than its initial rating, decreasing its overall average rating.
  • In a tie, the weaker team usually earns more points than the stronger team (unless the initial ratings are at least 80 apart), reflecting the fact that a tie is a better result for the weaker team than the stronger team. Also, the stronger team will earn fewer points than its initial rating, decreasing its average, and the weaker team more points that its initial rating, increasing its average.
  • For a given result, the rule of how the two teams' points are calculated changes as the initial ratings change, from being based on teams' own ratings when one team is far stronger, to being based on the opponent's ratings when the teams are closely matched, back to being based on own ratings when the other team is far stronger. However, despite these sudden changes in the rule, the number of points awarded for each result changes smoothly as the initial ratings change.

Find the new ratings[edit]

  • Each team's rating is equal to its total points scored divided by the total matches played. (Series are not significant in these calculations).
  • Add the match points scored to the points already scored (in previous matches as reflected by the table), add one to the number of matches played, and determine the new rating.
  • Points earned by teams depend on the opponent's ratings, therefore this system needed to assign base ratings to teams when it started.

Current rankings[edit]

ICC T20I Championship
Rank Team Matches Points Rating
1  New Zealand 20 2635 132
2  India 26 3284 126
3  South Africa 23 2734 119
4  West Indies 21 2486 118
5  Australia 21 2390 114
6  England 22 2481 113
7  Pakistan 31 3436 111
8  Sri Lanka 28 2630 94
9  Afghanistan 22 1725 78
10  Bangladesh 23 1708 74
11  Netherlands 10 667 67
12  Zimbabwe 22 1358 62
13  Scotland 11 622 57
14  United Arab Emirates 14 757 54
15  Ireland 12 505 42
16  Oman 12 442 37
17  Hong Kong 16 538 34
Insufficient matches
 Papua New Guinea 5 44
Reference: ICC Rankings, 28 September 2016
"Matches" is the number of matches played in the 12-24 months since the May before last, plus half the number in the 24 months before that.

Historical ICC T20I Champions[edit]

This table lists the teams that have successively held the highest rating since the T20I ranking was introduced.[citation needed]

Country Start End Duration Cumulative Highest Rating
 England 24 October 2011 8 August 2012 [5] 9 months 9 months 140
 South Africa 8 August 2012 11 September 2012 1 month 1 month 137
 England 12 September 2012 21 September 2012 10 days 10 months 130
 South Africa 22 September 2012 28 September 2012 7 days 1 month 134
 Sri Lanka 29 September 2012 28 March 2014 18 months 18 months 134
 India 28 March 2014 3 April 2014 6 days 6 days 130
 Sri Lanka 3 April 2014 4 April 2014 1 day 18 months 131
 India 4 April 2014 6 April 2014 2 days 8 days 132
 Sri Lanka 6 April 2014 1 May 2014 1 month 19 months 133
 India 1 May 2014 7 September 2014 4 months 4 months 131
 Sri Lanka 7 September 2014 10 January 2016 16 months 35 months 135
 West Indies 10 January 2016 31 January 2016 21 days 21 days 118
 India 31 January 2016 9 February 2016 9 days 5 months 120
 Sri Lanka 9 February 2016 12 February 2016 3 days 35 months 121
 India 12 February 2016 3 May 2016 2.5 months 8 months 127
 New Zealand 4 May 2016 Current 132

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Twenty20 rankings launched with England on top". Retrieved 24 October 2011. 
  2. ^ "David Richardson previews the release of the Reliance ICC T20I Rankings". Retrieved 24 October 2011. 
  3. ^ "ICC rankings for Tests, ODIs and Twenty20". Retrieved 5 January 2015. 
  4. ^ "FAQs on ICC T20I Team Rankings". Qn4,5, ICC. Retrieved 2016-03-16. 
  5. ^ "England rise to No.1 in ODIs". ESPNcricinfo. 

External links[edit]