Ida Goodson

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Ida Goodson
Piano player Ida Goodson.jpg
Background information
Born (1909-11-23)November 23, 1909
Pensacola, Florida, United States
Died January 5, 2000(2000-01-05) (aged 90)
Pensacola, Florida, United States
Genres Classic female blues, jazz[1]
Occupation(s) Singer, pianist
Instruments Vocals, piano
Years active 1920s–2000
Associated acts Billie Pierce

Ida Goodson (November 23, 1909 – January 5, 2000)[2] was an American classic female blues and jazz singer plus pianist.

Biography[edit]

Goodson was born in Pensacola, Florida, the youngest of seven sisters, six of whom survived to adulthood. Her father and mother both played piano.[2] Her father was deacon at Pensacola's Mount Olive Baptist Church.[1]

All of the daughters received tuition in music, with the sole intention of them performing in church.[1] Indeed, Goodson noted that the blues were banned in her house.[3] However, Ida, Mabel, Della, Sadie, Edna, and Wilhemina (more commonly known as Billie Pierce), all subsequently had careers in either blues or jazz.[4] The Preservation Hall Jazz Band often had one of the Goodson sisters playing keyboards. Goodson herself played the piano for accompaniment to silent films and at dances.[1]

The Florida Folk Archive released a recording taken at the Florida Folk Festival in 1980, comprising a duet between Ida and Sadie Goodson. She received a Florida Folk Heritage Award in 1987.[2][4]

In 2002 a stage show, The Goodson Sisters: Pensacola's Greatest Gift to Jazz, focused on Ida, Wilhemia, and Sadie Goodson. The Wild Women Don't Have the Blues PBS video included rare footage of Bessie Smith and her one-time accompanist, Goodson. Music journalist Chris Heim stated in the Chicago Tribune; "Sprightly blues and gospel performer Ida Goodson - the scene stealer of the film - gives a stunning exhibition of the intimate connection between gospel and blues when she takes the song "Precious Lord" from a rich, slow gospel opening to a rollicking boogie-woogie conclusion."[5]

In her senior years, Goodson played organ at several churches in Pensacola.[1][4] An album was released by the Florida Folklife Program, Ida Goodson: Pensacola Piano—Florida Gulf Blues, Jazz, and Gospel.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Chadbourne, Eugene. "Ida Goodson". Allmusic. Retrieved February 16, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b c "Piney Flatwoods Girl: Ida Goodson: Florida Blueswoman". Pineyflatwoodsgirl.blogspot.com. 2007-09-08. Retrieved 2014-01-26. 
  3. ^ Grosz, Elizabeth (1995). Sexy Bodies: the strange carnalities of feminism (1st ed.). London: Routledge. p. 234. ISBN 0-415-09802-5. 
  4. ^ a b c d "Folk Heritage Awards Recipient: IDA GOODSON - Florida Folklife Program - Preservation - Florida Division of Historical Resources". Dhr.dos.state.fl.us. Retrieved 2014-01-26. 
  5. ^ "The Classic Blues, 1900-1920s". Calliope.org. 2009-01-01. Retrieved 2014-01-26.