Ian Cooper (violinist)

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Ian Cooper
IanCooperViolinist.jpg
Background information
Birth name Ian Cooper
Born (1970-08-14) 14 August 1970 (age 46)
Origin Mona Vale, Sydney, Australia
Genres Jazz, Gypsy, Classical, Irish, Country
Occupation(s) Musician
Instruments Violin, Viola
Years active 1986 – present
Website iancooper.com

Ian Cooper (born 14 August 1970) is an Australian violinist. He was commissioned to compose and perform the "Tin Symphony" for the opening ceremony of the Games of the XXVII Olympiad[1] in Sydney. The event was televised worldwide with an estimated 2.85 billion viewers. He performs many musical styles including Classical, Gypsy,[2] Jazz,[3] Irish & Country music and has appeared with Tommy Emmanuel,[4] James Morrison,[5] Olivia Newton-John, Barry White, Simon Tedeschi,[6] Deni Hines, and Silverchair.

Background[edit]

Cooper began learning the violin at age 4 from his mother Jan Cooper, a Suzuki Violin teacher. He performed the Seitz Violin Concerto No. 2 Allegro Moderato at age 6 on the Seven Network's 11AM program with Roger Climpson. At age 7, Cooper performed concerts in the USA and Canada, representing Australia at the Suzuki Violin World Conference. At age 8, he was awarded a scholarship to the New South Wales Conservatorium of Music[7] in Sydney where he studied with Christopher Kimber, Harry Curby, and Laslo Kiss. He was subsequently awarded a music scholarship to Knox Grammar School where he also studied drums and percussion. At age 10, a performance in Japan was broadcast on NHK Television.

In 1990, Cooper was mentored by the French Jazz Violinist Stéphane Grappelli. After performing with the guitarist Tommy Emmanuel at his invitation at the Sydney Opera House in 1992, Cooper joined Emmanuel on tour until 1997. Cooper has also been a member of trumpeter James Morrison's sextet since 2007.

Instruments[edit]

Cooper's main violin was made by E.H. Roth in Markneukirchen, Germany in 1926 and is modelled on an Antonio Stradivari 1714 Cremona instrument. His electric violins are Epoch,[8] Guscott and E.F. Keebler.

Discography[edit]

Awards and recognition[edit]

  • 1999 – MO Award – Variety Instrumental Performer of the year[10]
  • 1999 – ACE Award – Instrumental Act of the year[11]
  • 2000 – MO Award – Variety Instrumental Performer of the year[12]
  • 2000 – ACE Award – Instrumentalist of the year[13]
  • 2005 – Golden Fiddle Award – Best CD by a fiddler as soloist
  • 2006 – Golden Fiddle Award – Best fiddler soloist[14]
  • 2006 – Golden Fiddle Award – Best CD by a fiddler as soloist, for "Ian Cooper – Big Band"[15]
  • 2014 – Golden Fiddle Award – Best fiddler as a soloist
  • 2014 – Golden Fiddle Award – Best Band for Ian Cooper's International Spectacular
  • 2016 – ACE Award – Instrumental Performer[16]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Games of the XXVII Olympiad 2000". Music from the Opening Ceremony. Sony Music, BMG Australia Limited. September 2000. Archived from the original on 31 December 2010. Retrieved 18 August 2011. 
  2. ^ "Gypsy Passion Plays in Three Easy Pieces". Ian Cooper – "Ian's World". Sydney Morning Herald. 13 November 1995. Retrieved 18 August 2011. 
  3. ^ "Brisbane Jazz Festival". Ian Date & Ian Cooper. Jazz Queensland. 28 November 2010. Retrieved 18 August 2011. 
  4. ^ "Tommy Emmanuel & Ian Cooper". On Stage. The Whole Guitarist. Retrieved 18 August 2011. 
  5. ^ "James Morrison & Ian Cooper". James Morrison and Ian Cooper. Blue Mountains Concert Society. 29 April 2011. Retrieved 18 August 2011. 
  6. ^ "Simon Tedeschi & Ian Cooper on ABC Radio". Simon Tedeschi & Ian Cooper. 702 ABC Radio Sydney. 4 October 2009. Retrieved 18 August 2011. 
  7. ^ "Alumni" (PDF). Sydney Conservatorium on Music. Sydney University. 22 March 2011. Retrieved 19 August 2011. 
  8. ^ "Epoch Players". Epoch Musical Instruments. Epoch Strings. Retrieved 18 August 2011. 
  9. ^ "La Brava Music". Ian Cooper – Ballads and Bossa Nova. La Brava Music. 2009. Retrieved 19 August 2011. 
  10. ^ "MO Awards". Variety Instrumental Performer of the year. MO Awards. 1999. Retrieved 19 August 2011. 
  11. ^ "Instrumental Act of the year". Australian Club Entertainment Awards. 1999. Retrieved 19 August 2011. 
  12. ^ "MO Awards". Variety Instrumental Performer of the year. MO Awards. 2000. Retrieved 19 August 2011. 
  13. ^ "ACE Awards". Instrumentalist of the year. Australian Club Entertainment Awards. 2000. Retrieved 19 August 2011. 
  14. ^ "Golden Fiddle Awards". Golden Fiddle Awards. 2006. Retrieved 19 August 2011. 
  15. ^ "Golden Fiddle Awards". Golden Fiddle Awards. 2006. Retrieved 19 August 2011. 
  16. ^ "ACE Award Winners 2016".