I Believe (Frankie Laine song)

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"I Believe"
Song
Written1953
Songwriter(s)

"I Believe" is a popular song written by Ervin Drake, Irvin Graham, Jimmy Shirl and Al Stillman in 1953.

"I Believe" was commissioned and introduced by Jane Froman on her television show, and became the first hit song ever introduced on TV. Froman, troubled by the uprising of the Korean War in 1952 so soon after World War II, asked Drake, Graham, Shirl and Stillman to compose a song that would offer hope and faith to the populace.[1] Froman's commercial recording reached No. 11 in the Billboard charts during a 10-week stay. [2] "I Believe" has been recorded by many others, and has become both a popular and religious standard.

Frankie Laine's version spent eighteen non-consecutive weeks at the top of the UK Singles Chart.[3] Laine also had the most successful version in the USA, where he reached #2 for three weeks. [4]

Other notable recordings[edit]

Quodlibet with Ave Maria[edit]

In 1972, Shawnee Music published a new arrangement of "I Believe" that includes a quodlibet with Bach/Gounod, "Ave Maria". This version is frequently performed by choirs at Christmas time.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stone, Ilene (2003). Jane Froman: Missouri's First Lady of Song. Columbia, Missouri: University of Missouri Press. p. 82. ISBN 0826214584.
  2. ^ Whitburn, Joel (1986). Joel Whitburn's Pop Memories 1890-1954. Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin: Record Research Inc. p. 166. ISBN 0-89820-083-0.
  3. ^ Myers, Justin (23 March 2018). "The songs that spent the longest at Number 1". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 4 September 2018.
  4. ^ Whitburn, Joel (1986). Joel Whitburn's Pop Memories 1890-1954. Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin: Record Research Inc. p. 265. ISBN 0-89820-083-0.
  5. ^ "allmusic.com". allmusic.com. Retrieved January 8, 2019.
  6. ^ Roberts, David (2005). British Hit Singles & Albums (18th ed.). London: Guinness World Records. p. 42. ISBN 1-904994-00-8.
  7. ^ "allmusic.com". allmusic.com. Retrieved January 8, 2019.
  8. ^ "allmusic.com". allmusic.com. Retrieved January 8, 2019.
  9. ^ "allmusic.com". allmusic.com. Retrieved January 8, 2019.
  10. ^ "allmusic.com". allmusic.com. Retrieved January 8, 2019.
  11. ^ "Perry Como Discography". kokomo.ca. Retrieved January 8, 2019.
  12. ^ Rosalsky, Mitch (2000). Encyclopedia of Rhythm & Blues and Doo Wop Vocal Groups. Scarecrow Press. ISBN 0-8108-3663-7.
  13. ^ "45worlds.com". 45worlds.com. Retrieved January 8, 2019.
  14. ^ "Discogs.com". Discogs.com. Retrieved January 8, 2019.
  15. ^ "allmusic.com". allmusic.com. Retrieved January 8, 2019.
  16. ^ "allmusic.com". allmusic.com. Retrieved January 8, 2019.
  17. ^ "allmusic.com". allmusic.com. Retrieved January 8, 2019.
  18. ^ "45cat.com". 45cat.com. Retrieved January 8, 2019.
  19. ^ Clemente, John (2013). Girl Groups -- Fabulous Females Who Rocked The World. Authorhouse. ISBN 978-1-4772-7633-4.
  20. ^ Roberts, David (2005). British Hit Singles & Albums (18th ed.). London: Guinness World Records. p. 427. ISBN 1-904994-00-8.
  21. ^ "Discogs.com". Discogs.com. Retrieved January 8, 2019.
  22. ^ "45worlds.com". 45worlds.com. Retrieved January 8, 2019.
  23. ^ "allmusic.com". allmusic.com. Retrieved January 8, 2019.

External links[edit]