Incest in popular culture

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Incest is a popular topic in English erotic fiction; there are entire collections and websites devoted solely to incest, and there exists an entire genre of pornographic pulp fiction known as "incest novels". Incest is sometimes mentioned or described in mainstream, non-erotic fiction. Connotations can be negative, positive, or neutral.

Mediums[edit]

Sculpture[edit]

Beatrice Cenci by Hosmer
  • The National Academy Museum presented a sculptural series by Tess O'Dwyer on the subject of incest entitled "Remnants of Violence"; the work suspended dozens of tricycle seats with bronze figures of sexually molested children and their headless abusers as a site specific work in the museum's rotunda in May 2014.[2][3]

Music[edit]

  • In the "Weird Al" Yankovic song, "A Complicated Song", a parody of the Avril Lavigne song, "Complicated", one of the verses is about the main character noticing how his fiance has her family crest tattooed on her, which looks exactly like the one on him.
  • In the James McMurtry song, "Choctaw Bingo", one of the last verses describes the narrator's 2nd cousins, Ruth-Anne and Lynn. Ruth-Anne and Lynn wear "cut-off britches and skinny little halters". The narrator describes that he has a sexual attraction to them, because of the clothes they wear.

[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The "Ghosting" of Incest and Female Relations in Harriet Hosmer's Beatrice Cenci". The Art Bulletin. 88 (2): 292–309. June 2006. 
  2. ^ "Creative Mischief Pop Up Exhibition". New York Daily News. 15 May 2014. p. 15. Retrieved 15 May 2014. In the museum's 19th century rotunda there hangs a haunting site specific installation in bronze and steel by Tess O'Dwyer on the sexual abuse of children, entitled "Remnants of Violence". 
  3. ^ Pellegrin, Maurizio (May 2014), Creative Mischief: A Pop Up Exhibition at the National Academy, National Academy Museum, retrieved May 2014  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  4. ^ Gonzalez, Erika (2003-08-15). "A Man of His 'Weird' Sultan of Spoof Al Yankovic Pillories Pop with 'Poodle Hat'. (Entertainment/Weekend/Spotlight)". Rocky Mountain News. Retrieved 2016-07-19 – via Highbeam Research. (subscription required (help)).