Indefatigable (1799)

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History
Name: Indefatigable
Owner: Atty & Co.[1]
Builder: Ing. Eskdale[2]
Launched: 1799, Whitby
Fate: Burnt to the waterline in 1815
General characteristics [2]
Tons burthen: 549 (bm)
Length: 127 ft (39 m)
Beam: 31 ft 8 in (10 m)
Propulsion: Sail
Armament:
  • 1800: 10 × 6-pounder guns[3]
  • 1804: No longer armed
  • 1812: 10 guns
Notes: Hull sheathed in copper

Indefatigable was a square-rigged, three-decked, three-masted merchant ship launched in 1799 at Whitby for James Atty & Co. for the West Indies trade. She twice transported convicts to Australia; on the first trip she was chartered to the British East India Company (EIC). She burned to the waterline in 1815.

Career[edit]

Indefatigable spent her 11 years as a transport, first sailing out of London and then out of Cork. She was armed for the first few years but then her owners apparently removed her guns.

Year Master Owner Trade Notes
1800 J. Brown Atty & Co. London transport 10 × 6-pounder guns
1801 J. Brown Atty & Co. London transport 10 × 6-pounder guns
1802 J. Brown Atty & Co. London transport 10 × 6-pounder guns
1803 J. Brown Atty & Co. London transport 10 × 6-pounder guns
1804 J. Brown Atty & Co. London transport
1805 J. Brown Atty & Co. Cork transport
1806 J. Brown Atty & Co. Cork transport
1807 J. Brown Atty & Co. Cork transport
1808 J. Brown Atty & Co. Cork transport
1809 J. Brown Atty & Co. Cork transport
1810 J. Brown Atty & Co. Cork transport
1811 J. Brown
J. Cross
Atty & Co. Cork transport 10 guns
1812 J. Cross Atty & Co. London transport
In river
10 guns
1812 J. Cross Atty & Co. London-New South Wales 10 guns

Convict transport[edit]

Indefatigable was under charter to the EIC and under the command of John Cross, when she left England on 4 June 1812, passing the Lizard on 7 June.[4] She sailed together with Minstrel and they reached Rio de Janeiro on 29 July. There they joined the Archduke Charles, which was transporting convicts from Ireland, also for Port Jackson. The three vessels left Rio together on 11 August, but Archduke Charles parted the next day. Six days after they left Rio, a gale separated Minstrel and Indefatigable.

She arrived at Hobart Town on 19 October.[4] Indefatigable had left with 200 convicts and she landed 199, one having died on the way.[5]

Indefatigable left Hobart Town and arrived at Port Jackson on 6 December. She left Port Jackson on 7 January 1813 bound for England.[6] She arrived at the Cape on 6 August,[4] Indefatigable had been at Canton, where she had loaded a modest cargo of tea and no textiles.[7] From the Cape she sailed to St Helena, where she arrived on 5 September. She apparently did not leave St Helena until 1 March 1814, but then reached Blackwall on 19 May.[4]

On her second convict voyage, under the command of Matthew Bowles, Indefatigable left England in 1814. She sailed via Rio de Janeiro and arrived at Port Jackson on 26 April.[8] She transported 200 male convicts, two of whom died on the voyage.[5] Indefatigable left Port Jackson on 13 July bound for Bengal.[6]

Fate[edit]

While anchored at Batavia (now Jakarta), Indefatigable was burnt to the waterline in an accident on 23 October 1815 and declared a total loss.[9] Her cargo was also lost.[10]

Citations and references[edit]

Citations

  1. ^ Hackman (2001), p.235.
  2. ^ a b Weatherill (1908), p.100.
  3. ^ Lloyd's Register (1800)
  4. ^ a b c d British Library: Indefatigable.
  5. ^ a b Bateson (1974), p. 327.
  6. ^ a b "Arrival of Vessels at Port Jackson, and their Departure". Australian Town and Country Journal, Saturday 3 January 1891, p.16. Retrieved 18 June 2012. 
  7. ^ Archives year book for South African History (1961), p.271.
  8. ^ Bateson (1974), pp.290-1.
  9. ^ Bateson, p.54.
  10. ^ Lloyd's List №5050.

References

  • Bateson, Charles, The Convict Ships, 1787–1868, Sydney, 1974. ISBN 0-85174-195-9
  • Hackman, Rowan (2001) Ships of the East India Company. (Gravesend, Kent: World Ship Society). ISBN 0-905617-96-7
  • Weatherill, Richard (1908) The ancient port of Whitby, and its ships. (Whitby: Horne & Son.)