IP3 International

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IP3 International is a nuclear technology company formed in June 2016. One project involved a plan to transfer nuclear technology from the United States to Saudi Arabia.

Personnel[edit]

Notable personnel include:

Michael Flynn has described himself as an advisor to IP3, which the company denies.[5][6] The company does acknowledge that it has a relationship with Flynn and some officials of the company were part of ACU Strategic Partners, but had differences with Russian partnership which was advocated by its managing partner, Alex Copson.[7][8]

Trump administration controversy[edit]

During the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign of Donald Trump, and subsequently, Trump aides Michael Flynn and Jared Kushner were engaged in promoting IP3 International's plan to transfer nuclear technology from the US to Saudi Arabia, for use in a proposed joint US-Russian project, in possible violation of the Atomic Energy Act.[9][10][11][12][13] In January 2017, Derek Harvey, a retired Army intelligence officer, former staffer for David Petraeus, and then-staffer of the National Security Council under Michael Flynn, advocated for the IP3 nuclear sales plan. Harvey continued to speak with Michael Flynn "every night" even after Flynn resigned.[5]

In February 2019, United States House Committee on Oversight and Reform chairman Elijah E. Cummings released a report on the matter, based in part upon testimony from whistleblowers within White House.[13][14][15][16][17][5][18][19] The House Oversight Committee released a second interim staff report and supporting documents in July 2019, highlighting the "gold standard" of nuclear proliferation. It also reported lobbying by Flynn and Barrack and briefings to White House members including President Trump, Jared Kushner, Gary Cohn, Mike Pompeo, and Rick Perry.[20] [21] [22][23]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "OUR TEAM - IP3 Int'l". IP3 Int'l. Archived from the original on 2019-02-19. Retrieved 22 February 2019.
  2. ^ Walker, Joseph (14 December 2011). "Gaming's New Frontier After Zynga". WSJ. Archived from the original on 2015-01-31. Retrieved 22 February 2019. a little-known start-up called Trion Worlds Inc. A gaming company founded a couple of years earlier by Lars Buttler, a former Electronic Arts executive, Trion had yet to release a product.
  3. ^ "Personnel Files: Nuclear expert Michael Wallace joins CSIS". Washington Post. 2011-07-20. Archived from the original on 2018-07-04. Retrieved 22 February 2019. The Center for Strategic and International Studies has announced that Michael Wallace, former Vice Chairman and COO of Constellation Energy, has joined CSIS as a Senior Advisor. ... Wallace is also a member of the National Infrastructure Advisory Council (NIAC)
  4. ^ "Time's Running Out to Prevent a Massive Cyberattack on Critical Infrastructure, Advisory Group Says". Nextgov.com. Archived from the original on 2018-03-12. Retrieved 22 February 2019. “We all know how accountability works,” said former Constellation Energy Vice Chairman Michael Wallace, who co-chaired the report with Carr.
  5. ^ a b c "Trump appointees promoted nuclear sales to Saudi Arabia despite warnings, report says". Washington Post. 19 February 2019. Archived from the original on 2019-02-19.
  6. ^ "Statement on Nuclear Energy from IP3 International". businesswire.com. 2019-02-19. Archived from the original on 2019-02-20. Retrieved 2019-02-20.
  7. ^ Colman, Zack. (19 February 2019). "House report lays bare White House feud over Saudi nuclear push." Politico website Retrieved 11 November 2019.
  8. ^ Prokop, Andrew. (17 December 2017). "Michael Flynn’s involvement in a plan to build nuclear reactors in the Middle East is looking even shadier." Vox website Retrieved 11 November 2019.
  9. ^ Jeff Stein (2017-06-09). "Michael Flynn, Russia and a grand scheme to build nuclear power plants in the Middle East". Newsweek. Archived from the original on 2019-02-20.
  10. ^ "Michael Flynn's role in Middle Eastern nuclear project could compound legal issues". Washington Post. 27 November 2017. Archived from the original on 2017-11-27.
  11. ^ "Inside the White House, Michael Flynn pushed proposal from company he said he had advised". Washington Post. 29 November 2017. Archived from the original on 2017-11-29.
  12. ^ "Why Trump might bend nuclear security rules to help Saudi Arabia build reactors in the desert". Washington Post. 20 February 2018. Archived from the original on 2018-02-20.
  13. ^ a b "Whistleblowers: Flynn backed plan to transfer nuclear tech to Saudis". NBC News. Archived from the original on 2019-02-20.
  14. ^ Fandos, Nicholas; Mazzetti, Mark (19 February 2019). "House Opens Inquiry Into Proposed U.S. Nuclear Venture in Saudi Arabia". Archived from the original on 2019-02-20 – via NYTimes.com.
  15. ^ Durkin, Erin (19 February 2019). "House investigates 'White House plan' to share nuclear technology with Saudis". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 2019-02-20.
  16. ^ "CEOs Ask Trump to Help Them Sell Nuclear Power Plants Abroad". Bloomberg. Archived from the original on 2019-02-20.
  17. ^ "Trump officials accused of promoting nuclear power sales to Saudis". Financial Times.
  18. ^ Kara Scannell; Marshall Cohen. "Dems to investigate Flynn-backed efforts to bring nuclear power to Saudis". CNN. Archived from the original on 2019-02-20.
  19. ^ Breuninger, Kevin (19 February 2019). "House Democrats investigate White House plan to transfer nuclear tech to Saudis". CNBC. Archived from the original on 2019-02-20.
  20. ^ "Trump ally Tom Barrack backed Saudis' nuclear goals, House panel finds". The Middletown Press. 30 July 2019. Retrieved 30 July 2019.
  21. ^ "Oversight: Trump confidant Tom Barrack pushed for Saudi nuclear plant construction". TheHill. Retrieved 30 July 2019.
  22. ^ "Corporate and Foreign Interests Behind White House Push to Transfer U.S. Nuclear Technology to Saudi Arabia Prepared for Chairman Elijah E. Cummings Second Interim Staff Report Committee on Oversight and Reform U.S. House of Representatives July 2019" (PDF). oversight.house.gov. Retrieved 29 July 2019.
  23. ^ "Appendix A – Documents" (PDF). oversight.house.gov. Retrieved 29 July 2019.

External links[edit]

Official website