Ice hockey at the 2014 Winter Olympics – Women's tournament

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Women's ice hockey
at the XXII Olympic Winter Games
Women's tournament, 2014 Winter Olympics, Gold medal team Canada.jpg
The gold medal winners pose for a team picture
VenuesBolshoy Ice Dome
Shayba Arena
Dates8–20 February 2014
Competitors168 from 8 nations
Medalists
1st, gold medalist(s)  Canada (4th title)
2nd, silver medalist(s)  United States
3rd, bronze medalist(s)   Switzerland
← 2010
2018 →

The women's tournament in ice hockey at the 2014 Winter Olympics was held in Sochi, Russia.

For the first time, the women's gold medal game was decided in overtime, with Canada defeating the United States 3–2. Switzerland defeated Sweden for their first Olympic ice hockey medal in 66 years, and first ever medal in the women's tournament. With the win, the Canadian women's national ice hockey team won its fourth consecutive gold medal, a feat only previously accomplished by the Soviet Union men's team in 1964–76, and the Canadian men's team in 1920–32.

Canadians Hayley Wickenheiser, Jayna Hefford and Caroline Ouellette became the first hockey players to win four Olympic gold medals. They also joined Soviet biathlete Alexander Tikhonov and German speed skater Claudia Pechstein as the only athletes to win gold medals in four straight Winter Olympics.[1]

On December 6, 2017 six Russian ice hockey players were disqualified for doping violations. Results of the Russian team were annulled.[2] The IIHF was requested to modify the results accordingly. Tatiana Burina and Anna Shukina were also disqualified ten days later.[3]

Qualification[edit]

Russia qualified as the host. Canada, the United States, Finland, Switzerland, and Sweden qualified as the top five teams in the IIHF World Ranking. Germany and Japan qualified via the qualification tournament.[4][5]

Rosters[edit]

Group A Group B

Officials[edit]

The IIHF selected six referees and nine linesmen to work the 2014 Winter Olympics. They were the following:[6]

Preliminary round[edit]

Format[edit]

The top four teams based on the 2012 IIHF World Ranking,[7] Canada, United States, Finland and Switzerland, competed in Group A, while the remaining four teams competed in Group B. The top two teams in Group A received a bye to the semifinals. In the quarterfinals, the third place team in Group A played the second place team in Group B, while the fourth placed team in Group A played the first place team in Group B. The winners advanced to the semifinals, while the two losers, and the third and fourth placed teams in Group B, competed in a classification bracket for places five through eight.[8] This format was introduced to create more competitive games in response to blowout victories in the previous Olympics where Canada and the United States outscored their competition by a cumulative 86–4 margin. It has been used in the IIHF Women's World Championship since 2012.[9]

Tiebreak criteria[edit]

In each group, teams were ranked according to the following criteria:[10]

  1. Number of points (three points for a regulation-time win, two points for an overtime or shootout win, one point for an overtime or shootout defeat, no points for a regulation-time defeat);
  2. In case two teams are tied on points, the result of their head-to-head match will determine the ranking;
  3. In case three or four teams are tied on points, the following criteria will apply (if, after applying a criterion, only two teams remain tied, the result of their head-to-head match will determine their ranking):
    1. Points obtained in head-to-head matches between the teams concerned;
    2. Goal differential in head-to-head matches between the teams concerned;
    3. Number of goals scored in head-to-head matches between the teams concerned;
    4. If three teams remain tied, result of head-to-head matches between each of the teams concerned and the remaining team in the group (points, goal difference, goals scored);
    5. Place in 2012 IIHF World Ranking.

All times are local (UTC+4).

Group A[edit]

Team
GP W OTW OTL L GF GA GD Pts
 Canada 3 3 0 0 0 11 2 +9 9
 United States 3 2 0 0 1 14 4 +10 6
 Finland 3 0 1 0 2 5 9 −4 2
  Switzerland 3 0 0 1 2 3 18 −15 1
8 February 2014
12:00
United States 3–1
(1–0, 2–0, 0–1)
 FinlandShayba Arena, Sochi
Attendance: 4,135
8 February 2014
17:00
Canada 5–0
(2–0, 3–0, 0–0)
  SwitzerlandShayba Arena, Sochi
Attendance: 4,386
10 February 2014
14:00
United States 9–0
(5–0, 1–0, 3–0)
  SwitzerlandShayba Arena, Sochi
Attendance: 3,812
10 February 2014
19:00
Finland 0–3
(0–0, 0–0, 0–3)
 CanadaShayba Arena, Sochi
Attendance: 4,837
12 February 2014
12:00
Switzerland  3–4 OT
(0–2, 2–1, 1–0)
(OT 0–1)
 FinlandShayba Arena, Sochi
Attendance: 4,211
12 February 2014
16:30
Canada 3–2
(0–0, 0–1, 3–1)
 United StatesShayba Arena, Sochi
Attendance: 4,812

Group B[edit]

Team
GP W OTW OTL L GF GA GD Pts
 Russia 3 3 0 0 0 9 3 +6 9
 Sweden 3 2 0 0 1 6 3 +3 6
 Germany 3 1 0 0 2 5 8 −3 3
 Japan 3 0 0 0 3 1 7 −6 0
9 February 2014
12:00
Sweden 1–0
(1–0, 0–0, 0–0)
 JapanShayba Arena, Sochi
Attendance: 2,928
9 February 2014
17:00
Russia 4–1
(0–0, 0–1, 4–0)
 GermanyShayba Arena, Sochi
Attendance: 5,048
11 February 2014
14:00
Germany 0–4
(0–1, 0–0, 0–3)
 SwedenShayba Arena, Sochi
Attendance: 4,015
11 February 2014
19:00
Russia 2–1
(1–0, 0–0, 1–1)
 JapanShayba Arena, Sochi
Attendance: 4,897
13 February 2014
12:00
Japan 0–4
(0–1, 0–1, 0–2)
 GermanyShayba Arena, Sochi
Attendance: 2,618
13 February 2014
21:00
Sweden 1–3
(0–1, 1–1, 0–1)
 RussiaShayba Arena, Sochi
Attendance: 5,092

Final round[edit]

Bracket[edit]

  Quarterfinals     Semifinals     Gold medal game
                           
        A1  Canada 3  
  A4   Switzerland 2     A4   Switzerland 1    
  B1  Russia 0         A1  Canada 3
      A2  United States 2
        A2  United States 6    
  A3  Finland 2     B2  Sweden 1   Third place
  B2  Sweden 4   A4   Switzerland 4
  B2  Sweden 3
Indicates overtime victory
Indicates shootout victory

Quarterfinals[edit]

The top two teams (A1–A2) received byes and were deemed the home team in the semifinals as they were seeded to advance.

15 February 2014
12:00
Finland 2–4
(0–0, 1–0, 1–4)
 SwedenShayba Arena, Sochi
Attendance: 2,917
15 February 2014
16:30
Switzerland  2–0
(1–0, 0–0, 1–0)
 RussiaShayba Arena, Sochi
Attendance: 4,962

Semifinals[edit]

Teams seeded A1 and A2 were the home teams.

17 February 2014
16:30
United States 6–1
(3–0, 2–0, 1–1)
 SwedenShayba Arena, Sochi
Attendance: 4,542
17 February 2014
21:00
Canada 3–1
(3–0, 0–1, 0–0)
  SwitzerlandShayba Arena, Sochi
Attendance: 3,378

Bronze medal game[edit]

20 February 2014
16:00
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Switzerland  4–3
(0–1, 0–1, 4–1)
 SwedenBolshoy Ice Dome, Sochi
Attendance: 8,263

Gold medal game[edit]

20 February 2014
21:00
1st, gold medalist(s) Canada 3–2 OT
(0–0, 0–1, 2–1)
(OT 1–0)
 United States 2nd, silver medalist(s)Bolshoy Ice Dome, Sochi
Attendance: 10,639

5–8th place bracket[edit]

 
5–8th place semifinalsFifth place game
 
      
 
 
 
 
 Finland2
 
 
 
 Germany1
 
 Finland4
 
 
 
 Russia0
 
 Russia6
 
 
 Japan3
 
Seventh place game
 
 
 
 
 
 Germany3
 
 
 Japan2

5–8th place semifinals[edit]

16 February 2014
12:00
Finland 2–1
(2–0, 0–1, 0–0)
 GermanyShayba Arena, Sochi
Attendance: 2,009
16 February 2014
21:00
Russia 6–3
(1–0, 3–2, 2–1)
 JapanShayba Arena, Sochi
Attendance: 4,793

Seventh place game[edit]

18 February 2014
12:00
Germany 3–2
(1–1, 2–0 , 0–1)
 JapanShayba Arena, Sochi
Attendance: 2,012

Fifth place game[edit]

18 February 2014
16:30
Finland 4–0
(2–0, 0–0, 2–0)
 RussiaShayba Arena, Sochi
Attendance: 4,112

Final rankings[edit]

The final rankings of the 2014 Winter Olympics Women's Ice Hockey Tournament are as follows:

Rank Team
1st, gold medalist(s)  Canada
2nd, silver medalist(s)  United States
3rd, bronze medalist(s)   Switzerland
4  Sweden
5  Finland
6  Germany
7  Japan
DSQ  Russia

Statistics[edit]

Scoring leaders[edit]

List shows the top skaters sorted by points, then goals.

Player GP G A Pts +/− PIM POS
Finland Michelle Karvinen 6 5 2 7 +4 4 F
Sweden Pernilla Winberg 6 3 4 7 +3 2 F
United States Amanda Kessel 5 3 3 6 +8 0 F
United States Hilary Knight 5 3 3 6 +1 6 F
United States Kendall Coyne 5 2 4 6 +8 2 F
United States Brianna Decker 5 2 4 6 +8 6 F
Russia Yekaterina Smolentseva 5 2 4 6 0 2 F
United States Alexandra Carpenter 5 4 1 5 −1 2 F
Germany Franziska Busch 5 3 2 5 −4 2 F
Canada Marie-Philip Poulin 5 3 2 5 +6 0 F

GP = Games played; G = Goals; A = Assists; Pts = Points; +/− = Plus/Minus; PIM = Penalties in Minutes; POS = Position
Source: IIHF.com

Leading goaltenders[edit]

Only the top five goaltenders, based on save percentage, who have played at least 40% of their team's minutes, are included in this list.

Player TOI GA GAA SA Sv% SO
Canada Shannon Szabados 187:30 3 0.96 65 95.38 1
Germany Viona Harrer 180:00 6 2.00 96 93.75 1
Finland Noora Räty 358:57 13 2.17 183 92.90 1
Sweden Valentina Wallner 269:16 13 2.90 152 91.45 1
Russia Anna Prugova 265:46 9 2.03 105 91.43 0

TOI = Time on Ice (minutes:seconds); SA = Shots Against; GA = Goals Against; GAA = Goals Against Average; Sv% = Save Percentage; SO = Shutouts

Source: IIHF.com

Tournament awards[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Poulin scores OT winner, Canada wins gold over U.S." The Sports Network. 2014-02-20. Retrieved 2014-02-20.
  2. ^ "IOC sanctions six Russian athletes and closes one case as part of the Oswald Commission findingsdate=December 12, 2017". olympic.org. Retrieved December 13, 2017.
  3. ^ "IOC sanctions 11 Russian athletes as part of Oswald Commission findings". International Olympic Committee. 2017-12-22. Retrieved 2017-12-22.
  4. ^ Archived IIHF page showing Russia qualifying as host
  5. ^ "2014 Olympic Winter Games". IIHF.com. Archived from the original on 7 February 2014. Retrieved 10 February 2013.
  6. ^ "Sochi officials named". IIHF. Archived from the original on 21 February 2014. Retrieved 19 February 2014.
  7. ^ "World Ranking Report". IIHF. Retrieved 15 February 2014.
  8. ^ "Tournament Format". IIHF. Retrieved 15 February 2014.
  9. ^ Pingue, Frank (7 February 2014). "PREVIEW-Olympics-Ice Hockey-IOC to watch new women's format with interest". Reuters. Retrieved 15 February 2014.
  10. ^ "Tournament Format". IIHF.com. Retrieved 29 January 2014.
  11. ^ "Three honours for Schelling". IIHF. 21 February 2014.

External links[edit]