Independence Institute

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Not to be confused with The Independent Institute, a libertarian think-tank based in Oakland, California.
Independence Institute
Logo Independence Institute.jpg
Freedom's Front Line
Established 1985[1]
Chairman Catherine Shopneck[2]
President Jon Caldara[3]
Budget Revenue: $2,570,000
Expenses: $2,255,566
(FYE June 2013)[4]
Location Denver, Colorado
Coordinates 39°44′31″N 104°58′40″W / 39.7419°N 104.9779°W / 39.7419; -104.9779Coordinates: 39°44′31″N 104°58′40″W / 39.7419°N 104.9779°W / 39.7419; -104.9779
Address

727 E. 16th Ave.

Denver, Colorado 80203
Website www.i2i.org

The Independence Institute (II) is a libertarian think tank based in Denver, Colorado.[2] The group's stated mission "is to empower individuals and to educate citizens, legislators and opinion makers about public policies that enhance personal and economic freedom."[5]

History[edit]

The Independence Institute was founded in 1985 by John Andrews, a former Republican state legislator from Colorado.[1][6] The organization's current president is Jon Caldara.[3]

Policy positions[edit]

The Independence Institute is a proponent of educational choice and charter schools. II supported school board candidates in Douglas County, Colorado who won the majority there in 2013 and subsequently ceased recognizing the district’s union, abolished established teacher tenure, and expanded charter schools.[7]

Prior to winning election to the United States House of Representatives as a Democrat, Jared Polis wrote a white paper for the institute about privatizing the U.S. Postal Service.[6]

II supports gun rights, including the right of concealed carry.[6][8][9]

In 2013, II opposed Amendment 66, an unsuccessful ballot measure which would have increased the state's income tax by $950 million.[10] The organization supported the Taxpayer Bill of Rights (TABOR), which was passed by Colorado voters in 1992.[11]

II opposed the Affordable Care Act.[12][13]

See also[edit]

  • State Policy Network – a U.S. national network of conservative and libertarian think tanks of which the Independence Institute is a member

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Jon Caldara to speak at annual Republican Lincoln Day event". Vail Daily News. February 3, 2014. Retrieved 6 March 2015. 
  2. ^ a b Jones, Brad (2009-11-27). "Right wing takes flight at Independence Institute's Founders' Night Dinner". Colorado Statesman. Retrieved 14 June 2013. 
  3. ^ a b "Jon Caldara's political stunt had a purpose". Denver Post. September 9, 2013. Retrieved 6 March 2015. 
  4. ^ "Charity Rating". Charity Navigator.  Also see "Quickview data" (PDF). GuideStar. 
  5. ^ "About the Independence Institute". Independence Institute. Retrieved 6 March 2015. 
  6. ^ a b c Bunch, Joey (August 11, 2013). "Colorado's free-market Independence Institute finding its place". Denver Post. Retrieved 6 March 2015. 
  7. ^ Tomasic, John (September 1, 2014). "Who’s afraid of Jon Caldara’s school board sunshine?". Colorado Independent. Retrieved 6 March 2015. 
  8. ^ Overbeck, Joy (February 28, 2013). "Colorado anti-gun laws target the most vulnerable". Washington Times. Retrieved 6 March 2015. 
  9. ^ Bartels, Lynn (March 7, 2014). "Independence Institute celebrates victories during spirited Founders’ Night". Denver Post. Retrieved 6 March 2015. 
  10. ^ Simpson, Kevin (November 5, 2013). "Voters reject big tax hike, school finance measure Amendment 66". Denver Post. Retrieved 6 March 2015. 
  11. ^ Hoover, Tim (December 23, 2012). "Two decades later, TABOR praised, blamed for limiting government". Denver Post. Retrieved 6 March 2015. 
  12. ^ Richardson, Valerie (November 21, 2012). "Stryker Corportation Confirms ObamaCare Layoffs". Colorado Observer. Retrieved 6 March 2015. 
  13. ^ Tomasic, John (March 26, 2012). "Independence Institute on Obamacare: It’s not about the Commerce Clause". Colorado Independent. Retrieved 6 March 2015. 

External links[edit]