Citrus ichangensis

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Ichang papeda)
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Citrus ichangensis
Ichangfruit.jpg
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Sapindales
Family: Rutaceae
Genus: Citrus
Species: C. ichangensis
Binomial name
Citrus ichangensis

Citrus ichangensis, the Ichang papeda (Chinese: 宜昌橙), is a slow-growing species of papeda that has characteristic lemon-scented foliage and flowers.

It is native to southwestern and west-central China[1] and is likely named for the city of Yichang (宜昌), in China's Hubei province. It is sometimes referred to as Citrus × ichangensis.

The Ichang papeda's main claim to fame is its unusual hardiness. With the exception of Poncirus trifoliata, it is the hardiest citrus plant, tolerating both moderate frost and damp conditions.[2] For this reason, it is perhaps the only species of true citrus which can be reliably grown outside in the temperate areas of Europe and the United States.

Description[edit]

Relatively rare in cultivation, the Ichang papeda is a large shrub or small tree, growing to 3-4.5 m,[3] and produces a small, mandarin-like fruit. Leaves feature a broad petiole, and resemble the leaves of the yuzu and the Kaffir lime in appearance. The fruit has a fragrant, but rugged rind, and may be oval, spherical, or flattened in shape, ripening to yellow or orange. The fruit contains many large monoembryonic seeds and a small quantity of bitter or sour juice; some fruits lack juice entirely and are instead filled with a mass of pith and seeds.

The Ichang papeda is occasionally grown as an ornamental.

Hybrids[edit]

Both the shangjuan and the yuzu have a number of culinary uses and are notably cold-hardy.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Khan, Iqrar Ahmad (2007). Citrus genetics, breeding and biotechnology. CAB International. p. 27. ISBN 978-0-85199-019-4.
  2. ^ a b c Spiegel-Roy, Pinchas; Goldschmidt, Eliezer E. (1996). Biology of citrus. Cambridge University Press. p. 32. ISBN 978-0-521-33321-4.
  3. ^ Hogan, Sean (2008). Trees for all seasons: broadleaved evergreens for temperate climates. Timber Press. p. 79. ISBN 978-0-88192-674-3.