ITHF table hockey

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Table hockey being played
Countries where table hockey is played (at least one ranked player)[1]

Table hockey is a sport played on table hockey games. The International Table Hockey Federation (ITHF) uses only table hockeys made by Stiga.[2] The origin of the sport was the Swedish Championship 1982 in Upplands Väsby. Organized table hockey is played in Northern, Central and Eastern Europe, in North America, but table hockey also play some players from South America, Africa, Australia, or Asia.

The World Championship is organized by the ITHF every two years. The Stiga Play Off game is the official game of the Table Hockey World Championship.

Sweden has dominated the table hockey scene from the beginning and a couple of years into the new millennium. Until the Finnish gold in Riga 2005, Sweden had won all Team World Championships, until 2006 only Swedes had won the Open Swedish Masters, and until 2007 all individual world champions were Swedes. But the new generation comes from Finland, Russia, Ukraine, the Czech Republic and Latvia, and its current big star is Maxim Borisov from Russia who is the reigning World and European champion. Borisov has been ranked #1 in the world since December 2013.

Since the sport expands quickly in many countries, the table hockey map may have to be redrawn within a couple of years when nations other than the big seven (Sweden, Finland, Russia, Czech Republic, Norway, Latvia and Ukraine) produce new talents.

History[edit]

First table hockeys were made in the 1930s in Sweden and Finland. Naturally there was no plastic, so they were made from sheet metal.

The use of plastic brought an expansion of table hockey. The Swedish company Stiga started to make hockey tables in the late 1950s. Thanks to the enthusiasm of Swedish players, table hockey expanded to the rest of the world.

Big worldwide development arrived in the late 1990s. That led to an idea founding an international federation. ITHF was established during the World Championship 2005 in Riga, Latvia. Now it associates sixteen national federations.

Especially in Sweden, Finland, Russia, Czech Republic, Norway and Latvia, table hockey is quite popular. But it is growing in lots of countries and there are many tournaments played every week.

Game rules[edit]

A player figure with puck.
A plastic glass, which helps to keep the puck in play. It is attached to the table behind the goal.
Table hockey face-off
Table hockey mechanics of player movement.

These are the most important rules. Whole rules.

Game model and preparation[edit]

  • Stiga games must be used.
  • Goal cups must be removed.
  • Games must be fastened to the table.
  • The speed of the game’s surface must be kept the same as the usual factory surface speed.

Playing figures[edit]

  • Figures from the Play-off version (all figures have the stick on the same side) of Stiga table hockey games must be used.

Matches[edit]

  • Matches last five minutes.
  • Time runs even if the puck is out of play.
  • An audio timer should be used for all matches.
  • If any player retires during a match when the opponent insists on continuing, he/she automatically loses all his/her goals scored during the game, while the opponent may add an extra five goals to his/her score.
  • During the play-off matches, in the event of a draw at the end of the five minutes, there is an overtime. The overtime starts with a new face-off. The winner is the one who scores the first goal (sudden death).

Face-offs[edit]

  • All matches begin with the puck placed at centre spot. Game starts with the opening signal. If any player plays the puck before the signal, face-off is made.
  • Face-offs are made by dropping the puck on the centre spot.

Centre forwards and left defenders must stay on their own side of the centre red line during a face-off.

  • Players must be sure that their opponent is ready before releasing the puck. If the face-off is made wrong the opponent is allowed to ask for a new one or he/she may make a new face-off by himself/herself. If a player makes a lot of bad drops in a play-off match, the opponent can ask for a neutral dropper.
  • Three seconds must elapse after each face-off before a valid goal can be scored. This rule is in effect even if a neutral person is making the face-off.
  • The puck must hit the sideboards, or a playing figure other than the center must gain control of the puck before a goal can be counted.

Scoring[edit]

  • The puck must stay in the goal cage for the goal to count. In and outs do not count. If the puck goes out from the goal cage, the match continues without interruption.
  • The puck must be removed from the puck catcher (if there is any) before the next face off.
  • A goal scored directly by pressing a motionless puck against the goal cage or against the goalie does not count. A goal scored in this way indirectly (off the bank or off another figure) counts.
  • If a goal is scored when the final buzzer is sounding, the goal is not valid.
  • If any figure or goalie breaks when a goal is scored, the goal is valid.
  • A goal scored by moving the whole game is not valid.

Goal crease rule[edit]

  • If the puck is in full rest in goal crease and is touching the goal line the defending player may call “block” and a new face-off is made.
  • If the puck is in full rest in goal crease and is not touching the goal line the defending player must play the puck.

Possession rule[edit]

  • It is not permitted to retain possession of the puck without making any recognizable attempt to score a goal. This is regarded as passive play.
  • If the puck is kept in possession by one figure without passing or shooting, a warning can be given by the opponent after five (5) seconds has elapsed since the figure gained puck control.

Interference[edit]

  • A player can tap down his/her figures only when he/she has complete possession of the puck.
  • If a player scores a goal while the opponent is tapping his/her figures, the goal counts.
  • Rough playing that results in shaking of the game and causing the puck to move is forbidden.
  • If any figure loses possession of the puck due to shaking of the game, then the puck must be returned to this figure.

Interruption[edit]

  • If any unusual situation happens (e.g. broken gear, rod or game, displaced goal cage, lights go out, several pucks appear on the game or somebody/something interrupts any of the opponents), the match must be immediately suspended. A player can interrupt the game by saying „stop” if the opponent is not aware of such situation. The match resumes when both players are ready again.
  • If a match is interrupted and significant time is lost then the lost time must be added to remaining time and the match continues.
  • If a player had indisputable control of the puck before the interruption, the match continues with the puck in the place where it was, otherwise a new face-off is made.

Tournaments[edit]

Tables prepared for a tournament

The ITHF divides individual tournaments to six levels.

Level 1 Tournaments history[edit]

World Championships, Continental Championships

World Championship history[edit]

Year Location Winner No. of Participants
1989 Sweden Stockholm, Sweden Sweden Mikael Kratz 42 (7 nationalities)
1992 Czechoslovakia Brno, Czechoslovakia Sweden Jacob Lindahl 32 (5 nationalities)
1993 France Paris, France Sweden Anders Ekestubbe 61 (9 nationalities)
1995 Sweden Stockholm, Sweden Sweden Jacob Lindahl 66 (8 nationalities)
1997 Finland Helsinki, Finland Sweden Hans Österman 61 (9 nationalities)
1999 Germany Wilhelmshaven, Germany Sweden Stefan Edwall 71 (15 nationalities)
2001 Czech Republic Plzeň, Czech Republic Sweden Hans Österman 100 (16 nationalities)
2003 Switzerland Zurich, Switzerland Sweden Daniel Wallén 102 (19 nationalities)
2005 Latvia Riga, Latvia Sweden Hans Österman 132 (22 nationalities)
2007 Russia Moscow, Russia Finland Roni Nuttunen 117 (19 nationalities)
2009 Hungary Budapest, Hungary Finland Roni Nuttunen 131 (16 nationalities)
2011 Finland Turku, Finland Russia Oleg Dmitrichenko 105 (17 nationalities)
2013 Norway Stavanger, Norway Latvia Atis Silis 121 (23 nationalities)
2015 Russia St. Petersburg, Russia Russia Maxim Borisov 108 (16 nationalities)

European Championship history[edit]

Year Location Winner No. of Participants
1990 Sweden Lund, Sweden Sweden Jörgen Sundqvist 63 (9 nationalities)
1992 Czechoslovakia Brno, Czechoslovakia Sweden Mikael Kratz 75 (5 nationalities)
2006 Slovakia Skalica, Slovakia Russia Alexey Zakharov 111 (17 nationalities)
2008 Latvia Riga, Latvia Finland Ahti Lampi 103 (10 nationalities)
2010 Sweden Överum, Sweden Finland Ahti Lampi 82 (9 nationalities)
2012 Latvia Riga, Latvia Russia Maxim Borisov 106 (13 nationalities)
2014 Latvia Riga, Latvia Russia Maxim Borisov 122 (14 nationalities)
2016 Estonia Tallinn, Estonia Latvia Edgars Caics 124 (15 nationalities)

North American Championships history[edit]

Year Location Winner No. of Participants
2008 United States Detroit, United States United States Kenny Dubois 38 (3 nationalities)
2009 United States Detroit, United States Canada Bernie Kunzler 36 (3 nationalities)
2010 United States Detroit, United States Denmark Bjarne Axelsen 34 (4 nationalities)
2011 United States Detroit, United States Denmark Bjarne Axelsen 25 (4 nationalities)
2012 United States Detroit, United States Denmark Bjarne Axelsen 48 (4 nationalities)
2013 United States Detroit, United States Denmark Bjarne Axelsen 42 (3 nationalities)
2014 United States Livonia, United States Canada Bruce Turner 40 (2 nationalities)
2015 United States Livonia, United States Sweden Karl Jönsson 40 (4 nationalities)
2016 United States Livonia, United States Czech Republic Roman Nezhyba 35 (3 nationalities)

Level 2 Tournaments[edit]

World Tour Big 6 (now World Tour Majors and World Tour Super Series)

Big Six Tournament[edit]

Name Location State season
Norway Open Oslo, Bergen NorwayNorway 1996/1997, 1999/2000 - 2013/2014
Helsinki Open Helsinki Finland Finland 2003/2004 - 2013/2014
Riga Open Riga Latvia Latvia 1999/2000, 2003/2003 - 2013/2014
Swedish Masters Upplands Väsby, Stockholm, Enköping, Gothenburg, Jönköping, Eskilstuna, Överum, Solna, Malmö Sweden Sweden 1982/1983 - 1983/1984, 1985/1986 - 2013/2014
Moscow Cup Moscow, Mytishchi Russia Russia 2001/2002 - 2013/2014
Czech Open Prague, Plzeň, Příbram, Liberec, Letovice Czech RepublicCzech Republic 2002/2003 - 2013/2014

Level 3 Tournaments[edit]

World Tour, Regional Championships (f.i. Baltic Championships), World Championships Special Classes (Junior, Women, Veteran), Continental Championships Special Classes (Junior, Women, Veteran), Continental Tours (North American Tour), National Championships (only if 1 tournament per season)

World Women Championship history[edit]

Year Location Winner No. of Participants
1992 Czechoslovakia Brno, Czechoslovakia France Nathalie Biais 6 (3 nationalities)
1993 France Paris, France Sweden Sissie Wikström 9 (5 nationalities)
1995 Sweden Stockholm, Sweden Sweden Chatrin Johansson 12 (6 nationalities)
1997 Finland Helsinki, Finland Sweden Sissie Wikström 8 (5 nationalities)
1999 Germany Wilhelmshaven, Germany Finland Tarja Lindberg 8 (3 nationalities)
2001 Czech Republic Plzeň, Czech Republic Finland Piia Pulliainen 12 (6 nationalities)
2003 Switzerland Zurich, Switzerland Finland Piia Pulliainen 22 (8 nationalities)
2005 Latvia Riga, Latvia Finland Piia Pulliainen 21 (8 nationalities)
2007 Russia Moscow, Russia Russia Alexandra Belavina 15 (6 nationalities)
2009 Hungary Budapest, Hungary Russia Maria Yalbacheva 23 (9 nationalities)
2011 Finland Turku, Finland Russia Maria Yalbacheva 16 (7 nationalities)
2013 Norway Stavanger, Norway Russia Maria Miloradova 18 (9 nationalities)
2015 Russia St. Petersburg, Russia Russia Viktoria Laricheva 18 (8 nationalities)

World Junior Championship history[edit]

Year Location Winner No. of Participants
1997 Finland Helsinki, Finland Finland Mikael Lindberg 9 (5 nationalities)
1999 Germany Wilhelmshaven, Germany Finland Erno Lantiainen 8 (4 nationalities)
2001 Czech Republic Plzeň, Czech Republic Finland Miikka Pulliainen 14 (7 nationalities)
2003 Switzerland Zurich, Switzerland Russia Alexey Zaharov 24 (10 nationalities)
2005 Latvia Riga, Latvia Finland Roni Nuttunen 26 (11 nationalities)
2007 Russia Moscow, Russia Finland Roni Nuttunen 22 (8 nationalities)
2009 Hungary Budapest, Hungary Finland Ahti Lampi 29 (10 nationalities)
2011 Finland Turku, Finland Russia Maxim Borisov 20 (8 nationalities)
2013 Norway Stavanger, Norway Russia Maxim Borisov 25 (10 nationalities)
2015 Russia St. Petersburg, Russia Russia Mikhail Shashkov 20 (9 nationalities)

World Veteran Championship history[edit]

Year Location Winner No. of Participants
2005 Latvia Riga, Latvia Sweden Thomas Petersson 24 (11 nationalities)
2007 Russia Moscow, Russia Czech Republic Pavel Plešák 25 (13 nationalities)
2009 Hungary Budapest, Hungary Sweden Pontus Eriksson 35 (12 nationalities)
2011 Finland Turku, Finland Russia Dmitriy Petrov 24 (11 nationalities)
2013 Norway Stavanger, Norway Russia Alexey Titov 36 (16 nationalities)
2015 Russia St. Petersburg, Russia Russia Stanislav Lutay 39 (14 nationalities)

European Women Championship history[edit]

Year Location Winner No. of Participants
1992 Czechoslovakia Brno, Czechoslovakia France Nathalie Biais 7 (4 nationalities)
2006 Slovakia Skalica, Slovakia Russia Alexandra Belavina 17 (7 nationalities)
2008 Latvia Riga, Latvia Russia Maria Yalbacheva 14 (7 nationalities)
2010 Sweden Överum, Sweden Russia Maria Yalbacheva 15 (6 nationalities)
2012 Latvia Riga, Latvia Russia Viktoria Laricheva 20 (8 nationalities)
2014 Latvia Riga, Latvia Russia Viktoria Laricheva 18 (8 nationalities)
2016 Estonia Tallinn, Estonia Ukraine Viktoriya Noselivska 22 (7 nationalities)

European Junior Championship history[edit]

Year Location Winner No. of Participants
2006 Slovakia Skalica, Slovakia Latvia Edgars Caics 24 (6 nationalities)
2008 Latvia Riga, Latvia Finland Ahti Lampi 22 (8 nationalities)
2010 Sweden Överum, Sweden Latvia Matiss Saulitis 25 (7 nationalities)
2012 Latvia Riga, Latvia Russia Maxim Borisov 25 (7 nationalities)
2014 Latvia Riga, Latvia Finland Jan Pelkonen 35 (11 nationalities)
2016 Estonia Tallinn, Estonia Russia Veniamin Gerasimov 37 (10 nationalities)

European Veteran Championship history[edit]

Year Location Winner No. of Participants
2006 Slovakia Skalica, Slovakia Czech Republic Pavel Plešák 28 (9 nationalities)
2008 Latvia Riga, Latvia Czech Republic Pavel Plešák 26 (10 nationalities)
2010 Sweden Överum, Sweden Finland Janne Kokko 20 (6 nationalities)
2012 Latvia Riga, Latvia Czech Republic Jan Dryák 39 (12 nationalities)
2014 Latvia Riga, Latvia Sweden Lars Henriksson 41 (13 nationalities)
2016 Estonia Tallinn, Estonia Russia Alexey Titov 48 (13 nationalities)

Level 4 Tournaments[edit]

National Tours (*maximum 13 per season per nation), Regional Tours (f.i. SLO-CRO Interliga), National Championships Special Classes (Junior, Women, Veteran), Regional Championships Special Classes (Junior, Women, Veteran), North American Local League Playoffs (f.i. Lemont THL Playoff)

  • If the number of these tournaments is higher than 13 during a season the WR Administrator will change the leveling of tournament number 14, 15 etc. which means that only the first 13 tournaments in the particular season will be level 4.

Level 5 Tournaments[edit]

Sanctioned Local Leagues, National Championships Special Classes (Kids, SuperVeterans, Rookies)

Level 6 Tournaments[edit]

National Tour Special Classes (Junior, Women, Veteran), Local Leagues for Special Classes (Junior, Women, Veteran), Local Junior Tournaments, All Other Tournaments

Level 10 (Team) Tournaments[edit]

World Men's Team Championship history[edit]

Year Location Winning team No. of Teams
1992 Czechoslovakia Brno, Czechoslovakia Sweden Sweden 4
1993 France Paris, France Sweden Sweden 15
1995 Sweden Stockholm, Sweden Sweden Sweden 15
1997 Finland Helsinki, Finland Sweden Sweden II 14
1999 Germany Wilhelmshaven, Germany Sweden Sweden 8
2001 Czech Republic Plzeň, Czech Republic Sweden Sweden 13
2003 Switzerland Zurich, Switzerland Sweden Sweden 14
2005 Latvia Riga, Latvia Finland Finland 16
2007 Russia Moscow, Russia Sweden Sweden 15
2009 Hungary Budapest, Hungary Russia Russia 15
2011 Finland Turku, Finland Russia Russia 12
2013 Norway Stavanger, Norway Russia Russia 15
2015 Russia St. Petersburg, Russia Russia Russia 13

World Women's Team Championship history[edit]

Year Location Winning team No. of Teams
2005 Latvia Riga, Latvia Russia Russia 6
2007 Russia Moscow, Russia Russia Russia 4
2009 Hungary Budapest, Hungary Russia Russia 6
2011 Finland Turku, Finland Finland Finland 3
2013 Norway Stavanger, Norway Russia Russia 4
2015 Russia St. Petersburg, Russia Russia Russia 4

World Junior's Team Championship history[edit]

Year Location Winning team No. of Teams
2011 Finland Turku, Finland Russia Russia 7
2013 Norway Stavanger, Norway Russia Russia 7
2015 Russia St. Petersburg, Russia Russia Russia 6

World Veteran's Team Championship history[edit]

Year Location Winning team No. of Teams
2009 Hungary Budapest, Hungary Sweden Sweden 10
2011 Finland Turku, Finland Russia Russia 7
2013 Norway Stavanger, Norway Sweden Sweden 9
2015 Russia St. Petersburg, Russia Czech Republic Czech Republic 11

European Men's Team Championship history[edit]

Year Location Winning team No. of Teams
1990 Sweden Lund, Sweden Sweden Sweden III 15
1992 Czechoslovakia Brno, Czechoslovakia Sweden Sweden 8
2006 Slovakia Skalica, Slovakia Czech Republic Czech Republic 12
2008 Latvia Riga, Latvia Finland Finland 10
2010 Sweden Överum, Sweden Sweden Sweden 8
2012 Latvia Riga, Latvia Russia Russia 10
2014 Latvia Riga, Latvia Latvia Latvia 11
2016 Estonia Tallinn, Estonia Russia Russia 11

European Woman's Team Championship history[edit]

Year Location Winning team No. of Teams
2006 Slovakia Skalica, Slovakia Czech Republic Czech Republic 4
2008 Latvia Riga, Latvia Russia Russia 4
2010 Sweden Överum, Sweden Russia Russia 4
2012 Latvia Riga, Latvia Russia Russia 4
2014 Latvia Riga, Latvia Russia Russia 4
2016 Estonia Tallinn, Estonia Russia Russia 5

European Junior's Team Championship history[edit]

Year Location Winning team No. of Teams
2010 Sweden Överum, Sweden Russia Russia 6
2012 Latvia Riga, Latvia Russia Russia 6
2014 Latvia Riga, Latvia Ukraine Ukraine 9
2016 Estonia Tallinn, Estonia Russia Russia 9

European Veteran's Team Championship history[edit]

Year Location Winning team No. of Teams
2008 Latvia Riga, Latvia Sweden Sweden 8
2010 Sweden Överum, Sweden Russia Russia 5
2012 Latvia Riga, Latvia Czech Republic Czech Republic 6
2014 Latvia Riga, Latvia Russia Russia 11
2016 Estonia Tallinn, Estonia Russia Russia 11

World Club Championship history[edit]

Year Location Winning team No. of Teams
2007 Norway Oslo, Norway Sweden Enköping HSC 20 (7 nationalities)
2010 Czech Republic Liberec, Czech Republic Russia RTHF United Team 26 (8 nationalities)
2012 Russia St. Petersburg, Russia Latvia BJC Laimite 17 (5 nationalities)
2014 Czech Republic Letovice, Czech Republic Latvia BJC Laimite 31 (10 nationalities)
2016 Russia Kursk, Russia Latvia BJC Laimite 23 (3 nationalities)

World Table Hockey Tour[edit]

In 2003/04, the first worldwide league, EuroLeague, was created. 6 tournaments formed the league, The tournaments were Helsinki Open, Oslo Open, Riga Cup, Swedish Masters, Moscow Open and Czech Open.

The league has changed name to World Table Hockey Tour, and consists every year of around 15 tournaments. The original 6 tournaments are still regarded as the most important tournaments, and are called the Big Six tournaments.

List of all ITHF tournaments played. Click on the links to see playoff results:

Nation Tournament Name 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 City
World Championships x x x x x x Various
European Championships x x x x x Various
Canada Canada Challenge x x x Gatineau
Canada Canada Cup x x x Toronto
Canada Edmonton Centennial Challenge x x x x x x Edmonton
Canada Rose Bowl Classic x x x x x x x Montreal
Czech Republic Czech Open x x x x x x x x x x x x Various
Denmark Oresund Cup x x x x Elsinore/Copenhagen
Denmark Trophy of Denmark x x x x Bronderslev
Estonia Tallinn Cup x x Tallinn
Finland Helsinki Open x x x x x x x x x x x x Helsinki
Germany Berlin Open x x x x x x x x x x Berlin
Hungary Hungarian Open x x x x x x x Budapest/Komarom
Russia Kursk Cup x Kursk
Russia Moscow Cup x x x x x x x x x x x x Moscow
Russia Sankt-Petersburg Open x x x x x x St. Petersburg
Norway Oslo Open x x x x x x x x x x x x Oslo
Latvia Riga Open x x x x x x x x x x x x Riga
Latvia Ventspils Cup x x x Ventspils
Slovakia Bratislava Open x x x Bratislava
Slovakia Kosice Open x x Kosice
Slovenia Slovenia Open x x x x x x x Kranj
Sweden Swedish Masters x x x x x x x x x x x x Various
Switzerland Swiss Open x x x x x x x x Various
Ukraine Azov Masters x x Mariupol
Ukraine Ukraine Cup x x x x x x x x Kyiv
United States Boston Challenge x x x x Boston
United States Stiga Las Vegas x x x x x x x x x Las Vegas
United States Stiga North American Championships x x x x x x Detroit
United States Stiga U.S. Open x x x x x x x x x Chicago/Lemont

ITHF World ranking[edit]

Top nations by ITHF world ranking[3]
  15000+ points
  10000+ points
  5000+ points

up-to-date: 27 April 2009

The World ranking table sorts players by their actual rank points. The ranking is sum of player's best results in last two years. Points, which player gets for participating in any reported tournament are counted on the basis of: level of the tournament, number of players beaten and world ranking of players beaten. A winner of the World Championship gets always 1010 points and a winner of Europe Championship and North America Championship gets at least 510 points. World ranking with a reduced coefficient calculated points to six years. In the world ranking is more than 10 000 players from more than 50 countries and six continents.[4]

ITHF ranking - nations[edit]

Rank points of a country is sum of its five best players. The table below shows top ten nations as of June 22, 2016. Complete table

Rank Nation Top player (Rank) Rank points
1 Russia Russia Maxim Borisov (1) 22080
2 Latvia Latvia Edgars Caics (2) 20851
3 Finland Finland Ahti Lampi (7) 20115
4 Sweden Sweden Hans Österman (8) 20063
5 Czech Republic Czech Republic Patrik Petr (24) 18744
6 Ukraine Ukraine Dmytro Litvinyuk (17) 18262
7 Norway Norway Yngve Aasheim (43) 16040
8 Estonia Estonia Jevgeni Lvov (61) 15152
9 Slovakia Slovakia Imrich Blaško (110) 14047
10 Lithuania Lithuania Artem Valiev (82) 12441

ITHF ranking - open[edit]

Rank Nation Player Rank points
1 Russia Russia Maxim Borisov 4665
2 Latvia Latvia Edgars Caics 4588
3 Latvia Latvia Atis Silis 4530
4 Russia Russia Yanis Galuzo 4495
5 Russia Russia Alexey Zaharov 4357
6 Russia Russia Veniamin Gerasimov 4326
7 Finland Finland Ahti Lampi 4286
8 Sweden Sweden Hans Österman 4264
9 Russia Russia German Fokin 4237
10 Russia Russia Andrey Voskoboynikov 4181

ITHF ranking - ladies[edit]

Rank (Open rank) Nation Player Rank points
1 (50) Russia Russia Viktoria Laricheva 3648
2 (93) Estonia Estonia Maria Saveljeva 3265
3 (94) Ukraine Ukraine Viktoriya Noselivska 3263
4 (179) Sweden Sweden Caroline Eriksson 2811
5 (196) Russia Russia Irina Belavina 2755
6 (208) Russia Russia Maria Miloradova 2681
7 (239) Russia Russia Elena Nikitina 2547
8 (257) Latvia Latvia Laima Kamzola 2480
9 (269) Latvia Latvia Elena Racenaja 2435
10 (285) Russia Russia Eva Ozerova 2391

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

External links[edit]

Federations[edit]