I Just Want to Be Your Everything

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"I Just Want to Be Your Everything"
Single by Andy Gibb
from the album Flowing Rivers
B-side "In the End"
Released May 1977
Format 7"
Recorded Criteria Studios, Miami, Florida
October 1976
Genre Disco, funk
Length 3:45 (album version)
3:32 (single edit)
Label RSO
Writer(s) Barry Gibb
Producer(s) Gibb-Galuten-Richardson
Andy Gibb singles chronology
"Words and Music"
(1975)
"I Just Want to Be Your Everything"
(1977)
"(Love Is) Thicker Than Water"
(1977)

"I Just Want to Be Your Everything" is a song recorded by Andy Gibb, initially released in 1977. It reached number 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for three weeks, starting on the week ending 30 July 1977, and again for the week ending 17 September 1977. It was Gibb's first single released in the United Kingdom and United States. His previous single, "Words and Music" was only released in Australia. It is ranked number 26 on Billboard's 55th anniversary All Time Top 100 list.[1]

Writing and recording[edit]

"I Just Want to Be Your Everything" was written by Barry Gibb in Bermuda as well as "(Love Is) Thicker Than Water" with Andy Gibb credited as co-writer on the latter.[2] It was recorded in October 1976, the sessions were produced mainly by Albhy Galuten and Karl Richardson and with Barry on this track and "(Love Is) Thicker than Water", Galuten also played keyboards and piano. Eagles guitarist Joe Walsh contributed guitar on this song.[3] The track is a fairly dramatic love song, with the singer declaring his unending passion and stating that without her, he would die.[4]

Andy reveals, "'I Just Want to Be Your Everything' was one of the most meaningful of all form, you know". He later recalls on Barry Gibb's writing style:[5]

"So, once we discussed it all and got the deal together, me and Barry locked ourselves in a bedroom and Barry just started writing. When Barry writes, it is very hard to collaborate with him, because he is so quick. And before I knew it he was starting to do the chorus of ['I Just Want to Be Your Everything'], and I thought, 'Wow what a hook!'. He's an expert at his craft. Within about 20 minutes, he'd written a number one record; and then we went right into another one, ['(Love Is) Thicker than Water'][5]

Two mixes were prepared for the song, the more popular mix was released on the album & as the single version and the earlier mix was used for promotional uses. The promotional version had an additional keyboard that at times competed with the lead vocal. The drummer's high-hat count during both breakdowns was completely mixed out and Gibb's harmony vocal is more prevalent during add-libs.

Release[edit]

The song spent a cumulative four weeks at No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100. The song first reached the top of the chart on July 30 for the first of three consecutive weeks. Then, The Emotions went to No. 1 with "Best of My Love" on August 20 for the first of four straight weeks. However, the song maintained strong popularity, remaining in the Top 10 before returning to No. 1 for one final week on September 17. "Everything" then fell out of the top spot for good, being replaced once again by "Best of My Love." The song enjoyed one of the longest Top 40 runs in the Billboard Hot 100 to that time; its 23-week run spanned from the end of May through the end of October. Billboard ranked it as the No. 2 song for 1977.[6] The song also appeared on the Soul Singles Chart, peaking at number 19.

Personnel[edit]

Chart performance[edit]

Connie Smith's version[edit]

"I Just Want to Be Your Everything"
Single by Connie Smith
from the album New Horizons
Released October 1977
Format 7"
Recorded 1977
Genre Country, Country pop
Length 3:16
Label Monument Records
Writer(s) Barry Gibb
Connie Smith singles chronology
"Coming Around"
(1977)
"I Just Want to Be Your Everything"
(1977)
"Lovin' You Baby"
(1978)

The best-known cover version of "I Just Want to Be Your Everything" was recorded by American country music artist Connie Smith. Released in the autumn of 1977, Smith's version, according to AMG reviewer Stephen Thomas Erlewine, was "relatively faithful" to Gibb's version[18] and — given its disco-influenced sound — also a departure from her honky-tonk songs of the 1960s and early 1970s.[18]

"I Just Want to Be Your Everything" peaked at #14 on Billboard Magazine's Hot Country Songs chart in 1978, becoming her last significant hit, as her further hits for Monument Records, such as "Lovin' You Baby" and "They'll Never Be Another for Me," peaked in progressively lower positions on the country chart between 1978 and 1979.[18]

Chart performance[edit]

Chart (1978) Peak
position
US Billboard Hot Country Singles[19] 14
Canadian RPM Country Tracks[20] 23

Other versions[edit]

  • Bunny Maloney recorded this song in a reggae version in 1979, produced by Harry Mudie on Gull Records, released only in the United Kingdom backed by "Ethiopia".[21]
  • Thea Austin recorded this song (1997), on the single release includes the extended mix, club dub, Irene Eats Thunderpass Dub (mixed by DJ Irene and Thunderpuss) and Barry Harris Tribal Trip (mixed by Barry Harris) on Priority Records.[22]
  • The Best Pessimist recorded this song in 2009 and released on the album of the same name.[23]
  • Kimberley Locke of American Idol season 2 covered this song for the Bee Gees themed week (Top 4).
  • Jason Castro of American Idol season 7 covered this song on the show for the 70's themed week.
  • In the early 80's, cuban duet Maggie Carlés and Luis Nodal (Maggie y Luis) covered the song under the name "Solo por ti" (Only for you), keeping the rhythm with different lyrics wrote by them.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bronson, Fred (2 August 2012). "Hot 100 55th Anniversary: The All-Time Top 100 Songs". Billboard. Retrieved 9 August 2013. 
  2. ^ "Island Ignited Bee Gees’ Musical "Fever"". Bernews. Retrieved 11 June 2013. 
  3. ^ Brennan, Joseph. "Gibb Songs: 1976". Retrieved 11 June 2013. 
  4. ^ "Andy Gibb - I Just Want to Be Your Everything Songfacts". Songfacts. Retrieved 11 June 2013. 
  5. ^ a b Hughes, Andrew. The Bee Gees - Tales of the Brothers Gibb. Retrieved 2 February 2015. 
  6. ^ Billboard Year-End Hot 100 singles of 1977
  7. ^ David Kent (1993). Australian Charts Book 1970—1992. Australian Chart Book Pty Ltd, Turramurra, N.S.W. ISBN 0-646-11917-6. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f "Songs Written by the Gibb Family on the International Charts" (PDF). brothergibb.org. Retrieved 31 December 2014. 
  9. ^ "CAN Charts > Andy Gibb". RPM. Retrieved 2013-05-20. 
  10. ^ "Andy Gibb - I Just Want to Be Your Everything". chart.org.nz. Retrieved 30 December 2014. 
  11. ^ "Andy Gibb Chart History". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 30 December 2014. 
  12. ^ "Andy Gibb - Chart History". Billboard. Retrieved 30 December 2014. 
  13. ^ "Andy Gibb - Chart History on the Adult Contemporary Charts". Billboard. Retrieved 30 December 2014. 
  14. ^ "US Charts > Andy Gibb". Billboard. Retrieved 2013-05-20. 
  15. ^ "Cashbox Magazine: July 30, 1977". Cashbox. Retrieved 31 December 2014. 
  16. ^ "Billboard Easy Listening Charts Singles". Billboard Magazine. 24 December 1977. Retrieved 30 December 2014. 
  17. ^ Bronson, Fred (2 August 2012). "Hot 100 55th Anniversary: The All-Time Top 100 Songs". Billboard. Retrieved 9 August 2013. 
  18. ^ a b c [1] Erlewine, Stephen Thomas, Greatest Hits on Monument by Connie Smith, Allmusic
  19. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2008). Hot Country Songs 1944 to 2008. Record Research, Inc. pp. 387–388. ISBN 0-89820-177-2. 
  20. ^ "Search results for "Connie Smith"". RPM. Retrieved 2009-07-31. 
  21. ^ "Bunny Maloney – I Just Want To Be Your Everything". Discogs. Retrieved 11 June 2013. 
  22. ^ "Thea Austin – I Just Want To Be Your Everything". Discogs. Retrieved 2013-09-13. 
  23. ^ "Best Pessimist – I Just Want To Be Your Everything". Discogs. Retrieved 11 June 2013. 

See also[edit]

  • Whitburn, Joel, "Top Country Songs: 1944-2005," 2006.
  • Whitburn, Joel, "Top Pop Singles: 1955-2006," 2007.

External links[edit]

Preceded by
"I Feel Love" by Donna Summer
Australia ARIA Singles Chart number-one single
17 October – 28 November 1977
Succeeded by
"You're in My Heart" by Rod Stewart
Preceded by
"I'm in You" by Peter Frampton
Canadian RPM number-one single
6 August – 20 August 1977
Succeeded by
Whatcha Gonna Do? by Pablo Cruise
Preceded by
"Looks Like We Made It" by Barry Manilow
"Best of My Love" by The Emotions
Billboard Hot 100 number one single
July 30 – August 13, 1977
17 September 1977
Succeeded by
"Best of My Love" by The Emotions
"Best of My Love" by The Emotions
Preceded by
"I'm in You" by Peter Frampton
Cash Box Top 100 number-one single
30 July – 13 August 1977
Succeeded by
"Best of My Love" by The Emotions