Ian Black (footballer, born 1924)

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Ian Black
Personal information
Full name Ian Henderson Black[1]
Date of birth (1924-03-27)27 March 1924
Place of birth Aberdeen, Scotland
Date of death 13 December 2012(2012-12-13) (aged 88)[1]
Place of death Kingston upon Thames, England
Height 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)[2]
Playing position(s) Goalkeeper
Youth career
Aberdeen Boys' Brigade
St Clement's (Aberdeen)
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1944–1947 Aberdeen 0 (0)
1947–1950 Southampton 97 (0)
1950–1959 Fulham 263 (1)
1959–1962 Bath City
1962–1964 Canterbury City
National team
1948 Scotland 1 (0)
Teams managed
1966 Brentford (caretaker)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Ian Henderson Black (27 March 1924 – 13 December 2012) was a Scottish professional football goalkeeper who made over 260 appearances in the Football League for Fulham. He also played for Southampton and was capped by Scotland at international level.

Club career[edit]

A goalkeeper, Black's early career with Aberdeen was disrupted by the Second World War, during which he made guest appearances for both Southampton and Chelsea and he won the South Final of the Football League War Cup with the latter.[3] In December 1947 he was transferred to Second Division club Southampton and made 104 appearances for the club.[1][4]

In July 1950, Black transferred to First Division club Fulham, in exchange for Hugh Kelly and made 282 appearances for the club.[2][5] In July 1959,[4] he moved down to the Southern League to play for Bath City, with whom he won the Premier Division championship and the Somerset Premier Cup in 1959–60.[6] After making 143 appearances,[6] Black moved to Canterbury City and retired in 1964.[3] After his retirement from football, Black served as youth team manager (and in 1966, as caretaker manager of the first team) at Brentford, as an advisor to Redhill and secretary at Tolworth.[5][7][8]

International career[edit]

Black was capped on one occasion by Scotland, in a 2–0 defeat to England on 10 April 1948.[3]

Personal life[edit]

Black served in the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers during the Second World War.[9] After leaving football, Black ran a sports shop in Tolworth with former teammate Eddie Lowe and represented Surrey at bowls.[10]

Statistics[edit]

Player[edit]

Appearances and goals by club, season and competition
Club Season League FA Cup Total
Division Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Southampton 1947–48[11] Second Division 17 0 4 0 21 0
1948–49[11] 41 0 1 0 42 0
1949–50[11] 39 0 2 0 41 0
Total 97 0 7 0 104 0
Fulham 1950–51[4] First Division 42 0 5 0 47 0
1951–52[4] 39 0 1 0 40 0
1952–53[4] Second Division 37 1 1 0 38 1
1953–54[4] 32 0 3 0 35 0
1954–55[4] 27 0 0 0 27 0
1955–56[4] 34 0 2 0 36 0
1956–57[4] 37 0 2 0 39 0
1957–58[4] 15 0 0 0 15 0
Total 263 0 19 0 282 0
Career total 360 0 26 0 386 0

Manager[edit]

Managerial record by team and tenure
Team From To Record Ref
P W D L Win %
Brentford (caretaker) 18 April 1966 2 May 1966 3 1 1 1 033.3 [7]
Total 3 1 1 1 033.3

Honours[edit]

Bath City

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Ian Black". Barry Hugman's Footballers. Retrieved 20 February 2017.
  2. ^ a b Holley, Duncan; Chalk, Gary (1992). The Alphabet of the Saints. ACL & Polar Publishing. pp. 194–195. ISBN 0-9514862-3-3.
  3. ^ a b c Ian Black at the Scottish Football Association
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Ian Black". Fulhamweb. Retrieved 22 August 2019.
  5. ^ a b "Ian Black: 1924–2012 | Fulham Football Club". www.fulhamfc.com. Retrieved 8 October 2018.
  6. ^ a b c "Past Players – B". Bath City FC. Retrieved 22 August 2019.
  7. ^ a b White, Eric, ed. (1989). 100 Years Of Brentford. Brentford FC. pp. 260–262, 388. ISBN 0951526200.
  8. ^ Bull, David (17 December 2012). "Ian Black: An Appreciation". Southampton FC. Retrieved 17 December 2012.
  9. ^ "Aberdeen Football Club Heritage Trust – Player Profile". www.afcheritage.org. Retrieved 22 August 2019.
  10. ^ "Ian Black". HeraldScotland. Retrieved 8 October 2018.
  11. ^ a b c "Ian Black". 11v11.com. Retrieved 22 August 2019.

External links[edit]