ICC World Twenty20 Qualifier

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ICC World Twenty20 Qualifier
Administrator International Cricket Council
Format Twenty20, Twenty20 International
First tournament 2008 Ireland
Tournament format Group stage, playoffs
Current champion  Netherlands (2nd title)
 Scotland (1st title) (shared)
Most successful  Ireland (3 titles)
Most runs Afghanistan Mohammad Shahzad (895)
Most wickets Netherlands Mudassar Bukhari (39)
Website ICC WT20 Qualifier Official website

The ICC World Twenty20 Qualifier is an international Twenty20 cricket tournament run under the auspices of the International Cricket Council. The tournament serves as the final qualifying event for the ICC World Twenty20 for associate and affiliate members. The first edition was held in 2008, with only six teams. This was increased to eight teams for the 2010 tournament and to 16 teams for the 2012 and 2013 editions, but reduced to 14 for the 2015 edition. Currently, the top six finishers in the qualifier move on to the ICC World Twenty20 tournament. Ireland are the most successful team, having won three tournaments (including one shared with the Netherlands) and qualified for the World Twenty20 on every occasion the tournament has been played.

History[edit]

2008 Qualifiers[edit]

The first ever Twenty20 World Cup Qualifier was played as a Qualifier for 2009 ICC World Twenty20 and was played between 2 August and 5 August 2008 in Stormont, Belfast in Northern Ireland. The top three [1] played in the 2009 ICC World Twenty20, the international championship of Twenty20 cricket. The six competing teams were:

The competition was won by Ireland and the Netherlands, who shared the trophy after rain forced the final to be abandoned without a ball bowled. Both teams qualified for the 2009 ICC World Twenty20 finals in England. After the withdrawal of Zimbabwe from the competition, the two finalists were joined by third-placed Scotland.

2010 Qualifiers[edit]

The ICC World Twenty20 Qualifier 2010 was played from February 9–13, 2010[2] in the United Arab Emirates. It was expanded to eight teams, as Afghanistan, the United Arab Emirates, and the United States entered the tournament for the first time, whereas Bermuda did not enter.

The eight competing teams were:[3]

Afghanistan defeated Ireland in the final to win the championship, and both teams progressed to play in the 2010 ICC World Twenty20, the international championship of Twenty20 cricket in the West Indies.

2012 Qualifiers[edit]

The 2012 ICC World Twenty20 Qualifier was played in early 2012. It was an expanded version comprising ten qualifiers from regional Twenty20 tournaments in addition to the six ODI/Twenty20 status countries. A total of 81 countries competed for the ten spots available in the 2012 World Twenty20 Qualifier. The sixteen teams which contested the final qualifying competition were:

Ireland defeated Afghanistan in the final to win the championship, and again both teams progressed to play in the 2012 ICC World Twenty20.

2013 Qualifiers[edit]

The 2013 ICC World Twenty20 Qualifier was played in November 2013. It continued to use a 16-team format, with ten qualifiers from regional Twenty20 tournaments plus the top six finishers of the previous competition. Ireland and Afghanistan (by finishing top of their groups), with Nepal and UAE (by winning first runners up knock out matches) and the Netherlands and Hong Kong (5th and 6th place) qualified for the 2014 ICC World Twenty20. The competing countries were:

The top six teams progressed to the 2014 ICC World Twenty20 tournament.

2015 Qualifiers[edit]

The 2015 ICC World Twenty20 Qualifier was played in July 2015 and co-hosted by two countries for the first time, Ireland and Scotland. Both the final and the third-place playoff were abandoned due to rain; Scotland and the Netherlands shared the title, while Ireland were ranked third over Hong Kong due to a superior performance in the group stage. The number of teams at the tournament was reduced to 14, with the ICC Africa and ICC Americas regional bodies each losing a spot and the ACC gaining one from ICC Europe:

The top six teams progressed to the 2016 ICC World Twenty20 tournament.

Winners[edit]

The two associate qualifiers for the inaugural 2007 ICC World Twenty20 were decided in the 2007 World Cricket League Division One tournament. Kenya and Scotland qualified.

Year Host(s) Final
venue
Final
Winner Result Runner-up
2008  Ireland Belfast  Ireland
 Netherlands
Abandoned – title shared
scorecard
2010  UAE Dubai  Afghanistan
147/2 (17.3 overs)
Afghanistan won by 8 wickets
scorecard
 Ireland
142/8 (20 overs)
2012  UAE Dubai  Ireland
156/5 (18.5 overs)
Ireland won by 5 wickets
scorecard
 Afghanistan
152/7 (20 overs)
2013  UAE Abu Dhabi  Ireland
225/7 (20 overs)
Ireland won by 68 runs
scorecard
 Afghanistan
157 (18.5 overs)
2015  Ireland
 Scotland
Dublin  Netherlands
 Scotland
Abandoned – title shared
scorecard

Performance by team[edit]

Legend
  • 1st – Champions
  • 2nd – Runners-up
  • 3rd – Third place
  •     — Hosts
  • Teams that qualified for the World Twenty20 are underlined.
Team Northern Ireland
2008
United Arab Emirates
2010
United Arab Emirates
2012
United Arab Emirates
2013
Republic of Ireland
Scotland
2015
Total
 Afghanistan 1st 2nd 2nd 5th 4
 Bermuda 6th 13th 14th 3
 Canada 5th 8th 6th 12th 14th 5
 Denmark 16th 16th 2
 Hong Kong 11th 6th 4th 3
 Ireland 1st 2nd 1st 1st 3rd 5
 Italy 10th 9th 2
 Jersey 11th 1
 Kenya 4th 5th 9th 11th 9th 5
 Namibia 3rd 10th 7th 3
   Nepal 7th 3rd 12th 3
 Netherlands 1st 4th 4th 5th 1st 5
 Oman 15th 6th 2
 Papua New Guinea 8th 8th 8th 3
 Scotland 3rd 7th 5th 7th 1st 5
 United Arab Emirates 3rd 4th 13th 3
 Uganda 14th 13th 2
 United States 6th 12th 15th 10th 4

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://icc-cricket.yahoo.com/media-release/2008/July/media-release20080717-39.html ICC-Cricket, retrieved 17 July 2008
  2. ^ "Important dates for Associate cricket". Cricinfo.com. Retrieved August 11, 2009. 
  3. ^ "UAE to host expanded World Twenty20 Qualifiers". Cricinfo.com. Retrieved June 27, 2009. 

External links[edit]