2017 Icelandic parliamentary election

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Icelandic parliamentary election, 2017

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All 63 seats in the Althing
32 seats needed for a majority
Turnout201,777 (81.2% Increase2.0%)
  First party Second party Third party
  Bjarni Benediktsson vid Nordiska Radets session i Stockholm.jpg Katrín Jakobsdóttir (cropped).jpg Sigurður Ingi Jóhannsson 2016 (cropped).png
Leader Bjarni Benediktsson Katrín Jakobsdóttir Sigurður Ingi Jóhannsson
Party Independence Left-Green Progressive
Leader since 29 March 2009 24 February 2013 2 October 2016
Last election 21 seats, 29.0% 10 seats, 15.9% 8 seats, 11.5%
Seats won
16 / 63
11 / 63
8 / 63
Seat change Decrease5 Increase1 Steady
Popular vote 49,543 33,155 21,016
Percentage 25.2% 16.9% 10.7%
Swing Decrease3.8% Increase1.0% Decrease0.8%

  Fourth party Fifth party Sixth party
  Sigmundur Davíð Gunnlaugsson 2016 (cropped resized).jpg
Leader Logi Már Einarsson Sigmundur Davíð Gunnlaugsson Collective leadership[n 1]
Party Social Democratic Centre Pirates
Leader since 31 October 2016 24 September 2017 N/A
Last election 3 seats, 5.7% New party 10 seats, 14.5%
Seats won
7 / 63
7 / 63
6 / 63
Seat change Increase4 Increase7 Decrease4
Popular vote 23,652 21,335 18,051
Percentage 12.1% 10.9% 9.2%
Swing Increase6.4% Increase10.9% Decrease5.3%

  Seventh party Eighth party Ninth party
  Thorgerdur K. Gunnarsdottir, Islands kulturminister (cropped).jpg Óttarr Proppé, ESC2014 Meet & Greet (crop).jpg
Leader Inga Sæland Þorgerður Katrín Gunnarsdóttir Óttarr Proppé
Party People's Reform Bright Future
Leader since 27 January 2016 11 October 2017 31 January 2015
Last election 0 seats, 3.5% 7 seats, 10.5% 4 seats, 7.2%
Seats won
4 / 63
4 / 63
0 / 63
Seat change Increase4 Decrease3 Decrease4
Popular vote 13,502 13,122 2,394
Percentage 6.9% 6.7% 1.2%
Swing Increase3.4% Decrease3.8% Decrease6.0%

Icelandic general election 2017 - Results by Constituency.svg
Map of the election results, showing the seats won by each party in each of the 6 multi-member constituencies.

Prime Minister before election

Bjarni Benediktsson
Independence

Elected Prime Minister

Katrín Jakobsdóttir
Left-Green

Coat of arms of Iceland.svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Iceland
Constitution

Parliamentary elections were held in Iceland on 28 October 2017. On 15 September 2017, the three-party coalition government collapsed after the departure of Bright Future over a scandal involving Prime Minister Bjarni Benediktsson's father writing a letter recommending a convicted paedophile have his "honour restored".[1] Bjarni subsequently called for a snap election,[2] which was officially scheduled for 28 October 2017 following the dissolution of the Althing.

Though many opinion polls in the run-up to the election indicated an increase in support for the Left-Green Movement, the Independence Party retained its position as the Althing's largest party.[3] Following the election, four-party coalition talks led by the Left-Greens ensued; however, after the Progressive Party rejected the possibility, a three-party coalition led by the Left-Greens including the Independence Party and Progressive Party was negotiated. After formally receiving the mandate to form a coalition on 28 November, Left-Green leader Katrín Jakobsdóttir was designated Prime Minister to lead the new government on 30 November.

Background[edit]

A three-party coalition of the Independence Party, Reform Party and Bright Future had been put together after the 2016 election, which held a narrow majority of 1 seat in Parliament. The cabinet formed was led by Prime Minister Bjarni Benediktsson, head of the Independence Party.

The Icelandic legal system has a mechanism whereby a convicted individual can have their "honour restored", that is have certain civil rights restored, from five years after serving their sentence[4] if three letters of recommendation from persons of good character who know the individual are provided. Hjalti Sigurjón Hauksson was convicted in 2004 for multiple rapes of his stepdaughter from age five for twelve years. He served a jail term of five and a half years. Bjarni's father, Benedikt Sveinsson, was a friend of Hjalti Sigurjón's. Benedikt signed a letter of recommendation, which he said Hjalti Sigurjón brought to him already drafted. Bjarni was informed on this in July 2017 by the justice minister, Sigríður Á. Andersen, also of the Independence Party, but Benedikt's support was not revealed by the government at first.[5] Sigridur refused to say in public who had signed the letter at first, but was ordered to do so by a Parliamentary committee. Bjarni said it would have been illegal for him to reveal the information earlier.[6]

Benedikt's involvement emerged in September. Bright Future left the coalition, accusing the Independence Party of a "serious breach of trust". Benedikt apologised for signing the letter. Sigridur said she is preparing a bill to reform the restored honour system.[5]

Bjarni acknowledged the need for new elections, although the decision is made by the President, Guðni Thorlacius Jóhannesson. Other parties supported new elections,[6] although Birgitta Jónsdóttir, parliamentary chair of the Pirates, initially suggested a 5-party coalition government of the Pirate Party, the Reform Party, the Left-Greens, the Social Democrats and Bright Future should be explored. There had been unsuccessful discussions for such a coalition after the last election.[7]

According to poll conducted by Morgunblaðið, 57% of Icelanders believe calling the snap election was right.[8]

Candidates and campaign[edit]

The Pirate Party reject a traditional model of party leadership, but Birgitta Jónsdóttir co-founded the party and is often described as the party's informal leader.[9] She announced that she would not be standing in the election.[10] After Birgitta announced that she was not standing, Helgi Hrafn Gunnarsson announced that he would now be running to be an MP,[11] having earlier quit due to what he described as bullying by Birgitta.[12] The centre-right Independence and Reform Parties both campaigned on a platform of continuing their governmental efforts and retaining power in the Althing, as both parties were in coalition before the collapse of the previous parliament. Meanwhile, the Left-Green Movement sought an opportunity to govern for the first time since 2009 and implement ideologically leftist policies.[13]

Former Progressive Party Prime Minister Sigmundur Davíð Gunnlaugsson announced in an open letter that he planned to create a party before the elections. This decision was triggered by a leadership dispute amongst the Progressive Party, and led to the formation of the Centre Party on 24 September.[14] The party's platform was broadly similar to that of its predecessor, but was characterised by observers in the media as being "populist",[15] with a particular emphasis on reform of the banking sector and firms such as Íslandsbanki.[16]

Electoral system[edit]

The 63 members of the Althing are elected using closed list proportional representation in multi-member constituencies of 8 to 13 seats.[17] Of the 63 seats, 54 are elected using constituency results and determined using the d'Hondt method. The remaining nine supplementary seats are awarded to parties that crossed the 5% national electoral threshold in order to give them a total number of seats equivalent to their national share of the vote.[17]

Participating parties[edit]

Parties with a list for all constituencies[18]
Parties with a list for only some constituencies

The Icelandic National Front (right-wing/far-right) was going to take part in the election with list letter E, but has since withdrawn all its lists.[19]

Opinion polls[edit]

30 day (15 day from 2017-09-28) moving average of polls from the election in 2016 to the next

Poll source Fieldwork date Sample
size
D V P B C A S F M Others Lead
2017 election 28 Oct 2017 25.2 16.9 9.2 10.7 6.7 1.2 12.1 6.9 10.9 0.2 8.4
MMR 26–27 Oct 2017 980 21.3 16.6 11.0 11.7 8.1 2.2 12.5 4.4 11.4 0.9 4.7
Gallup 23–27 Oct 2017 3,848 25.3 17.3 9.0 8.9 8.2 1.5 15.5 4.0 9.7 0.6 8.0
Zenter 23–27 Oct 2017 962 22.5 19.6 9.6 9.6 7.1 1.9 14.7 4.3 10.2 0.7 2.9
Háskóli Íslands 22–25 Oct 2017 2,283 24.5 20.2 8.8 7.9 8.3 1.3 15.3 4.2 9.3 0.2 4.6
Fréttablaðið 23–24 Oct 2017 1,602 24.1 19.2 9.4 6.2 7.5 1.9 14.3 4.4 9.6 3.4 4.9
MMR 20–23 Oct 2017 979 22.9 19.9 9.3 8.6 5.5 1.8 13.5 4.7 12.3 1.3 3.0
Háskóli Íslands 16–19 Oct 2017 2,395 25.1 23.2 8.2 7.1 5.7 1.5 15.6 3.3 9.8 0.5 1.9
Gallup 13–19 Oct 2017 2,870 22.6 23.3 10.7 7.4 5.8 1.2 13.3 5.7 9.4 0.5 0.7
MMR 17–18 Oct 2017 1,007 19.9 19.1 11.9 8.0 6.7 1.6 15.8 5.3 11.0 0.8 0.8
Fréttablaðið 16 Oct 2017 806 22.2 27.0 10.0 7.5 5.0 2.1 10.4 3.7 10.7 1.4 4.8
Háskóli Íslands 9–12 Oct 2017 1,250 22.6 27.4 9.2 5.5 3.4 2.6 15.3 6.5 6.4 1.1 4.8
Gallup 29 Sep–12 Oct 2017 3,876 23.7 23.0 8.8 7.2 4.8 3.0 13.4 5.7 9.5 0.9 0.7
MMR 6–11 Oct 2017 966 21.1 21.8 10.5 5.9 3.6 4.2 13.0 7.4 10.7 1.8 0.7
Fréttablaðið 10 Oct 2017 804 22.2 29.9 8.5 7.1 3.3 3.6 8.3 6.1 9.2 1.8 7.7
Háskóli Íslands 2–6 Oct 2017 1,083 20.7 28.2 9.1 5.5 3.1 2.7 10.8 9.0 9.5 1.4 7.5
Fréttablaðið 2–3 Oct 2017 800 22.3 28.6 11.4 5.5 3.0 2.6 10.6 5.8 8.9 1.4 6.3
MMR 26–28 Sep 2017 1,012 23.5 24.7 10.0 6.4 4.9 2.5 10.4 8.5 7.3 1.7 1.2
Háskóli Íslands 25–28 Sep 2017 952 24.3 28.8 11.6 7.0 4.8 4.3 7.5 6.5 4.6 0.6 4.5
Gallup 15–28 Sep 2017 4,092 23.1 25.4 10.3 9.9 3.6 4.6 9.3 10.1 2.0 1.6 2.3
Háskóli Íslands 19–21 Sep 2017 908 23 30 10 11 6 3 8 9 0 7
Fréttablaðið 18 Sep 2017 800 23.0 22.8 13.7 10.4 5.2 7.1 5.1 10.9 1.8 0.2
Zenter 15–18 Sep 2017 956 26.4 22.8 12.5 10.5 2.7 5.6 9.0 9.8 0.8 3.6
Gallup 14 Sep 2017 N/A 23.6 24.4 9.8 10.4 5.2 4.4 9.1 11.6 1.5 0.8
MMR 4 Sep 2017 N/A 25.9 19.2 13.8 9.7 7.3 3.0 9.6 9.1 2.4 6.7
Gallup 10–30 Aug 2017 4,108 26.3 19.5 13.1 10.8 4.8 2.8 9.7 10.6 2.4 6.8
MMR 15–18 Aug 2017 955 24.5 20.5 13.5 10.1 6.0 3.6 10.6 6.7 4.5 4.0
Gallup 12–31 Jul 2017 3,827 26.5 21.2 12.9 11.4 5.3 3.7 9.1 8.4 1.5 5.3
MMR 18–21 Jul 2017 909 29.3 20.4 13.3 9.6 4.6 2.4 10.6 6.1 3.6 8.9
Gallup 15 Jun–2 Jul 2017 2,870 27.5 21.5 14.2 11.3 5.6 3.3 9.2 3.8 3.6 6.0
MMR 21 Jun 2017 N/A 28.4 22.6 13.3 10.2 5.3 3.3 9.1 2.8 5.0 5.8
MMR 6–14 Jun 2017 974 24.9 20.6 13.7 13.4 5.2 2.9 11.3 2.8 5.2 4.3
Gallup 3–31 May 2017 7,133 25.6 24.3 12.9 11.0 6.2 3.4 9.4 4.2 3.0 1.3
MMR 11–16 May 2017 943 25.6 21.4 14.1 12.2 5.5 3.4 9.3 3.6 5.0 4.2
Gallup 30 Mar–1 May 2017 8,206 26.4 24.0 13.1 10.9 6.9 4.4 8.3 3.7 3.3 2.4
MMR 11–26 Apr 2017 926 25.2 23.4 12.8 11.1 5.0 3.2 10.6 3.2 5.4 1.8
Gallup 2–30 Mar 2017 5,798 29.2 24.5 10.3 10.5 6.0 6.0 8.3 2.8 2.4 4.7
Fréttablaðið 20–21 Mar 2017 791 32.1 27.3 14.3 7.0 3.1 3.8 8.8 3.6 4.8
MMR 6–13 Mar 2017 921 25.4 23.5 13.7 11.4 5.5 5.0 8.8 3.7 3.0 1.9
Gallup 1–28 Feb 2017 5,557 27.6 24.3 12.0 10.7 5.4 6.4 8.3 2.4 2.9 3.3
MMR 17–24 Feb 2017 928 26.9 23.9 11.6 12.2 6.3 5.2 8.0 2.5 3.4 3.3
MMR 10–15 Feb 2017 983 24.4 27.0 11.9 10.7 6.2 5.4 10.0 2.6 1.8 2.6
MMR 1–5 Feb 2017 983 23.8 27.0 13.6 9.7 5.6 5.3 7.8 3.6 3.6 3.2
Gallup 5–29 Jan 2017 4,288 28.0 22.8 13.4 10.5 5.3 7.2 7.3 3.3 2.2 5.2
MMR 12–26 Jan 2017 910 24.6 22.0 13.6 12.5 6.8 7.0 7.0 3.6 2.9 2.6
MMR 3–10 Jan 2017 954 26.1 24.3 14.6 10.9 6.9 6.3 6.4 2.1 2.4 1.8
Gallup 1–29 Dec 2016 4,192 29.0 20.0 14.6 8.9 7.4 8.7 7.5 2.2 1.7 9.0
MMR 26 Dec 2016 N/A 29.3 20.7 12.7 10.2 7.0 9.1 6.9 2.2 1.9 8.6
MMR 14 Dec 2016 N/A 29.6 21.6 14.1 9.1 5.6 8.9 6.3 1.6 3.2 8.0
Fréttablaðið 12–14 Dec 2016 791 31.8 17.0 13.1 9.7 10.1 10.8 5.6 1.9 14.8
MMR 1 Dec 2016 N/A 26.1 20.5 15.6 8.0 7.8 9.8 6.6 1.9 3.7 5.6
Gallup 10–29 Nov 2016 5,207 28.0 20.9 13.7 9.0 8.9 8.6 5.3 3.0 2.6 7.1
MMR 7–14 Nov 2016 904 26.0 20.7 11.9 9.4 10.6 9.6 5.6 3.4 2.8 5.3
2016 election 29 Oct 2016 29.0 15.9 14.5 11.5 10.5 7.2 5.7 3.5 2.2 13.1

If a sample size was not provided for the poll, only the given (Gallup) or end (MMR) date was provided by the polling firm.

Results[edit]

The Independence Party retained its position as the Althing's largest party. However, the Independence Party's parliamentary representation decreased by five seats to 16 and it lost its governing majority. The Left-Green Movement retained its position as the Althing's second largest party, increasing its representation by one seat to 11. The Social Democratic Alliance saw a large increase in support, doubling its vote share from 2016, and will enter the new parliament with seven members. The Progressive Party held steady at eight seats while the newly formed Centre Party, founded by former Progressive Prime Minister Sigmundur Davíð Gunnlaugsson, won seven seats. The Pirate Party, which entered the election as the Althing's third largest party, lost four seats and was reduced to six seats. Entering the Althing for the first time, the People's Party obtained four seats. The Reform Party, one of the members of the outgoing government, lost three seats and was left with four seats. In line with all pre-election polling, Bright Future did not meet the 5% threshold and was therefore not returned to the Althing.

New Iceland Althingi 2017.svg

Party Votes % Seats +/–
Independence Party D 49,543 25.2 16 –5
Left-Green Movement V 33,155 16.9 11 +1
Social Democratic Alliance S 23,652 12.1 7 +4
Centre Party M 21,335 10.9 7 New
Progressive Party B 21,016 10.7 8 0
Pirate Party P 18,051 9.2 6 –4
People's Party F 13,502 6.9 4 +4
Reform Party C 13,122 6.7 4 –3
Bright Future A 2,394 1.2 0 –4
People's Front of Iceland R 375 0.2 0 0
Dawn T 101 0.1 0 0
Invalid/blank votes 5,531
Total 201,777 100 63 0
Registered voters/turnout 248,502 81.2
Source: Morgunblaðið (Icelandic) Iceland Monitor (English)
Popular vote
D
25.25%
V
16.89%
S
12.05%
M
10.87%
B
10.71%
P
9.20%
F
6.88%
C
6.69%
A
1.22%
Others
0.24%
Parliamentary seats
D
25.40%
V
17.46%
B
12.70%
S
11.11%
M
11.11%
P
9.52%
F
6.63%
C
6.63%

Government formation[edit]

Four-party coalition talks[edit]

On 30 October, President Guðni Th. Jóhannesson met with the leaders of the eight parliamentary parties.[20] Before meeting with Guðni, Left-Green leader Katrín Jakobsdóttir stated that she wanted to become Prime Minister, and did not exclude the possibility of cooperation with any party.[21] Þórhildur Sunna Ævarsdóttir, representing the Pirates, voiced her party's support for Katrín to receive the mandate to form a government, did not rule out an alliance with the Centre or People's Party, but indicated that it was not her first choice,[22] and did not rule out an alliance with the Independence Party but did not envisage one to be possible.[23] Inga Sæland said that the People's Party remained unbound, but alluded to the similarities between her party and Sigmundur Davíð Gunnlaugsson's Centre Party;[24] however, though Sigmundur suggested that the two parties would ally to address shared issues,[25] Inga stated she was not aware of any such alliance.[26]

The four former opposition parties held informal talks,[27] with their leaders meeting by chance on 30 October. Logi Már Einarsson, leader of the Social Democratic Alliance, told Guðni it was natural for Katrín to receive the mandate to form a government if she so requested. He did not rule out an alliance with the Independence Party, but said that the two parties were starkly different,[28] adding that it was natural for the opposition to have the chance to lead given the government's losses in the election.[29] The Progressive Party was in pole position to determine whether the Independence Party or the Left-Greens would lead the next government,[30] and after the election reiterated its opposition to a referendum on EU membership.[31] Progressive leader Sigurður Ingi Jóhannsson also expressed reluctance to governing with the Centre Party.[32] After meeting with Guðni, Katrín declared that she wanted to form a government with the four former opposition parties,[33] noting that though a coalition with additional parties would provide more than 32 seats, doing so would not be necessary before a four-party coalition was first attempted.[34]

After holding talks with party leaders, President Guðni Th. Jóhannesson on 2 November granted Katrín Jakobsdóttir, leader of the Left-Green Movement, the mandate to form a coalition between her party, the Progressives, Social Democratic Alliance, and Pirates,[35] the four having agreed in the morning to begin formal coalition talks,[36] which started the following day.[37] On 6 November, the leadership of the Progressive Party determined that the four-party coalition would hold too slim a majority to form the basis for cooperation between them on major issues,[38] and the Pirates recommended in a press release that a government with a larger majority be formed;[39] the early failure of negotiations was also attributed to the Progressives' distrust of the Pirates in supporting a government with such a slim majority. As such, Katrín met Guðni in the afternoon,[40] after first announcing to the press that she would return her mandate.[41] Guðni subsequently announced that he would discuss alternative possibilities to form a government with the party leaders,[42] with speculation about a possible rapprochement between the Progressive Party and Centre Party sparked by a call between their chairmen over the weekend.[43]

Three-party coalition talks[edit]

In the following days, the leaders of the Left-Greens, Independence Party, and Progressive Party discussed the possibility of forming a coalition together, with the Left-Greens insistent that Katrín become prime minister in that case,[44] an idea supported by the Progressives;[45] in exchange, demissionary prime minister Bjarni Benediktsson would be appointed finance minister.[46] At a meeting of Left-Green parliamentarians on 13 November, 9 voted in support and 2 against opening formal talks with the Independence Party, the two opposed being Andrés Ingi Jónsson and Rósa Björk Brynjólfsdóttur.[47] The youth organisation of the Left-Greens announced its vehement opposition to governing with the Independence Party,[48] and dozens of the party's members renounced their membership in protest.[49] The coalition is the first including the Independence Party and the farthest left party represented in the Althing since the period from 1944 to 1947, when it governed alongside the People's Unity Party – Socialist Party.[50]

Talks concluded swiftly, and after meeting with Katrín on 28 November, Guðni formally granted her the mandate to lead a government with the Independence Party and Progressive Party, pending the support of each of the parties, with the new government seated on 30 November,[51] after party committees approved the government agreement.[52]

Further reading[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ The Pirate Party rejects the regular leadership model. Their formal chairperson for the 2017-18 period is Halldóra Mogensen

References[edit]

  1. ^ Milne, Richard (15 September 2017). "Paedophile rehabilitation scandal brings down Iceland's coalition". Financial Times. Retrieved 15 September 2017.
  2. ^ Henley, Jon (15 September 2017). "Row over sexual abuse letter brings down Iceland's government". The Guardian. Retrieved 15 September 2017.
  3. ^ "FINAL RESULTS: General Elections in Iceland bring a complicated political landscape". Iceland Monitor. Retrieved 29 October 2017.
  4. ^ "ANALYSIS: Government falls in shocking scandal involving one of Iceland's most notorious child abuse cases". Icelandmag.visir.is. Retrieved 23 September 2017.
  5. ^ a b "Paedophile furore wrecks Iceland coalition". Bbc.co.uk. 15 September 2017. Retrieved 23 September 2017.
  6. ^ a b Thorsson, Elias (16 September 2017). "Iceland government collapses after paedophile scandal". Smh.com.au. Retrieved 23 September 2017 – via The Sydney Morning Herald.
  7. ^ "Parliament Divided Over New Elections - The Reykjavik Grapevine". Grapevine.is. 15 September 2017. Retrieved 23 September 2017.
  8. ^ "Left Green Movement leads the polls". Retrieved 27 September 2017.
  9. ^ Iceland’s ‘Pirate Party’ Is Now The Biggest Political Party MintPress News, 19 May 2016
  10. ^ "Birgitta gefur ekki kost á sér áfram". Ruv.is. 16 September 2017. Retrieved 23 September 2017.
  11. ^ "Stjórnmál eru í eðli sínu svolítið ógeðsleg". Mbl.is. Retrieved 23 September 2017.
  12. ^ "Samskiptin eins og í ofbeldissambandi". Mbl.is. Retrieved 23 September 2017.
  13. ^ correspondent, Jon Henley European affairs (29 October 2017). "Iceland election: centre-right parties lose majority". The Guardian – via www.theguardian.com.
  14. ^ "Former PM Sigmundur Davíð Gunnlaugsson to form new party before the elections". Retrieved 27 September 2017.
  15. ^ Martyn-Hemphill, Richard (28 October 2017). "Iceland Goes to Polls Amid Scandals, Disgust and Distrust". The New York Times.
  16. ^ "Iceland's ex-leader poised for political resurrection". 27 October 2017.
  17. ^ a b Union, Inter-Parliamentary. "IPU PARLINE database: ICELAND (Althingi), Electoral system". Ipu.org. Retrieved 23 September 2017.
  18. ^ "Ellefu framboð þar sem þau eru flest". 13 October 2017.
  19. ^ Stígur Helgason (14 October 2017). "Þjóðfylkingin dregur alla lista sína til baka". ruv.is (in Icelandic). Ríkisútvarpið. Retrieved 19 October 2017.
  20. ^ Ásrún Brynja Ingvarsdóttir (29 October 2017). "Forsetinn boðar forystumenn á sinn fund". RÚV. Retrieved 3 November 2017.
  21. ^ Jóhann Ólafsson (29 October 2017). "Langar að verða forsætisráðherra". Morgunblaðið. Retrieved 3 November 2017.
  22. ^ Hulda Hólmkelsdóttir (30 October 2017). "Telja réttast að Katrín fái umboðið". Vísir. Retrieved 3 November 2017.
  23. ^ "Píratar vilja að Katrín fái umboð". Morgunblaðið. 30 October 2017. Retrieved 3 November 2017.
  24. ^ Baldur Guðmundsson (30 October 2017). "Inga segir flokkinn óbundinn". Morgunblaðið. Retrieved 3 November 2017.
  25. ^ Baldur Guðmundsson (30 October 2017). "Í bandalag með Flokki fólksins". Morgunblaðið. Retrieved 3 November 2017.
  26. ^ Hulda Hólmkelsdóttir (30 October 2017). "Kannast ekki við bandalag með Miðflokknum". Vísir. Retrieved 3 November 2017.
  27. ^ "„Afslappað og ágætt svona"". Morgunblaðið. 31 October 2017. Retrieved 3 November 2017.
  28. ^ Hulda Hólmkelsdóttir (30 October 2017). "Formenn stjórnarandstöðuflokkanna hittust fyrir tilviljun á Alþingi í morgun". Vísir. Retrieved 3 November 2017.
  29. ^ Baldur Guðmundsson (30 October 2017). "Engin bindandi niðurstaða". Morgunblaðið. Retrieved 3 November 2017.
  30. ^ Brynjólfur Þór Guðmundsson (30 October 2017). "Framsókn í lykilaðstöðu". RÚV. Retrieved 3 November 2017.
  31. ^ Einar Þorsteinsson (31 October 2017). "Framsókn samþykkir ekki ESB-atkvæðagreiðslu". RÚV. Retrieved 3 November 2017.
  32. ^ Heimir Már Pétursson (31 October 2017). "Framsókn ræður miklu um mögulegt stjórnarsamstarf til hægri og vinstri". Vísir. Retrieved 3 November 2017.
  33. ^ Hulda Hólmkelsdóttir (30 October 2017). "Katrín byrjuð að ræða ríkisstjórnarsamstarf við hina stjórnarandstöðuflokkana". Vísir. Retrieved 3 November 2017.
  34. ^ Sólrún Lilja Ragnarsdóttir (1 November 2017). "Þarf að ákveða að fara áfram eða hætta". Morgunblaðið. Retrieved 3 November 2017.
  35. ^ "Katrín komin með umboðið". Morgunblaðið. 2 November 2017. Retrieved 2 November 2017.
  36. ^ Elín Margrét Böðvarsdóttir (2 November 2017). "Katrín mætt á fund forseta". Morgunblaðið. Retrieved 3 November 2017.
  37. ^ Sigurður Bogi Sævarsson (3 November 2017). "Málefnunum skipt í tvennt". Morgunblaðið. Retrieved 3 November 2017.
  38. ^ Agnes Bragadóttir; Sólrún Lilja Ragnarsdóttir (6 November 2017). "Stjórnarmyndunarviðræðum slitið". Morgunblaðið. Retrieved 6 November 2017.
  39. ^ "Augljóst að bjóða fleirum að borðinu". Morgunblaðið. 6 November 2017. Retrieved 6 November 2017.
  40. ^ "Katrín fer á fund Guðna". Morgunblaðið. 6 November 2017. Retrieved 6 November 2017.
  41. ^ Sólrún Lilja Ragnarsdóttir (6 November 2017). "Katrín skilar forsetanum umboðinu". Morgunblaðið. Retrieved 6 November 2017.
  42. ^ "Guðni ræðir við aðra formenn". Morgunblaðið. 6 November 2017. Retrieved 6 November 2017.
  43. ^ "Þingmönnum fjölgar ekki í viðræðum". Morgunblaðið. 6 November 2017. Retrieved 6 November 2017.
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