Imrei Binah

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Imrei Binah
Imrei Binah 2014-06-23 19-04.jpg
Imrei Binah, Kapust edition
Author Rabbi Dovber Schneuri, the second Chabad Rebbe
Published Kehot Publication Society
Pages 486 (Hardcover edition)[1]
ISBN 978-0826654991

Imrei Binah is a work by Rabbi Dovber Schneuri, the second Rebbe of the Chabad Hasidic movement. Imrei Binah is considered to be one of the most profound texts in Chabad philosophy.[2][3][4]

The central themes discussed in Imrei Binah are the Hasidic explanations for the commandment of the reading the Shema and donning the Tefillin.[5]

Background[edit]

Imrei Binah was originally written for the Chassid Yekusiel Liepler, a student of Rabbi Dovber.[6][4]

Teachings[edit]

  • "Oil alludes to and symbolizes the esoteric and hidden parts of the Torah."[7][8]

Study in Lubavitch[edit]

The Chassid Rabbi Yisroel Jacobson recalled that Imrei Binah was studied in the first Tomchei Tmimim yeshiva founded by the fifth Chabad Rebbe, Rabbi Sholom Dovber Schneersohn, in the town of Lubavitch. The mashpia, Rabbi Shilem Kuratin, convinced the older students at the yeshiva to study Imrei Binah, which they did for twelve hours a day. The younger students, Jacobson included, resisted Kuratin and chose to study the works of the fifth Rebbe instead.[9]

Publishing[edit]

Imrei Binah was initially published in Kapust and was later republished by Kehot Publication Society in Brooklyn, New York.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Book Page. Kehot Publication Society. Accessed April 7, 2014.
  2. ^ New Edition of Imrei Bina, Made Possible by a Gift from Mouli Cohen, Inspires Scholars of Chassidism and Mystics World Wide. Vocus. prweb.com. July 22, 2009. Accessed April 7, 2014.
  3. ^ Donor Prints New Imrei Bina. COLlive.com. July 22, 2009. Accessed April 7, 2014.
  4. ^ a b Dalfin, Chaim. The Seven Chabad-Lubavitch Rebbes. Jason Aronson. (1998): p. 32.
  5. ^ Schneuri, Dovber. Imrei Binah: Introduction Archived 2012-02-14 at the Wayback Machine.. ChabadLibrary.org. Accessed April 7, 2014.
  6. ^ Schneersohn, Shalom Doveber. Kuntres Umayan. Kehot Publication Society. Accessed April 7, 2014.
  7. ^ Schneuri, Dovber. Imrei Binah. Shaar HaKerias Shema, ch. 54.
  8. ^ Loebenstein, Yosef. Days of Destiny: The Jewish Year under a Chassidic Microscope. Sichos In English. Brooklyn: New York. Accessed July 12, 2014.
  9. ^ Jacobson, Yisroel. "Eating Snow: A Typical Night in Lubavitch." A Chassidishe Derher. (2012): p. 2. Accessed July 12, 2014.

External links[edit]