Inclusive Design Research Centre

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Inclusive Design Research Centre
Parent institution OCAD University
Founder(s) Jutta Treviranus[1]
Established September 1994 (?) (September 1994 (?))[1][2][3][4][5]
Focus Inclusive design in an information and communications technology context
Director Jutta Treviranus
Staff 20[6]
Formerly called Adaptive Technology Resource Centre[5][7][8]
Location Toronto, Canada
Address 205 Richmond Street West, Level 2
Website idrc.ocadu.ca

The Inclusive Design Research Centre (IDRC) is a research and development centre at OCAD University in Toronto, Canada. The centre defines inclusive design as that which "considers the full range of human diversity with respect to ability, language, culture, gender, age and other forms of human difference."[9] The research centre is directed by Jutta Treviranus.[10] In 2011 the centre launched a Master of Design in Inclusive Design.[11][12]

Current Projects[edit]

The IDRC supports open standards, open access, and open source technology wherever possible in order to maximize distribution and to encourage broad participation. Some of the new initiatives the IDRC is working on are:

FLOE Project: Flexible Learning for Open Education. FLOE is intended to enable inclusive access to personally relevant, engaging learning opportunities for the full diversity of learners and content producers. For example, Users can customize the look and feel and presentation of web content to meet their unique needs and preferences through FLOE User Interface Options. In addition, the FLOE video player allows multiple language caption support, synchronized and navigable transcripts, and is fully accessible via keyboard control, and screen reader.[13][14]

ADOD Project: Accessible Digital Office Document. ADOD is developing vendor-neutral manual with practical application-specific instructions that can help users choose accessible office applications and create accessible documents from common office application suites. The guidance is based primarily on WCAG 2.0 and ATAG 1.0 recommendations of the W3C. ADOD is being developed in partnership with UNESCO and the Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services.[14][15]

AEGIS Ontario: Integrating Accessibility into Emerging ICT. The ÆGIS Ontario project is devoted to ensuring that emerging information and communication technologies (ICT) are designed inclusively, thereby supporting Ontario's commitment to equal access and preparing Ontario's ICT businesses to meet the growing global demand for products and services that provide accessibility to people of all abilities. The project is funded by the Ontario Research Fund Research Excellence program, and is working in close partnership with AEGIS Europe.[14][16]

Inclusive Design Institute[edit]

The Inclusive Design Institute (IDI) is a related enterprise, housed in the same facilities as the IDRC, that serves as a regional research network for inclusive design. Also directed by Treviranus,[17] It was founded in 2008[18] and officially launched on 24 May 2012,[19] with the aim to “address the challenge of designing our information and communication systems (ICT) so that they work for all potential users, including users with disabilities, varying language needs and diverse cultural preferences.”[17] It consists of eight core postsecondary partners (OCAD University, University of Toronto, Ryerson University, York University, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Sheridan College, George Brown College and Seneca College) and over 100 collaborating organizations,[17] and is funded by the Canada Foundation for Innovation and the Ontario Ministry of Research and Innovation.[20][21][22] Thirty-five academics from the participating institutions are affiliated with the institute.[23]

Definition of Inclusive Design[edit]

Some research centres that use the term "inclusive design" do so synonymously with the older field of universal design. Both inclusive design and universal design seek to design systems "... so that work for people with disabilities results in systems that work better for everyone [and] increase the human capacity to meet legal, policy and societal commitments to accessibility, diversity and inclusion at a local, national and global level."[24][25] The IDRC, however, presents a definition of inclusive Design that has key differences from universal design and its own distinctive features. Inclusive design principles are intended to make universal design more fully inclusive, according to the centre.[24]

Universal design grew out of industrial and architectural design whereas inclusive design came out of the digital world. Greater design options allow inclusive design to produce one-size-fits-one solutions in contrast to universal design that features one-size-fits-all and may exclude outliers such as the multifaceted people with various disabilities.[24][26] Notes the IDRC: "while universal design is about creating a common design that works for everyone, we [in inclusive design] have the freedom to create a design system that can adapt, morph, or stretch to address each design need presented by each individual." [24] Researchers in inclusive design believe that every user of any system, be it digital or policy, must be recognized as unique and that "it is the responsibility of inclusive designers to be aware of the context and broader impact of any design and strive to effect a beneficial impact beyond the intended beneficiary of the design."[24]

Treviranus, the IDRC head, has led a body of research investigating and developing a new approach to accessibility: reframing disability as a mismatch between the needs of the user and the environment or system offered (and therefore not a personal trait but a consequence of the relationship between the individual and their environment).[27] This technical and conceptual framework takes advantage of the plasticity of information and communications technology (ICT) systems to personally optimize the user interface to the needs and preferences of each individual.[27] This approach supports human diversity in digital systems not by attempting to find a one-size-fits-all solution but by adapting to the cluster of diverse needs of each user.[28]

Jutta Treviranus[edit]

Director of both the IDRC and IDI, Jutta Treviranus is a world expert in the field of inclusive design who has made appearances at the White House and United Nations.[29] She has "led many international multi‐partner research networks that have created broadly implemented technical innovations that support inclusion." Her work has included designing open source content and helping implement accessibility legislation, standards, and specifications.[30]

In 2013 Treviranus was awarded the Queen's Diamond Jubilee Medal.[31] In the same year, the International Electrotechnical Commission awarded Treviranus their International 1906 Award; it recognizes experts' contributions to the field.[32][33]

Awards and distinctions[edit]

  • 2011 Platinum Learning Impact Leadership Award, IMS Global Learning Consortium for A-Tutor
  • 2009 Delegates Web Accessibility Challenge Award, WWW/W4A Conference, Madrid for A-Tutor & AccessForAll.
  • 2008 Gold Learning Impact Award, IMS Global Learning Consortium for A-Tutor
  • 2008 Learning Impact Leadership Award, IMS Global Learning Consortium for Fluid Project
  • 2008 Learning Impact Leadership Award, IMS Global Learning Consortium for Transformable

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Kochany, Kaitlyn (September 25, 2013). "I Want Your Job: Jutta Treviranus, Director of the Inclusive Design Research Centre". Torontoist. Retrieved June 3, 2014. After starting the Adaptive Technology Resource Centre at the University of Toronto in 1994, Treviranus moved it to OCADU in 2010 and rebranded it as the IDRC. 
  2. ^ "The Adaptive Technology Resource Centre" (PDF). Augmentative Communications News. 8 (2): 7. March–April 1995. Retrieved July 28, 2013. The Adaptive Technology Resource Centre (ATRC), located at the University of Toronto, opened in September, 1994 
  3. ^ Canadian National Institute for the Blind (June 15, 2005). "2005 Recipient: University of Toronto, Adaptive Technology Resource Centre (ATRC)". Archived from the original on June 6, 2014. Retrieved June 3, 2014. The ATRC was established in 1994 
  4. ^ "Jutta TREVIRANUS". European Commission: ICT 2013. Retrieved June 3, 2014. With its origins in the Adaptive Technology Resource Centre established in 1993, the IDRC is…. 
  5. ^ a b "Staff Pages: Jutta Treviranus (Director)". Inclusive Design Research Centre, OCAD University. Retrieved June 3, 2014. With the help of a many individuals and organizations I established the then "Adaptive Technology Resource Centre" (ATRC) in 1993 at the University of Toronto.…Thanks to talented staff, many of whom are students, the ATRC, now the Inclusive Design Research Centre at OCAD University, continues to meet these expectations. 
  6. ^ "Staff pages". Inclusive Design Research Centre, OCAD University. Retrieved June 3, 2014. 
  7. ^ "What is a Learning Management System?". University of Toronto. Retrieved June 3, 2014. ATutor was developed by U of T's Adaptive Technology Resource Centre, which was renamed the Inclusive Design Research Centre and relocated to OCAD University August 1, 2010. 
  8. ^ Raising the Floor. "Jutta Treviranus". Archived from the original on June 7, 2014. Retrieved June 3, 2014. Jutta Treviranus is the Director of the Inclusive Design Research Centre (IDRC) and professor at OCAD University in Toronto, formerly the Adaptive Technology Resource Centre. 
  9. ^ "About the IDRC". Inclusive Design Research Centre (OCAD University). Retrieved 30 January 2014. 
  10. ^ "Staff Pages". Inclusive Design Research Centre (OCAD University). Retrieved 30 January 2014. 
  11. ^ Law, Jaclyn (March 30, 2011). "OCAD U Sees an Accessible Future with New Master Program in Inclusive Design". Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA). aoda.ca. 
  12. ^ "Master's Program". Inclusive Design Research Centre (OCAD University). Archived from the original on 2 February 2014. Retrieved 30 January 2014. 
  13. ^ "Flexible Learning for Open Education". Inclusive Design Research Centre. Retrieved April 23, 2014. 
  14. ^ a b c "New Projects". Inclusive Design Research Centre (OCAD University). Retrieved 23 April 2014. 
  15. ^ "Accessible Digital Office Document (ADOD) Project". Inclusive Design Research Centre. Retrieved 23 April 2014. 
  16. ^ "ÆGIS Project (Ontario)". Inclusive Design Research Centre. Retrieved 23 April 2014. 
  17. ^ a b c "Inclusive Design Institute – About – Overview". Inclusive Design Institute. Retrieved 5 November 2012. 
  18. ^ Treviranus, Jutta. "New Directions". Inclusive Design Research Centre. Retrieved 4 November 2012. 
  19. ^ "OCAD University opens Inclusive Design Institute". Council of Ontario Universities. Archived from the original on 1 February 2014. Retrieved 5 November 2012. 
  20. ^ "OCAD University welcomes the Inclusive Design Research Centre and the Inclusive Design Institute". Council of Ontario Universities. Archived from the original on 1 February 2014. Retrieved 5 November 2012. 
  21. ^ "List of Funded Projects". Canada Foundation for Innovation. Archived from the original on 3 February 2014. Retrieved 5 November 2012. 
  22. ^ "Ontario Research Fund Infrastructure Program" (PDF). Ontario Ministry of Research and Innovation. p. 10. Archived from the original (PDF) on 31 August 2012. Retrieved 5 November 2012. 
  23. ^ "Who We Are". Inclusive Design Institute. Retrieved 30 January 2014. 
  24. ^ a b c d e "IDRC Definition of Inclusive Design". Retrieved April 14, 2014. 
  25. ^ "Master of Design Programs". Archived from the original on February 22, 2014. Retrieved April 14, 2014. 
  26. ^ "What is inclusive design?". Retrieved August 30, 2017. 
  27. ^ a b "IMS AccessForAll Meta-data Information Model". IMS Global Learning Consortium, Inc. Retrieved May 30, 2014. 
  28. ^ "IMS Learner Information Package Accessibility for LIP Information Model". IMS Global Learning Consortium, Inc. Retrieved May 30, 2014. [permanent dead link]
  29. ^ Kochany, Kaitlyn. "I Want Your Job: Jutta Treviranus, Director of the Inclusive Design Research Centre". Torontoist. Retrieved 30 January 2014. 
  30. ^ "Jutta Treviranus: Background for ECM" (PDF). United Nations. Retrieved 30 January 2014. 
  31. ^ "The Diamond Jubilee Medal". Governor General of Canada. 2013. Retrieved February 3, 2014. 
  32. ^ "Professor Jutta Treviranus winner of International Electrotechnical Commission 1906 Award". Standards Council of Canada. Retrieved 30 January 2014. 
  33. ^ "1906 Award: Criteria". International Electrotechnical Commission. Retrieved 30 January 2014.