Saeed Jarabh

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Saeed Ahmed Mohammed Abdullab Sarem Jarabh
Born1976 (age 42–43)
Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
Detained atGuantanamo
ISN235
StatusTransferred to the United Arab Emirates

Saeed Ahmed Mohammed Abdullab Sarem Jarabh is a citizen of Yemen who was held in extrajudicial detention for over fourteen years in the United States Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, in Cuba.[1] Joint Task Force Guantanamo analysts estimate he was born in 1976 in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

He was transferred to United Arab Emirates, with fourteen other men, on August 15, 2016.[2][3][4]

During the Bush presidency, OARDEC review boards classed him as an "enemy combatant". The Obama presidency replace OARDEC with the Guantanamo Joint Review Task Force, which recommended continued indefinite detention, a status commentators characterized as a "forever prisoner".[5][6][7] A Periodic Review Board finally cleared him for release on March 18, 2015.

Scholars at the Brookings Institution, led by Benjamin Wittes, listed the captives still held in Guantanamo in December 2008, according to whether their detention was justified by certain common allegations.:[8]

  • Saeed Ahmed Mohammed Abdullah Sarem Jarabh was listed as one of the captives who "The military alleges ... are members of Al Qaeda."[8]
  • Saeed Ahmed Mohammed Abdullah Sarem Jarabh was listed as one of the captives who "The military alleges ... took military or terrorist training in Afghanistan."[8]
  • Saeed Ahmed Mohammed Abdullah Sarem Jarabh was listed as one of the captives who "The military alleges ... were at Tora Bora."[8]
  • Saeed Ahmed Mohammed Abdullah Sarem Jarabh was listed as one of the captives who was a foreign fighter.[8]
  • Saeed Ahmed Mohammed Abdullah Sarem Jarabh was listed as one of the captives who had "denied all the government allegations."[8]

Habeas corpus[edit]

A habeas corpus petition was submitted on his behalf. In 2005, following a Freedom of Information Act request, the Associated Press placed a dossier of documents from his Combatant Status Review Tribunal, for his lawyers.[9]

Periodic Review Board[edit]

A Periodic Review Board met to consider his status, on January 27, 2015.[10] The PRB recommended he be transferred from Guantanamo on March 18, 2015.[7] Carol Rosenberg, reporting in the Miami Herald, noted that by the time the PRB considered his status, analysts had quietly dropped the allegation that he had been one of Osama bin Laden's bodyguards, instead calling him a "low level fighter", who "lacked a leadership position in al-Qaida or the Taliban.""" His PRB explained their decision, in part, due to a "lack of indications that the detainee harbors anti-American sentiments, extremist beliefs or intention to reengage"

References[edit]

  1. ^ OARDEC. "List of Individuals Detained by the Department of Defense at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba from January 2002 through May 15, 2006" (PDF). United States Department of Defense. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2007-09-30. Retrieved 2006-05-15. Works related to List of Individuals Detained by the Department of Defense at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba from January 2002 through May 15, 2006 at Wikisource
  2. ^ Margot Williams (2008-11-03). "Guantanamo Docket: Saeed Ahmed Mohammed Abdullah Sarem Jarabh". New York Times. Retrieved 2016-08-17.
  3. ^ Benjamin Wittes (2016-08-16). "A Big Guantanamo Transfer: Progress Towards the Site's Obsolescence". Lawfare.
  4. ^ Camila Domonoske (2016-08-16). "15 Guantanamo Bay Detainees Transferred To United Arab Emirates". National Public Radio. Two of the Afghan prisoners — Mohammed Kamin and Obaidallah, who only has one name — had been briefly charged in a military commission, The Miami Herald reports. The war crimes prosecutor dropped those charges.
  5. ^ Carol Rosenberg (2013-06-17). "FOAI suit reveals Guantanamo's 'indefinite detainees'". Miami Herald. Archived from the original on 2014-11-21. Retrieved 2016-08-18. The Miami Herald's Carol Rosenberg, with the assistance of the Media Freedom and Information Access Clinic at the Yale Law School, filed suit in federal court in Washington D.C., in March for the list under the Freedom of Information Act. The students, in collaboration with Washington attorney Jay Brown, represented Rosenberg in a lawsuit that specifically sought the names of the 46 surviving prisoners.
  6. ^ Carol Rosenberg (2013-06-17). "List of 'indefinite detainees'". Miami Herald. Archived from the original on 2016-04-11. Retrieved 2016-08-18.
  7. ^ a b Carol Rosenberg (2015-03-18). "Guantánamo parole board clears another 'forever prisoner'". Miami Herald. Archived from the original on 2016-06-03.
  8. ^ a b c d e f Benjamin Wittes, Zaathira Wyne (2008-12-16). "The Current Detainee Population of Guantánamo: An Empirical Study" (PDF). The Brookings Institution. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2013-06-01. Retrieved 2010-02-16.
  9. ^ "Saeed Ahmed Mohammed Abdullah Sarem Jarabh v. Bush" (PDF). US Department of Defense.
  10. ^ Ian Simpson (2015-01-27). "U.S. panel weighs case of alleged al Qaeda fighter at Guantanamo". Arlington, Virginia: Reuters. A statement read by Jarabh's military representatives said he had studied Spanish and English at Guantanamo, had headed a prison farm planning project and had taken up painting.

External links[edit]