Ibrahim Hussein (runner)

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Ibrahim Kipkemboi Hussein (born June 1958 in Kapsabet, Rift Valley) is a retired long-distance runner from Kenya, who was a three-time winner of the Boston Marathon in 1988, 1991, and 1992. He was also the winner of the New York City Marathon in 1987, and multiple other marathons in his years. He and his wife Zainab Ibrahim are both alumni at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, NM. Ibrahim Hussein is among many athletes on the hall of fame in New Mexico. The couple have five children, Hussein Ibrahim, Farida Ibrahim, Hadija Ibrahim, Jamal Ibrahim and Warda Ibrahim.

Ibrahim Hussein was the first Kenyan (and also the first African) to win Boston, setting a world record and having books written on his legacy. Since his 1988 win, the Kenyans have come to dominate Boston. In fact, Kenyans have won the race every year since 1988 with exceptions in 1989, 1990, 2001, 2005, 2009, 2013, 2014 and 2015. The only non-African to win Boston since 1988 were South Korean Lee Bong-Ju and Italian Gelindo Bordin.

He is now retired and owns Amedo Center, which is an apartment complex that comprises a restaurant, abe's pool place and an electronics shop. in Eldoret, Kenya, as well as many other properties in Kenya. He also runs a training camp for young Kenyan athletes who are given a chance to race alongside elite athletes. He was the chairman of Athletics Kenya North Rift branch.[1] He now holds one of only nine offices in the world at the Regional Development Center in Nairobi, after John Velzian's retirement. He works as a representative of English speaking countries in Africa, holding one of the important offices associated with International Association of Athletics Federation (IAAF), which is an athletic federation governing the sport of athletics.

His 1988 win in Boston was a photo finish with Juma Ikangaa. Hussein held off Ikangaa by a mere second. This was the closest Boston Marathon finish ever up until that point. There would be a closer finish in 2000 when Elijah Lagat won. Ikangaa would go on to finish second again in the next two Boston Marathons but would never win it.

He is the older brother of Mbarak Hussein, a naturalized U.S. citizen who is an elite Master's marathoner in his own right and who has two top five finishes himself in Boston (fifth in 2001 and fourth in 2002.) [2]

Hussein is a graduate of St. Patrick's High School (Iten, Kenya). And the University of New Mexico (Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA).

Achievements[edit]

Year Competition Venue Position Event Notes
Representing  Kenya
1985 Honolulu Marathon Honolulu, Hawaii 1st Marathon 2:12:08
1986 Honolulu Marathon Honolulu, Hawaii 1st Marathon 2:11:43
1987 New York City Marathon New York, United States 1st Marathon 2:11:01
Honolulu Marathon Honolulu, Hawaii 1st Marathon 2:18:26
1988 Boston Marathon Boston, United States 1st Marathon 2:08:43
Olympic Games Seoul, South Korea Marathon DNF
1990 Commonwealth Games Auckland, New Zealand 5th Marathon 2:13:20
1991 Boston Marathon Boston, United States 1st Marathon 2:11:06
1992 Boston Marathon Boston, United States 1st Marathon 2:08:14
Olympic Games Barcelona, Spain 37th Marathon 2:19:49

See also[edit]

References[edit]