IUP Crimson Hawks football

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IUP Crimson Hawks
IUPcrimson-hawk.png
Head coach Curt Cignetti
3rd year, 28–7–0 (.800)
Home stadium Miller Stadium
Stadium capacity 6,500
Stadium surface Artificial
Location Indiana, Pennsylvania
League NCAA Division II
Conference Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference
Division West
All-time record 496–248–23 (.662)
Postseason bowl record 18–18–0[a] (Expression error: Unrecognized word "sup".)
Conference titles 1934, 1940, 1986, 1987, 2012[b]
Division titles 1964, 1965, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1996, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2012
Consensus All-Americans 52[1]
Colors

Crimson and Gray

          
Rivals Clarion Golden Eagles
California Vulcans
Slippery Rock "The Rock"
Website IUP Football

The IUP Crimson Hawks football program represents Indiana University of Pennsylvania in college football at the NCAA Division II level. The Crimson Hawks play their home games at George P. Miller Stadium in Indiana, Pennsylvania.

The Crimson Hawks' current head coach is Curt Cignetti, who was introduced on January 21, 2011 to replace Lou Tepper. Before coming to IUP, Cignetti served as an assistant at the Division I level for 28 years.[2]

History[edit]

While little information is available, the Indiana Normal School played organized football games as early as 1890, when the school tied 6–6 with the Greensburg Athletic Association.[3] Early on the school played other institutions such as Washington & Jefferson, West Virginia University and Western University of Pennsylvania, club teams such as the Greensburg Athletic Association and the Latrobe Athletic Association, the first professional football team. From 1895 to 1903, the Normal School played Latrobe six times, being outscored a total of 201–0, but playing one 0–0 tie.[4] In 1892 they played against the Allegheny Athletic Association at Exposition Park in Pittsburgh, losing 20–6.[5]

John Brallier became the first professional football player in 1895 after playing at the Normal School for two years. Born in Cherry Tree, Pennsylvania, Brallier played on the West Indiana Public School team. He began attending the Normal School in 1893 at age 17 so that he could play on the team. That year, the team won three of their four games. The team included Alex Stewart, father of actor Jimmy Stewart. In 1894, the team played other colleges and teams with former college players, winning only two of five games. The Normal School played Washington & Jefferson, losing 28–0. In December, Washington & Jefferson coach E. Gard Edwards wrote to Brallier, impressed by his play, encouraging him to attend the university. Brallier agreed if all his expenses were paid, and left the Normal team after graduating from public school in the spring.[4]

University records begin with the tenure of George Miller in 1927. That first season, the Indiana State College team played other regional schools such as California State Normal School and Saint Vincent College, as well as further opponents such as Muskingum College and Kent State Normal College.[6] Miller served for 20 seasons. His teams were twice honored as the best of the Pennsylvania state normal schools by sportswriters, in 1934 and 1940.[7]

The Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference (PSAC) was formed by the members of the state system in 1951. Under future College Football Hall of Fame member Chuck Klausing, the team made their first appearances in the PSAC Championship game as the best team in the West Division. They lost both of their first two appearances, in 1964 and 1965.[7] In 1968, the team competed against Delaware in the Boardwalk Bowl, which served as the NCAA College Division's eastern championship.[8]

Frank Cignetti took over in 1986, and won the PSAC Championships that year, and again in 1987.[7] In 1987, IUP made their first NCAA playoff appearance. The same year, they were awarded their first of ten Lambert Cups as the best Division II team in the east, second only to Delaware's twelve wins.[9] Under Cignetti, IUP made two appearances in the NCAA Division II Championship in 1990 and 1993, losing both.[6] When Cignetti retired in 2005, his 15 postseason appearances were the most among Division II coaches, his 182 wins at IUP more than doubled the next closest coach (George Miller, 79), and his 199 wins total (including 17 at West Virginia) were second-best for active Division II coaches.[9]

Lou Tepper, who had previously coached at Illinois and Edinboro, took over in 2006. He became IUP's third coach, behind Bill Neal and Cignetti, that had served under Dave Hart at Pittsburgh.[10] In the first season under Tepper, the Crimson Hawks won the PSAC West. In his first three season, Tepper compiled a 25–7 record with the Crimson Hawks, but was 11–11 in his final two season and was dismissed as head coach following the 2010 season.[11]

On January 21, 2011, former Alabama wide receivers coach and recruiting coordinator and son of longtime IUP head coach Frank Cignetti, Curt Cignetti accepted the head coaching job to replace Tepper.[2]

Season records[edit]

Year Coach Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs Highest# Final°
1893 3–1
1894 2–3
George P. Miller (1927–1947)
1927 George Miller 4–4
1928 George Miller 3–4
1929 George Miller 4–3
1930 George Miller 3–3–1
1931 George Miller 4–2–2
1932 George Miller 5–3
1933 George Miller 4–2
1934 George Miller 6–0
1935 George Miller 5–3
1936 George Miller 4–2–1
1937 George Miller 6–1–1
1938 George Miller 3–4
1939 George Miller 4–2–2
1940 George Miller 7–0–1
1941 George Miller 4–2
1942 George Miller 5–3
1943 George Miller No games
1944 George Miller played
1945 George Miller 0–2
1946 George Miller 5–3
1947 George Miller 2–1–1
George P. Miller: 78–44–9
Regis "Peck" McKnight (1947–1948)
1947 Peck McKnight 1–1–1
1948 Peck McKnight 1–7
Peck McKnight: 2–8–1
Sam Smith (PSAC) (1949–1961)
1949 Sam Smith 4–4–1
1950 Sam Smith 4–4–1
1951 Sam Smith 5–3–1 5–3–1
1952 Sam Smith 4–4 1–4
1953 Sam Smith 4–4 3–2
1954 Sam Smith 5–3 3–2
1955 Sam Smith 3–5 3–2
1956 Sam Smith 5–4 4–1
1957 Sam Smith 3–6 2–2
1958 Sam Smith 5–3 4–1
1959 Sam Smith 3–4–1 1–3–1
1960 Sam Smith 2–4–2 1–3–2
1961 Sam Smith 2–7 1–4
Sam Smith: 49–55–6 28–27–4
Chuck Mills (PSAC) (1962–1963)
1962 Chuck Mills 5–2–1 4–1–1
1963 Chuck Mills 7–1–1 5–1
Chuck Mills: 12–3–2 9–2–1
Chuck Klausing (PSAC) (1964–1969)
1964 Chuck Klausing 8–2 6–0 L PSAC Championship
1965 Chuck Klausing 7–3 5–1 L PSAC Championship
Chuck Klausing (Independent) (1966–1969)
1966 Chuck Klausing 7–2
1967 Chuck Klausing 8–1
1968 Chuck Klausing 9–1 L Boardwalk Bowl
1969 Chuck Klausing 8–1
Chuck Klausing: 47–10 11–1
Bill Neal (Independent) (1970–1973)
1970 Bill Neal 5–4
1971 Bill Neal 7–2
1972 Bill Neal 8–1
1973 Bill Neal 4–5
Bill Neal (PSAC) (1974–1978)
1974 Bill Neal 6–4 4–2
1975 Bill Neal 8–1–1 4–1–1
1976 Bill Neal 4–5 3–3
1977 Bill Neal 4–4–1 2–3–1
1978 Bill Neal 4–5–1 2–4
Bill Neal: 50–31–3 15–13–2
Owen Dougherty (PSAC) (1979–1981)
1979 Owen Dougherty 7–3 3–3
1980 Owen Dougherty 6–3 3–3
1981 Owen Dougherty 4–6 2–4
Owen Dougherty: 17–13–0 8–10–0
George Chaump (PSAC) (1982–1985)
1982 George Chaump 4–6 3–3
1983 George Chaump 5–5 4–2
1984 George Chaump 7–3 4–2 6 14
1985 George Chaump 8–2–1 6–0 L PSAC Championship 3 9
George Chaump: 24–16–1 17–7
Frank Cignetti (PSAC) (1986–2005)
1986 Frank Cignetti 9–2 6–0 W PSAC Championship 9 14
1987 Frank Cignetti 10–2 6–0 W PSAC Championship
NCAA Division II playoffs
6 6
1988 Frank Cignetti 8–3 5–1 NCAA Division II playoffs 3 14
1989 Frank Cignetti 11–2 5–1 NCAA Division II playoffs 4 9
1990 Frank Cignetti 12–2 6–0 L NCAA Division II Championship 4 4
1991 Frank Cignetti 12–1 6–0 NCAA Division II playoffs 1 1
1992 Frank Cignetti 8–1–1 5–0–1 2 12
1993 Frank Cignetti 13–1 6–0 L NCAA Division II Championship 4 4
1994 Frank Cignetti 10–3 6–0 NCAA Division II playoffs 2 8
1995 Frank Cignetti 8–3 5–1 4 19
1996 Frank Cignetti 8–3 5–1 NCAA Division II playoffs 1 10
1997 Frank Cignetti 5–5 4–2 11 NR
1998 Frank Cignetti 10–2 5–1 NCAA Division II playoffs 2 8
1999 Frank Cignetti 9–4 5–1 NCAA Division II playoffs 10 19
2000 Frank Cignetti 8–3 5–1 NCAA Division II playoffs 5 16
2001 Frank Cignetti 8–2 6–0 NCAA Division II playoffs 2 8
2002 Frank Cignetti 11–2 6–0 NCAA Division II playoffs 6 8
2003 Frank Cignetti 10–1 5–1 4 9
2004 Frank Cignetti 7–3 5–1 9 20
2005 Frank Cignetti 5–5 4–2 NR NR
'Frank Cignetti': 182–50–1 106–13–1
Lou Tepper (PSAC) (2006–2010)
2006 Lou Tepper 8–2 5–1 18 25
2007 Lou Tepper 9–3 5–1 NCAA Division II playoffs 18 18
2008 Lou Tepper 8–2 5–2 13 NR
2009 Lou Tepper 5–6 1–6 21 NR
2010 Lou Tepper 6–5 3–4 NR NR
Lou Tepper: 35–18 19–14
Curt Cignetti (PSAC) (2011–present)
2011 Curt Cignetti 7–3 5–2 NR NR
2012 Curt Cignetti 12–2 6–1 W PSAC Championship
NCAA Division II playoffs
7 7
2013 Curt Cignetti 9-2 5-2 NR NR
Curt Cignetti: 28–7 16–5
Total: 513–254–23 (since 1927)
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title
#Highest rank achieved.
°Final rank. Since 2000, the final rankings were released following the playoffs.
  • Beginning in 1934, a group of sportswriters recognized the best team amongst Pennsylvania's State Teachers Colleges. When the Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference was organized in 1951 a point system was used to determine the champion until 1960. In 1960, the conference champion was determined by a championship game between the top teams of the East and West Divisions. In 1987 the championship game was discontinued, and only division champions were recognized from 1988 until the championship was reinstated in 2008.[7]
  • References: Conference records and championships,[7] season records,[6] coaches records,[12] and rankings.[8]

Post-season appearances[edit]

NCAA Division II playoff game at Shepherd in 2007.
Date Opponent Site TV Result
1964 East Stroudsburg (PSAC Championship) L 14–27  
1965 East Stroudsburg (PSAC Championship) L 10–26  
1968 vs. Delaware Atlantic City Convention CenterAtlantic City, New Jersey (Boardwalk Bowl) ABC L 24–31  
1985 Bloomsburg (PSAC Championship) L 9–31  
1986 West Chester (PSAC Championship) W 20–6  
1987 West Chester (PSAC Championship) W 21–7  
at Central Florida Citrus BowlOrlando, Florida (NCAA Division II quarterfinals) L 10–12  
1988 Millersville Miller Stadium • Indiana, Pennsylvania (NCAA Division II first round) L 24–27  
1989 at Grand Valley State Lubbers StadiumAllendale, Michigan (NCAA Division II first round) W 34–24  
at Portland State Civic StadiumPortland, Oregon (NCAA Division II quarterfinals) W 17–0  
at Mississippi College Robinson–Hale Stadium • Clinton, Mississippi (NCAA Division II semifinals) L 24–27  
1990 Winston-Salem State Miller Stadium • Indiana, Pennsylvania (NCAA Division II first round) W 48–0  
Edinboro Miller Stadium • Indiana, Pennsylvania (NCAA Division II quarterfinals) W 14–7  
at Mississippi College Robinson–Hale Stadium • Clinton, Mississippi (NCAA Division II semifinals) W 27–8  
vs. North Dakota State Braly Municipal StadiumFlorence, Alabama (NCAA Division II Championship) ESPN L 11–51  
1991 Virginia Union Miller Stadium • Indiana, Pennsylvania (NCAA Division II first round) W 56–7  
Shippensburg Miller Stadium • Indiana, Pennsylvania (NCAA Division II quarterfinals) W 52–7  
at Jacksonville State Paul Snow StadiumJacksonville, Alabama (NCAA Division II semifinals) L 20–27  
1993 at Ferris State Top Taggart Field • Big Rapids, Michigan (NCAA Division II first round) W 28–21  
at New Haven Robert B. Dodds Stadium • New Haven, Connecticut (NCAA Division II quarterfinals) W 38–35  
North Dakota Miller Stadium • Indiana, Pennsylvania (NCAA Division II semifinals) W 21–6  
at North Alabama Braly Municipal Stadium • Florence, Alabam (NCAA Division II Championship) ESPN L 34–41  
1994 Grand Valley State Miller Stadium • Indiana, Pennsylvania (NCAA Division II first round) W 35–27  
at Ferris State Big Rapids, Michigan (NCAA Division II quarterfinals) W 21–17  
at Texas A&M–Kingsville Javelina StadiumKingsville, Texas (NCAA Division II semifinals) L 20–46  
1996 at Ferris State Top Taggart Field • Big Rapids, Michigan (NCAA Division II first round) L 23–24  
1998 Shepherd Miller Stadium • Indiana, Pennsylvania (NCAA Division II first round) L 6–9  
1999 at Slippery Rock N. Kerr Thompson StadiumSlippery Rock, Pennsylvania (NCAA Division II first round) W 27–20 OT 
at Millersville Biemesderfer Stadium • Millersville, Pennsylvania (NCAA Division II quarterfinals) W 26–21  
at Northwest Missouri State Bearcat StadiumMaryville, Missouri (NCAA Division II semifinals) L 12–20  
2000 at Northwood Hantz Stadium • Midland, Michigan (NCAA Division II first round) L 0–28  
2001 at Saginaw Valley State Wickes Memorial Stadium • University Center, Michigan (NCAA Division II first round) L 32–33  
2002 Saginaw Valley State Miller Stadium • Indiana, Pennsylvania (NCAA Division II first round) W 27–23  
at Grand Valley State Lubbers Stadium • Allendale, Michigan (NCAA Division II quarterfinals) L 21–62  
2007 at West Chester Farrell Stadium • West Chester, Pennsylvania (NCAA Division II first round) WIUP-TV W 45–35  
at Shepherd Ram StadiumShepherdstown, West Virginia (NCAA Division II quarterfinals) WIUP-TV L 34–41  
2012 Shippensburg Miller StadiumIndiana, Pennsylvania (PSAC Championship) PCN W 41-10  
Shepherd Miller StadiumIndiana, Pennsylvania (NCAA Division II first round) IUP-TV W 27-17  
at New Haven Ralph F. DellaCamera Stadium • New Haven, Connecticut (NCAA Division II second round) W 17-14  
at Winston-Salem State Bowman Gray StadiumWinston-Salem, North Carolina (NCAA Division II Quarterfinals) L 17-21  

NFL draft picks[edit]

Through the 2010 NFL Draft, seven Crimson Hawks players have been selected in the NFL Draft. The first selected was Dave Smith in 1970 by the Pittsburgh Steelers, while the highest-selected thus far was Jim Haslett, by the Buffalo Bills in 1979.[13]

Notes[edit]

  • a Includes PSAC Championships from 1960–1987 and since 2008, a Boardwalk Bowl appearance in 1968, and Division II playoffs since 1987.
  • b From 1988 to 2007, the PSAC did not hold a championship game and only named Division champions.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Associated Press (AP)" (PDF). All-Americans. Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Retrieved October 12, 2009. 
  2. ^ a b Deas, Tommy (January 21, 2011). "Cignetti to be named IUP coach". The Tuscaloosa News. Retrieved January 21, 2011. 
  3. ^ http://profootballresearchers.org/Articles/Three_As.pdf
  4. ^ a b Van Atta, Robert B. (1980). "Latrobe, Pa.: Cradle of Pro Football" (PDF). Professional Football Researchers Association. Retrieved 13 October 2009. 
  5. ^ http://profootballresearchers.org/Articles/Five_Hundred_Reasons.pdf
  6. ^ a b c "All Time Scores" (PDF). Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Retrieved 14 October 2008. [dead link]
  7. ^ a b c d e "PSAC Football History" (PDF). Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference. Retrieved 14 October 2009. 
  8. ^ a b "Postseason and Rankings" (PDF). Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Retrieved 23 October 2009. [dead link]
  9. ^ a b Fulton, Bob (2006). "Geography Lesson". IUP Magazine. Retrieved 24 October 2009. 
  10. ^ Fulton, Bob (2006). "Full Circle". IUP Magazine. Retrieved 24 October 2009. 
  11. ^ Mackall, Dave (December 18, 2010). "IUP dismisses football coach Tepper after 6-5 season". Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. Retrieved January 21, 2011. 
  12. ^ "Coaching Records" (PDF). Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Retrieved 14 October 2008. [dead link]
  13. ^ "NFL Draft History - By School". National Football League. Retrieved April 27, 2010. 

External links[edit]