Ian Temby

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Ian Temby
AO, QC
1st Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions
In office
8 March 1984 (1984-03-08) – 1988 (1988)
Succeeded by Mark Weinberg
1st Commissioner of the NSW Independent Commission Against Corruption
In office
13 March 1989 (1989-03-13) – 12 March 1994 (1994-03-12)
Succeeded by Barry O'Keefe
Personal details
Born Ian Douglas Temby
(1942-05-05) 5 May 1942 (age 76)[1]
Perth, Western Australia
Nationality Australia
Education Perth Modern School
Alma mater University of Western Australia
Profession Barrister

Ian Douglas Temby AO, QC (born 5 May 1942)[1] is an Australian barrister. He was the first Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions and the first Commissioner of the New South Wales Independent Commission Against Corruption. He conducted the Royal Commission into the Finance Broking Industry in Western Australia in 2001.[2]

Early life and education[edit]

Temby was educated at the Perth Modern School and the University of Western Australia, where he earned an LL.B. (Hons.), graduating in 1964.[1]

Career[edit]

Temby was admitted to legal practice on 23 December 1966 and joined the Perth law firm Northmore Hale Davey and Leake in the same year.[3] He was called to the Bar in Perth in 1978 and was appointed Queen's Counsel on 16 July 1980.[3] He was the President of the Law Society of Western Australia in 1982–1983[1] and the President of the Law Council of Australia in 1983–1984.[4]

He served as the inaugural Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions from 1984 to 1989,[5] and as the inaugural Commissioner of the New South Wales Independent Commission Against Corruption from 1989 to 1994.[6]

Temby has been in private practice in Sydney since 1 May 1994.[3] He is the Founding Head of Chambers at 3 St James' Hall Chambers.[7]

In 2004, he was appointed an Officer of the Order of Australia for service to the law, particularly in developing the role of the independent prosecutor in the Australian criminal justice system.[8]

In 2008, he became a member of the Council of the New South Wales Bar Association. In 2009, he was the Treasurer of the Association.

In 2015, he acted for Archbishop Philip Wilson[9] in relation to a charge of covering up child sexual abuse.[10] In 2017, he appeared in three cases for the New South Wales Crime Commission.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d National Library of Australia. "Papers of Ian Temby, 1972–2000". Retrieved 2 December 2017. 
  2. ^ Temby, Ian (December 2001). Royal Commission into the Finance Broking Industry (PDF) (Report). Retrieved 2 December 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c "Ian Temby AO QC". 3 St James' Hall Chambers. Retrieved 2 December 2017. 
  4. ^ "Our presidents". Law Council of Australia. Retrieved 2 December 2017. 
  5. ^ "Previous Directors". Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions. Retrieved 2 December 2017. 
  6. ^ "History". Independent Commission Against Corruption (New South Wales). Retrieved 2 December 2017. 
  7. ^ "Our barristers". 3 St James' Hall Chambers. Retrieved 2 December 2017. 
  8. ^ Officer of the Order of Australia (AO) entry for Ian Douglas Temby, Canberra, Australia: Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, 26 January 2004, https://www.itsanhonour.gov.au/honours/honour_roll/search.cfm?aus_award_id=1055960&showInd=true, "For service to the law, particularly in developing the role of the independent prosecutor in the Australian criminal justice system." 
  9. ^ Hough, Andrew (18 March 2015). "Ian Temby QC: the '$1000 an hour' barrister who will defend Catholic Archbishop Philip Wilson against sex abuse cover up claims". Adelaide Now. Retrieved 2 December 2017. 
  10. ^ Wilson v Director of Public Prosecutions (NSW) [2017] NSWCA 128.
  11. ^ New South Wales Crime Commission v Chen [2017] NSWSC 943; New South Wales Crime Commission v Dinh [2017] NSWSC 1305; New South Wales Crime Commission v Lee [2017] NSWSC 1503.

External links[edit]

Legal offices
New title Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions
1984–1988
Succeeded by
Mark Weinberg
New title Commissioner of the
New South Wales Independent Commission Against Corruption

1989–1994
Succeeded by
Barry O'Keefe