Iliotibial band syndrome

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Iliotibial band syndrome
Other namesIliotibial band friction syndrome (ITBFS)[1]
Iliotibial Band Syndrome.jpg
SpecialtySports medicine, orthopedics

Iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS) is a common injury to the knee, generally associated with running, cycling, hiking or weight-lifting (especially squats)[2].[citation needed]

Signs and symptoms[edit]

ITBS symptoms range from a stinging sensation just above the knee and outside of the knee (lateral side of the knee) joint, to swelling or thickening of the tissue in the area where the band moves over the femur. The stinging sensation just above the knee joint is felt on the outside of the knee or along the entire length of the iliotibial band. Pain may not occur immediately during activity, but may intensify over time. Pain is most commonly felt when the foot strikes the ground, and pain might persist after activity. Pain may also be present above and below the knee, where the ITB attaches to the tibia.

Causes[edit]

ITBS can result from one or more of the following: training habits, anatomical abnormalities, or muscular imbalances:

Anatomical mechanism[edit]

Iliotibial band syndrome is one of the leading causes of lateral knee pain in runners. The iliotibial band is a thick band of fascia on the lateral aspect of the knee, extending from the outside of the pelvis, over the hip and knee, and inserting just below the knee. The band is crucial to stabilizing the knee during running, as it moves from behind the femur to the front of the femur during activity. The continual rubbing of the band over the lateral femoral epicondyle, combined with the repeated flexion and extension of the knee during running may cause the area to become inflamed.

Diagnosis[edit]

Diagnosis of iliotibial band syndrome is based on history and physical exam findings, including tenderness at the lateral femoral epicondyle, where the iliotibial band passes over the bone.

Treatment[edit]

While ITBS pain can be acute, the iliotibial band can be rested, iced, compressed and elevated (RICE) to reduce pain and inflammation, followed by stretching.[2] Physical therapy can offer relief if symptoms arise.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ellis, R; Hing, W; Reid, D (August 2007). "Iliotibial band friction syndrome—A systematic review". Manual Therapy. 12 (3): 200–8. doi:10.1016/j.math.2006.08.004. PMID 17208506.
  2. ^ a b Barber, F. Alan; Sutker, Allan N. (August 1992). "Iliotibial Band Syndrome". Sports Medicine. 14 (2): 144–148. doi:10.2165/00007256-199214020-00005. PMID 1509227.
  3. ^ Farrell, Kevin C.; Reisinger, Kim D.; Tillman, Mark D. (March 2003). "Force and repetition in cycling: possible implications for iliotibial band friction syndrome". The Knee. 10 (1): 103–109. doi:10.1016/S0968-0160(02)00090-X.

Further reading[edit]

van der Worp, Maarten P.; van der Horst, Nick; de Wijer, Anton; Backx, Frank J. G.; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W. G. (23 December 2012). "Iliotibial Band Syndrome in Runners". Sports Medicine. 42 (11): 969–992. doi:10.1007/BF03262306.

External links[edit]

Classification
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