Ian Kirkpatrick

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For the South African rugby player, see Ian Kirkpatrick (South African rugby player). For the American music producer and songwriter, see Ian Kirkpatrick (producer).
Ian Kirkpatrick
Full name Ian Andrew Kirkpatrick
Date of birth (1946-05-24) 24 May 1946 (age 70)
Place of birth Gisborne, New Zealand
Height 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in)
Weight 102 kg (16 st 1 lb)
School King's College
Rugby union career
Playing career
Position Flanker
New Zealand No. 666
Provincial/State sides
Years Club / team Apps (points)
1966, 1970–79
1967–69
Poverty Bay
Canterbury
82
33
National team(s)
Years Club / team Apps (points)
1967–77 New Zealand 39 (57)

Ian Andrew Kirkpatrick MBE (born 24 May 1946) is a former New Zealand rugby union player, who was captain of the New Zealand team between 1972 and 1974.

Kirkpatrick began his first-class career in 1966 at the age of 20 playing for Poverty Bay. One year later he moved to Christchurch and established himself in the Canterbury team. Later that year, he made his international debut for the All Blacks against France in Paris.

Over the next ten years, Kirkpatrick would appear for the All Blacks in 39 test matches (9 as captain), scoring 16 tries which would remain a national record until Stu Wilson surpassed this total in 1983. In 1971, he was a part of the President's Overseas XV that was chosen to play against England to celebrate the centenary of the Rugby Football Union.

His domestic career was extensive, and he scored 115 tries in his 289 first-class games, becoming one of the few forwards to reach the century. He was also the only man to have captained both islands: the South in 1969 in his last season with Canterbury and then the North (in 1972–73) when he had returned home to Poverty Bay. He also appeared in 33 Ranfurly Shield matches for Canterbury.

In the 1980 Queen's Birthday Honours, Kirkpatrick was appointed a Member of the Order of the British Empire for services to rugby.[1] In 2003, he was inducted into the International Rugby Hall of Fame.

References[edit]

  1. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 48214. p. 41. 14 June 1980. Retrieved 28 March 2016.

External links[edit]

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Colin Meads
All Blacks Captain
1972–1973
Succeeded by
Andy Leslie