Ibrahim Bin Shakaran

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Ibrahim Bin Shakaran
Born (1979-08-04) August 4, 1979 (age 37)
Casablanca, Morocco
Died 2014
Syria
Citizenship Morocco
Detained at Guantanamo
Alternate name Brahim Benchekroun
ISN 587
Charge(s) No charge, extrajudicial detention
Status Repatriated

Ibrahim Bin Shakaran was a citizen of Morocco who was held in extrajudicial detention in the United States's Guantanamo Bay detention camps, in Cuba.[1] His Guantanamo Internment Serial Number was 587.

Ibrahim Bin Shakaran was repatriated to Moroccan custody on July 31, 2004, on the eve of the first Combatant Status Review Tribunals.[2] The three other men were Mohammed Ibrahim Awzar, Mohammed Mizouz, and Radwan al Shakouri. The four were all charged by Moroccan authorities; then released on bail. The BBC reports a fifth man, Abdellah Tabarak was repatriated with the four others.[3]

He was reported to have lead an anti-Assad group, in Syria, named Sham al Islam, which was staffed mainly by fellow Moroccans.[4] He was reported to have died, fighting in Syria, in 2014.[5]

Association with Mana Shaman Allabardi Al Tabi[edit]

The Summary of Evidence memo prepared for Mana Shaman Allabardi Al Tabi's first annual Administrative Review Board, on July 18, 2005 stated:[6]

  1. One of the individuals the detainee was arrested with was named Ibrahim Bin Shakaran.
  2. Ibrahim Bin Shakran trained at the al Farouk training camp and fought on the Taliban front lines.

Formerly secret Joint Task Force Guantanamo assessment[edit]

On April 25, 2011, whistleblower organization WikiLeaks published formerly secret assessments drafted by Joint Task Force Guantanamo analysts.[7][8] His 2 page Joint Task Force Guantanamo assessment was drafted on December 13, 2003.[9] It was signed by camp commandant Major General Geoffrey D. Miller. He recommended continued detention.

Moroccan arrest[edit]

According to Fox News "Brahim Benchekroun" and Mohammed Mazouz, and fifteen other Moroccans who were not former Guantanamo captives, were rounded up on November 11, 2005.[10]

Defense Intelligence Agency claims he "returned to terrorism"[edit]

The Defense Intelligence Agency asserted Ibrahim Bin Shakaran had "returned to terrorism".[11] The DIA reported:

Death[edit]

Bin Shakaran, under the transliteration of his name "Brahim Benchekroun", was killed in Syria in 2014.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ OARDEC. "List of Individuals Detained by the Department of Defense at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba from January 2002 through May 15, 2006" (PDF). United States Department of Defense. Archived (PDF) from the original on September 30, 2007. Retrieved May 15, 2006.  Works related to List of Individuals Detained by the Department of Defense at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba from January 2002 through May 15, 2006 at Wikisource
  2. ^ OARDEC (October 9, 2008). "Consolidated chronological listing of GTMO detainees released, transferred or deceased" (PDF). Department of Defense. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 20, 2008. Retrieved December 28, 2008. 
  3. ^ "Guantanamo sends Moroccans home". BBC. August 2, 2004. Archived from the original on May 26, 2009. 
  4. ^ Bill Roggio (April 4, 2014). "Former Guantanamo detainee killed while leading jihadist group in Syria". Long War Journal. Retrieved February 29, 2017. Bin Shakaran, who is also known as Abu Ahmad al Maghribi, Abu Ahmad al Muhajir, and Brahim Benchekroune, was “martyred, Insha’Allah, in battles for Hilltop # 45 in Latakia,” according to Kavkaz Center, a propaganda arm of the Islamic Caucasus Emirate.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  5. ^ Bill Roggio "Former Guantanamo detainee killed while leading jihadist group in Syria" Long War Journal April 4, 2014. "Bin Shakaran, who is also known as Abu Ahmad al Maghribi, Abu Ahmad al Muhajir, and Brahim Benchekroune, was “martyred, Insha’Allah, in battles for Hilltop # 45 in Latakia,” according to Kavkaz Center, a propaganda arm of the Islamic Caucasus Emirate."
  6. ^ OARDEC (July 18, 2005). "Unclassified Summary of Evidence for Administrative Review Board in the case of Al Tabi, Mana Shaman Allabardi" (PDF). United States Department of Defense. pp. pages 55–56. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 3, 2007. Retrieved November 6, 2007. 
  7. ^ Christopher Hope, Robert Winnett, Holly Watt, Heidi Blake (April 27, 2011). "WikiLeaks: Guantanamo Bay terrorist secrets revealed -- Guantanamo Bay has been used to incarcerate dozens of terrorists who have admitted plotting terrifying attacks against the West – while imprisoning more than 150 totally innocent people, top-secret files disclose". The Telegraph (UK). Archived from the original on July 13, 2012. Retrieved July 13, 2012. The Daily Telegraph, along with other newspapers including The Washington Post, today exposes America’s own analysis of almost ten years of controversial interrogations on the world’s most dangerous terrorists. This newspaper has been shown thousands of pages of top-secret files obtained by the WikiLeaks website. 
  8. ^ "WikiLeaks: The Guantánamo files database". The Telegraph (UK). April 27, 2011. Archived from the original on June 26, 2015. Retrieved July 10, 2012. 
  9. ^ "Ibrahim Bin Shakaran - Guantanamo Bay detainee file on Ibrahim Bin Shakaran, US9MO-000587DP, passed to the Telegraph by Wikileaks". -The Telegraph. April 27, 2011. Retrieved April 5, 2017. 
  10. ^ "Morocco Dismantles Terror Network, Arrests 17". Fox News. November 20, 2005. Retrieved March 1, 2008. 
  11. ^ "Fact Sheet: Former GTMO Detainee Terrorism Trends" (PDF). Defense Intelligence Agency. June 13, 2008. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 28, 2010. Retrieved July 26, 2008. According to testimony presented at the trial, Bin Shakaran had already recruited other jihadists when Moroccan authorities broke up the plot in November 2005. Bin Shakaran received a 10-year sentence for his role in the plot, while Mizouz received a two-year sentence. 
  12. ^ Ilhem Rachidi (April 11, 2017). "Return of the radicals: The fate awaiting Moroccan militants". Middle East Eye. Archived from the original on April 11, 2017. Retrieved April 11, 2017. Benchekroun - who was killed in Syria in 2014 - was accused of fighting in Afghanistan following his arrest in 2002 in Pakistan and imprisoned in Bagram, Kandahar, then Guantanamo in 2004, from where he was transferred to Morocco. He was released in 2005, only to be arrested again months later accused of recruiting combatants for Iraq.