Inclusion rider

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An inclusion rider or equity rider is a provision in a actor's or filmmaker's contract that provides for a certain level of diversity in casting and production staff. For example, the rider might require a certain proportion of actors or staff to be women, people of color, LGBT people or people with disabilities.[1] Prominent actors or filmmakers may use their negotiating power to insist on such provisions. The term is derived from the "rider", a provision in the contract of performing actors to ensure certain aspects of a performance such as personal amenities or technical infrastructure.

History[edit]

The idea was developed by Stacy L. Smith, professor at the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism,[2] in a 2014 op-ed for The Hollywood Reporter[3] and in her 2016 TED talk.[4] Together with the film executive Fanshen Cox DiGiovanni[5] and the employment attorney Kalpana Kotagal[6][7][8] Smith created a template for an inclusion rider.[9]

Inclusion riders became more widely known when at the 2018 Academy Awards actress Frances McDormand said at the end of her acceptance speech, "I have two words to leave with you tonight, ladies and gentlemen: inclusion rider!"[10][11] McDormand had learned about inclusion riders only the week before the awards ceremony.[12]

Use[edit]

The following persons or institutions have committed to using inclusion riders or inclusion policies:

Filmmakers
Talent agencies
Entertainment companies

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Belam, Martin; Levin, Sam (5 March 2018). "Woman behind 'inclusion rider' explains Frances McDormand's Oscar speech". The Guardian. Retrieved 2018-03-05.
  2. ^ "Stacy Smith | USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism". annenberg.usc.edu. Retrieved 2018-03-05.
  3. ^ Stacy L. Smith (15 December 2014). "Hey, Hollywood: It's Time to Adopt the NFL's Rooney Rule–for Women". The Hollywood Reporter.
  4. ^ Smith, Stacy, The data behind Hollywood's sexism, retrieved 2018-03-21
  5. ^ Haring, Bruce (13 March 2018). "Matt Damon And Ben Affleck To Add Inclusion Riders on Pearl Street Projects". Deadline. Retrieved 2018-03-21.
  6. ^ Reisman, Sam (5 March 2018). "Oscars Shine Spotlight on Atty's Work On 'Inclusion Rider'". Law360.
  7. ^ Schneier, Cogan (6 March 2018). "Meet the Cohen Milstein Lawyer Behind The #InclusionRider". National Law Journal.
  8. ^ Keegan, Rebecca. "What's an Inclusion Rider? Let the Professor Who Helped Invent the Concept Explain". HWD. Retrieved 2018-03-05.
  9. ^ "Annenberg Inclusion Initiative | USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism". annenberg.usc.edu. Retrieved 2018-03-21.
  10. ^ Judkis, Maura; Merry, Stephanie (5 March 2018). "What is an inclusion rider? Explaining Frances McDormand's call to action at the Oscars". Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 2018-03-05.
  11. ^ Dobuzinskis, Alex; Allen, Jonathan (5 March 2018). "Oscar-winner McDormand wants an 'inclusion rider' What's that?". Reuters.
  12. ^ Abrahamson, Rachel Paula (5 March 2018). "Frances McDormand Explains the Meaning of 'Inclusion Rider' After Her Oscars Win". Us Magazine. Retrieved 12 March 2018.
  13. ^ a b McNary, Dave (12 March 2018). "Matt Damon, Ben Affleck Will Support Inclusion Rider in Future Deals". Variety. Retrieved 12 March 2018.
  14. ^ McNary, Dave (13 March 2018). "Paul Feig Adds Inclusion Rider in Feigco Entertainment Productions". Variety. Retrieved 13 March 2018.
  15. ^ "Michael B. Jordan on Instagram: "In support of the women & men who are leading this fight, I will be adopting the Inclusion Rider for all projects produced by my company…"". Instagram. Retrieved 2018-03-21.
  16. ^ Belam, Martin; Levin, Sam (5 March 2018). "Woman behind 'inclusion rider' explains Frances McDormand's Oscar speech". the Guardian. Retrieved 2018-03-21.
  17. ^ "Ari Emanuel: "It is Imperative" That WME Supports Inclusion Rider (Exclusive)". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved 2018-03-21.
  18. ^ "Warner Bros. 'inclusion rider' could bring more diversity to video games". Polygon. 8 September 2018. Retrieved 9 September 2018.