Iglesia Presbiteriana San Andrés (Centro)

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Iglesia Presbiteriana San Andrés del Centro
Iglesia Presbiteriana Centro.jpg
old image of the original facade of St. Andrew
Religion
AffiliationPresbyterian
RiteProtestant
PatronAndrew the Apostle
Location
LocationBelgrano 579, Monserrat, Buenos Aires
CountryArgentina
Architecture
Architect(s)Edwin Arthur Merry
Charles Raynes
Typeneo-Gothic
Date established1829
Completed1896

Iglesia Presbiteriana San Andrés del Centro (St. Andrew’s Scotch Presbyterian Church) is a Presbyterian temple of the city of Buenos Aires.[1] It is located in the vicinity of Otto Wulff building, neighborhood of Monserrat.[2]

History[edit]

Originally this church was founded to assist the Scottish community of Buenos Aires, being his first Minister William Brown, who was in charge until 1850.[3] The ancient temple was located on Piedras Street, current Avenida de Mayo, neighborhood of Monserrat.[4]

Towards 1890 began the works for the construction of a new temple located on Avenida Belgrano, between Peru and Bolivar Streets. The project was entrusted to the British architects, Edwin Arthur Merry and Charles Raynes, who completed the work in 1896. The original tower was demolished in 1950 due to the widening of Belgrano Avenue. His current facade dates from 1962.[5]

Iglesia Presbiteriana San Andrés began to offer services in Spanish since 1912, charge that was entrusted to Minister José Felices, born in Spain.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Iglesias reformadas neogóticas en Buenos Aires y alrededores. Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras.
  2. ^ Historias en voz baja de la avenida Belgrano. Clarín.
  3. ^ Los evangélicos en la América latina, siglo XIX, los comienzos. La Aurora, 1956.
  4. ^ Anales, Temas21-24. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Instituto de Arte Americano e Investigaciones Estéticas.
  5. ^ Revista Iglesia Presbiteriana San Andres. Iglesia Presbiteriana San Andrés (Buenos Aires, Argentina).
  6. ^ Revista Iglesia Presbiteriana San Andres. Iglesia Presbiteriana San Andrés (Buenos Aires, Argentina).

External links[edit]