iD (software)

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iD
OpenStreetMap-Editor iD Logo.svg
Osm-id.png
Original author(s)Richard Fairhurst, Tom MacWright, John Firebaugh, Saman Bemel-Benrud, Ansis Brammanis[1]
Developer(s)Multiple contributors
Initial releaseMay 7, 2013; 6 years ago (2013-05-07)[2]
Stable release
2.9.0 / June 14, 2018; 11 months ago (2018-06-14)[3]
Repositoryhttps://github.com/openstreetmap/iD
Written inJavaScript
PlatformWeb browser
Available in78[4] languages
TypeGIS software
LicenseISC
Websiteideditor.com

iD is a free software online editor for OpenStreetMap (OSM) geodata created in JavaScript and released in 2013. It is designed to be simple and user friendly[5] and is used as a default editor on main OSM page.

Usage[edit]

It's the most popular OSM editor by number of users.[6]

iD's features include choosing custom aerial imagery and native support for Mapillary photos.[7]

Some specialized forks of iD:

  • Strava Slide, which allows easy optimizing the ways to match GPS tracks collected by Strava users[8]
  • iD-indoor, which is intended for indoor mapping[9]
  • Mapeo, experimental editor for offline mapping in remote environments[10][11][12]

History[edit]

Prior to iD, the primary web editor for OpenStreetMap data was the Flash-based Potlatch 2 editor.[13][14]. The iD editor project was founded by the author of Potlatch 1 and 2, Richard Fairhurst, online on July 13, 2012[15] and at the State of the Map conference on October 14, 2012.[16]

In September 2012, the Knight Foundation announced the winners of the Knight News Challenge: Data competition. The team from Development Seed/Mapbox was selected as a winner for their proposal to develop new contribution tools for OpenStreetMap, and awarded a grant of $575,000.[17][18] With this investment in hand, Mapbox collaborated with Richard Fairhurst to work on iD.[19] The initial release of iD, labeled "Alpha0", came out shortly thereafter on December 22, 2012.[20]

Name[edit]

The choice of iD as a name is related to popularity of getElementById in JavaScript, combination of iPad with Système D, and a tribute to the Citroen iD car model. It was also meant to be easier to spell than Potlatch.[16]

Technical background[edit]

This editor was meant to be a Potlatch 2 architecture reimplementation in JavaScript with redesigned user interface. The (only) big internal change was departure from XML tagging preset architecture to a JSON-based one.[16]

While the initial versions were based on Dojo framework,[21] iD now uses D3.js library for rendering and its primary mode of rendering is via SVG. Its core architecture is modular and designed to be easily used in other JavaScript-based tools for OpenStreetMap.[22]

Versions[edit]

Branch Original
release date
Version Version
release date
Support Model
Alpha December 21, 2012 Alpha 3 February 23, 2013
Beta April 2, 2013 Beta 1 April 2, 2013
1.0 May 9, 2013 1.0.1 May 10, 2013 EOL (End-of-life)
1.1 August 9, 2013 1.1.6 August 23, 2013 EOL
1.2 September 26, 2013 1.2.1 September 30, 2013 EOL
1.3 24 de outubro de 2013 1.3.10 May 21, 2014 EOL
1.4 May 29, 2014 1.4.0 May 29, 2014 EOL
1.5 July 8, 2014 1.5.4 July 29, 2014 EOL
1.6 October 6, 2014 1.6.3 10 de fevereiro de 2015 EOL
1.7 11 de fevereiro de 2015 1.7.4 September 16, 2015 EOL
1.8 November 8, 2015 1.8.3 December 11, 2015 EOL
1.9 March 1, 2016 1.9.4 May 4, 2016 Active
2.0 November 15, 2016 2.0.2 December 22, 2016 Active
2.1 February 4, 2017 2.1.3 February 24, 2017 Active
2.2 May 9, 2017 2.2.2 June 12, 2017 Active

References[edit]

  1. ^ iD: The easy-to-use OpenStreetMap editor in JavaScript, OpenStreetMap on GitHub, 2017-10-21, retrieved 2017-10-22
  2. ^ Firebaugh, John (7 May 2013). "New Map Editor Launches on OpenStreetMap.org". Mapbox. Retrieved 6 November 2016.
  3. ^ https://github.com/openstreetmap/iD/releases
  4. ^ https://github.com/openstreetmap/iD/tree/master/dist/locales
  5. ^ "OpenStreetMap launches all-new easy map editor and announces funding appeal". OpenStreetMap blog. 7 May 2013. Retrieved 6 November 2016.
  6. ^ https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Editor_usage_stats#by_number_of_users_.28distinct_uids.29
  7. ^ https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Comparison_of_editors#iD
  8. ^ http://labs.strava.com/slide/
  9. ^ https://git.framasoft.org/PanierAvide/iD-indoor
  10. ^ Halliday James (9 June 2016). "OpenStreetMap Without Servers [Part 2] A peer-to-peer OSM database". Retrieved 18 July 2016.
  11. ^ https://github.com/digidem/mapeo-desktop
  12. ^ MacLennan, Gregor (22 July 2016). "Technology Preview: Participatory mapping in the Amazon with Mapeo". Retrieved 11 August 2016.
  13. ^ https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Comparison_of_editors
  14. ^ https://blog.openstreetmap.org/2009/11/30/introducing-a-new-osm-editor-potlatch-2/
  15. ^ https://blog.openstreetmap.org/2012/07/13/building-a-friendly-editor-for-openstreetmap/
  16. ^ a b c https://web.archive.org/web/20121023145335/http://www.systemed.net/blog/index.php?post=24
  17. ^ https://www.knightfoundation.org/press/releases/six-ventures-bring-data-public-winners-knight-news
  18. ^ https://blog.mapbox.com/large-investment-in-openstreetmap-from-knight-foundation-cf7aa00534db
  19. ^ https://www.mapbox.com/osmdev/2012/10/25/diving-into-id/
  20. ^ https://www.mapbox.com/osmdev/2012/12/22/alpha0/
  21. ^ https://www.mapbox.com/osmdev/2012/10/25/diving-into-id/
  22. ^ https://github.com/openstreetmap/iD/blob/master/ARCHITECTURE.md

External links[edit]