Inala, Queensland

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Inala
BrisbaneQueensland
Bremerinstitute.JPG
The Bremer Institute of TAFE, Inala
Population 13,769 (2011)[1]
Postcode(s) 4077
Location 18 km (11 mi) from Brisbane CBD
LGA(s) City of Brisbane
State electorate(s) Inala
Federal Division(s) Oxley
Suburbs around Inala:
Darra Oxley Durack
Richlands Inala Durack
Forest Lake Forest Lake Doolandella

Inala is a suburb of Brisbane, Australia, situated in the south-west of the metropolitan area. At the 2011 Australian Census the suburb recorded a population of 13,769.[1]

History[edit]

Following World War II there was a shortage of 250,000 houses across Australia. In Queensland alone over 4,000 families were living in makeshift dwellings of tin, calico and canvas. State and Commonwealth Governments responded by making housing a priority.

The history of Inala started as Serviceton suburb, the establishment of which was a meeting held in a Brisbane RSL Hall in May 1946. A group of ex-servicemen, led by Harold (Hock) Davis, were seeking affordable accommodation for their families during the post-war housing shortage. The Serviceton Co-operative Society was formed and they purchased 480 hectares of flood-safe land, which was then divided amongst the shareholders, giving them 800 square meters each. In 1949–1950 the Queensland Housing Commission purchased Serviceton, comprising approximately 850 acres (3.4 km²) of land, from the faltering Serviceton Housing Co-operative. The Housing Commission subsequently annexed another 200 acres (0.8 km²) to the suburb and changed its name to Inala in 1953 to avoid postal confusion with another Serviceton in South Australia.

Inala was planned as a satellite town set on a broad high, gently sloping ridge about 18 kilometres (11 mi) from the Brisbane General Post Office. The development of the housing designs for the estate coincided with the emergence of architectural modernism in Australia. The innovative designs of young southern architects such as Robin Boyd, Roy Grounds and Harry Seidler featured the efficient use of space with minimal ornamentation, utilisation of new materials and techniques, and above all design simplicity, while striving to build solid houses that would require little maintenance.

Architecture[edit]

The post-war worldwide shortage of building materials coupled with huge demands created the impetus for exploring and using new materials and techniques in Inala. Reinforced concrete was used in the construction of houses and this choice was made because of its strength, reliably and flexibility. Inala also had an advantage of good access to the local cement and concrete, made from washed river sand, and lime that came from coral dredged from Moreton Bay, shipped up the river by barge and crushed at Darra. Concrete was an ideal material for the fashionable modernist style. Inala houses were situated on raised concrete foundations, framed with hardwood timber and floored with hard-wearing brushbox. Windows were framed with silky oak. The outer walls were constructed of poured concrete approximately 18 cm thick. Internal walls and ceilings were constructed with rendered wire lath. These robust construction techniques also served to minimise maintenance costs and achieve a long life span of the houses.

Geography[edit]

Located 18 kilometres to the south west of the Brisbane CBD, Inala is considered a gateway to the nearby Wacol and Heathwood industrial estates. Inala Avenue/Poinsettia Street is the main roadway east-west and Serviceston Avenue/Rosemary Street and Blunder Road are the main roads stretching north-south.

Newer estates such as Forest Lake, and industrial estate, Heathwood, can be found to the south; other surrounding suburbs include, Durack, Darra and Oxley to the north; Richlands, Ellen Grove and Wacol to the west; and Willawong, Acacia Ridge, Pallara and Doolandella to the East.

Demographics[edit]

In the 2011 Census the population of Inala was 13,796, 51.3% female and 48.7% male. The median/average age of the Inala population is 33 years of age, 4 years below the Australian average.

52.8% of people living in Inala were born in Australia. The other top responses for country of birth were 15.9% Vietnam, 4.2% New Zealand, 3.5% United Kingdom, 0.8% Philippines, 0.5% Fiji, 0.4% Indonesia, 0.4% Germany, 0.3% India, 0.3% Netherlands.

50.9% of people speak English as their first language. The other top languages spoken are 24.5% Vietnamese, 4% Samoan, 1.3% Spanish, 1.3% Arabic, 1% Tongan, 0.5% Hindi, 0.5% Tagalog.

Suburb amenities, facilities and services[edit]

There are several shopping precincts within Inala. Inala Plaza — the “Civic Centre”, which is located on the corner of Kittyhawk and Inala Avenues, is the largest precinct in Inala and serves the ethnically diverse community by offering two major supermarkets, a large amount of various shops and many restaurants. Other shops and restaurants exist in Biota Street located to the north, Skylark Street shops located to the east, and Lavender/Lilac Strees. Richlands Plaza shopping and business centre opened on the border of Inala and Richlands in 2010, and offers a large supermarket, a few adjacent shops and services, cafes and a gym.

Inala has three post offices, numerous medical centres and services, many of which are bulk bill, a library, two community halls, a community art gallery, various churches and a Buddhist temple and monastery.

There are a large number of Government funded community organisations and programs located in Inala, some of these include Inala Youth Service, Inala Community House, Skylarkers, Western Districts Out of Home Care, Western Districts Family Steps, Shared Family Care and The Childcare Access and Equity Resource Support Unit.

Various government services are located within the Inala Plaza precinct and surrounds. These include a Brisbane City Council Library, Department of Communities, Department of Corrective Services and a Centrelink office.

Sport and recreation facilities include a Police Citizens Youth Club gym and fitness centre, a number of Brisbane City Council parks and recreation areas, sport ovals and facilities, and one of the best skate parks in Brisbane. Special pedestrian walkways between residential houses facilitate residents′ access to bus stops, schools, shops and recreational areas.

Inala has a very high percentage of green areas and parks with predominantly native Australian vegetation. The parks and the large amounts of grown native trees through the suburb maintain the natural beauty of Inala, quiet environment and clean air.[2]

Education[edit]

Inala has a number of schools and educational institutions. Schools include Richlands East Primary School, Serviceton South Primary School, St Marks Primary School. Inala also has a campus of the Bremer TAFE. Other Schools nearby include Inala Primary School, Durack State School, Glenala High School and Western Suburbs Special School.

Inala West State School opened on 2 January 1960 and closed on 31 December 2009. Richlands State School opened on 12 June 1934 and closed on 31 December 2010.[3]

Transport[edit]

Bus station at Inala Plaza

Buses conduct services from Inala Plaza bus station to railway stations nearest to Inala. Richlands railway station opened in 2011 is Inala's closest rail link, being approximately 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) from central Inala. The suburb also has bus connections to Darra, Oxley and Salisbury railway station, and the Brisbane CBD via the frequent express bus route 100 that operates from early morning till late night.

Inala has very good access to Ipswich Motorway, Centenary Motorway and Logan Motorway.

Political representation[edit]

Milton Dick is the Brisbane City Councillor for the area. The state representative is Annastacia Palaszczuk MP, State Member for Inala and Premier of Queensland since 2015, and at the federal level representative is Bernie Ripoll.

Culture and ethnicity[edit]

Inala is a vibrant multicultural society boasting more than 20 different nationalities. Big celebrations such as Multicultural Fiesta and Lunar New Year (Tết) are held regularly.

In 2011 Census, 25% of Inala residents stated no religious affiliation. The major religious affiliations are Catholic (24%), Buddhism (14%), Anglican (10%) and other Christian.

Inala has its own not-for-profit community group — “Richlands, Inala and Suburbs History Group” — dedicated to the research of local history and diverse cultural heritage, historical presentations and book publications on the topics of local history, community and culture.

Churches and religious buildings[edit]

  • Assemblies of God (Australian Christian Churches)
  • The Salvation Army
  • Inala Church of the Nazarene
  • St Mark's Catholic Church
  • Anglican Church
  • Uniting Church
  • Gospel Hall
  • The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS)
  • The Seventh Day Adventists
  • Inala Samoan Methodist Church
  • Citipointe West Church
  • Guru Nanak Sikh Temple - Gurdwara (Inala)
  • Phap Quang Buddhist Temple
  • Phat Da Buddhist Temple

Sporting clubs[edit]

  • Blue Fin Fishing Club
  • Brisbane Lions Soccer Club
  • West Inala Panthers Rugby League Football Club
  • West Inala Panthers Junior Rugby League Football Club

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Australian Bureau of Statistics (31 October 2012). "Inala (State Suburb)". 2011 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 11 January 2014. 
  2. ^ Community Renewal Progress Report January 2002 – June 2003
  3. ^ "Opening and closing dates of Queensland Schools". Queensland Government. Retrieved 12 February 2015. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 27°35′08″S 152°58′31″E / 27.5856°S 152.9754°E / -27.5856; 152.9754