Iliya Iliev

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Iliya Iliev
Iliya iliev.jpg
Personal information
Full name Iliya Raychev Iliev
Date of birth (1974-12-20) 20 December 1974 (age 43)
Place of birth Sofia, Bulgaria
Height 1.76 m (5 ft 9 12 in)
Playing position Midfielder
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1993–2000 Septemvri Sofia 103 (26)
2000–2001 Litex Lovech 10 (0)
2002 Spartak Varna 22 (3)
2003 Terek Grozny 30 (3)
2004–2006 Marek Dupnitsa 66 (4)
2006–2008 Slavia Sofia 59 (7)
2008 Lokomotiv Mezdra 15 (8)
2009–2010 Sliven 2000 28 (1)
2010–2011 Slavia Sofia 33 (3)
2012–2014 Botev Vratsa 68 (15)
Total 434 (70)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 23 May 2014.

Iliya Iliev (Bulgarian: Илия Илиев; born 20 December 1974) is a former Bulgarian footballer, who played as a midfielder.[1]

Career[edit]

Iliev started his professional career with Septemvri Sofia after coming up through their youth academy. He played a major[citation needed] part in the clubs promotion to the A PFG in 1998, after a 37-year exile. In 1998–99 season he made his debut in the top flight, making 23 appearances during the campaign,[2] but Septemvri won just four games and were relegated.

He was sold to Litex Lovech in 2000 for €40,000,[3] winning the Bulgarian Cup a year later. Iliev played only 10 games in the league for Litex. Having failed to break into the first team, he signed for Spartak Varna in early 2002.

In 2003 Iliev joined Russian side Terek Grozny. He became a regular in the Terek first team, scoring three goals in 30 appearances in the Russian First Division. However, at the end of 2003 season in Russia, he returned to Bulgaria and signed for Marek Dupnitsa. In Marek Iliev spent two and a half seasons. He made 66 league appearances and scored 4 league goals.

On 19 July 2006, Iliev signed with Slavia Sofia.[4]

In June 2008, Iliev joined Lokomotiv Mezdra.[5] On 24 October, he scored a hat-trick in a 4–0 league win over Lokomotiv Sofia.[6] He spent a half-season at Lokomotiv, scoring 8 goals for 15 appearances. In December 2008, Iliev signed a three-year contract with Sliven 2000.[7]

In June 2010, his contract with Sliven was terminated and he re-signed for Slavia Sofia. Iliev made his second Slavia debut as a substitute in a 1–0 home loss against Kaliakra Kavarna on 31 July. On 13 March 2011, he scored Slavia's only goal in their 2–1 defeat at Beroe Stara Zagora. During 2010–11 season, Iliev earned 24 appearances in the A PFG. In the first half of the following campaign he scored 2 goals in 9 matches.

On 14 December 2011, Iliev signed with Botev Vratsa.[8] He made his debut on 3 March 2012 in a 1–0 home loss against his former club Slavia. He netted his first goal as he scored Botev's only goal in their 3–1 defeat at Chernomorets Burgas on 22 April. In August 2012, Iliev was announced as Botev's new captain.

Career statistics[edit]

Club Season League Cup Europe Other Total
Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Lokomotiv Mezdra 2008–09 15 8 1 0 16 8
Total 15 8 1 0 16 8
Sliven 2000 2008–09 13 0 0 0 13 0
2009–10 15 1 2 0 17 1
Total 28 1 2 0 30 1
Slavia Sofia 2010–11 24 1 2 0 26 1
2011–12 9 2 0 0 9 2
Total 33 3 2 0 35 3
Botev Vratsa 2011–12 15 3 0 0 15 3
2012–13 29 7 0 0 29 7
Total 44 10 0 0 44 10

Honours[edit]

Litex Lovech

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Iliya Iliev Facts". footballdatabase.eu. 
  2. ^ "И в А група има велики пътешественици" (in Bulgarian). temasport.com. Retrieved 20 January 2012. 
  3. ^ "Илия от махалата Татарли" (in Bulgarian). 7sport.net. Retrieved 27 October 2008. 
  4. ^ "Славия взе халф от Марек за Германия" (in Bulgarian). segabg.com. Retrieved 19 July 2006. 
  5. ^ "Локо Мездра взе 12 нови и замина за Благоевград" (in Bulgarian). sportni.bg. Retrieved 24 June 2008. 
  6. ^ "Локо (Мездра) громи Локо (София)" (in Bulgarian). topsport.bg. Retrieved 24 October 2008. 
  7. ^ "Сливен прилапа голмайстор №1" (in Bulgarian). standartnews.com. Retrieved 20 December 2008. 
  8. ^ "Халф смени Славия с Ботев Враца" (in Bulgarian). gong.bg. Retrieved 14 December 2011. 

External links[edit]