Index of Soviet Union–related articles

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Union of Soviet Socialist Republics

Союз Советских Социалистических Республик
Soyuz Sovetskikh Sotsialisticheskikh Respublik
1922–1991
Flag of the Soviet Union
Flag
(1955–1991)
State emblem (1956–1991) of the Soviet Union
State emblem
(1956–1991)
Motto: 
"Пролетарии всех стран, соединяйтесь!"
Proletarii vsekh stran, soyedinyaytes'!
("Workers of the world, unite!")
Anthem: 
"Интернационал"
Internatsional
("The Internationale")
(1922–1944)

"Государственный гимн СССР"
Gosudarstvennyy gimn SSSR
("State Anthem of the USSR")
(1944–1991)[1]
The Soviet Union from 1945 to 1991
The Soviet Union from 1945 to 1991
Capital
and largest city
Moscow
55°45′N 37°37′E / 55.750°N 37.617°E / 55.750; 37.617
Official languagesRussian[a][2]
Recognised regional languages
Minority languages
Ethnic groups
(1989)
Religion
Secular state[1][2]
State atheism[b]
Demonym(s)Soviet
Government
Leader 
• 1922–1924
Vladimir Lenin
• 1924–1953
Joseph Stalin
• 1953[c]
Georgy Malenkov
• 1953–1964
Nikita Khrushchev
• 1964–1982
Leonid Brezhnev
• 1982–1984
Yuri Andropov
• 1984–1985
Konstantin Chernenko
• 1985–1991
Mikhail Gorbachev
Head of state 
• 1922–1946 (first)
Mikhail Kalinin
• 1988–1991 (last)
Mikhail Gorbachev
Head of government 
• 1922–1924 (first)
Vladimir Lenin
• 1991 (last)
Ivan Silayev
LegislatureCongress of Soviets
(1922–1936)[d]
Supreme Soviet
(1936–1991)
Soviet of Nationalities
Soviet of the Union
Historical era20th century
7 November 1917
30 December 1922
16 June 1923
31 January 1924
5 December 1936
22 June 1941
9 May 1945
25 February 1956
9 October 1977
11 March 1990
14 March 1990
19–22 August 1991
8 December 1991
26 December 1991[3]
Area
• Total
22,402,200 km2 (8,649,500 sq mi)
Population
• 1989 census
Increase 286,730,819[14] (3rd)
• Density
12.7/km2 (32.9/sq mi)
GDP (PPP)1990 estimate
• Total
$2.7 trillion[15] (2nd)
• Per capita
$9,000
GDP (nominal)1990 estimate
• Total
$2.7 trillion[15] (2nd)
• Per capita
$9,000 (28th)
Gini (1989)0.275
low
HDI (1990)0.920[16]
very high
CurrencySoviet ruble (руб) (SUR)
Time zone(UTC+2 to +12)
Date formatdd-mm-yyyy
Driving sideright
Calling code+7
ISO 3166 codeSU
Internet TLD.su[4]
Preceded by
Succeeded by
1922:
Russian
SFSR
Ukrainian SSR
Byelorussian SSR
Transcaucasian SFSR
1924:
Bukharan SSR
Khorezm SSR
1939:
Poland
1940:
Finland
Romania
Estonia
Latvia
Lithuania
1944:
Tuva
1945:
Germany
1946:
Czechoslovakia
1990:
Lithuania
Latvia
Estonia
Gagauzia
1991:
Georgia
Ukraine
Belarus
Artsakh
Transnistria
Moldova
Kyrgyzstan
Uzbekistan
Tajikistan
Armenia
Azerbaijan
Turkmenistan
South Ossetia
Chechnya
Russia
Kazakhstan
Notes
  1. ^ Declaration № 142-Н of the Soviet of the Republics of the Supreme Soviet of the Soviet Union, formally establishing the dissolution of the Soviet Union as a state and subject of international law (in Russian).
  2. ^ Original lyrics used from 1944 to 1956 praised Stalin. No lyrics from 1956 to 1977. Revised lyrics from 1977 to 1991 displayed.
  3. ^ All-union official since 1990, constituent republics had the right to declare their own official languages.
  4. ^ Assigned on 19 September 1990, existing onwards.

An index of articles related to the former nation known as the Soviet Union. It covers the Soviet revolutionary period until the dissolution of the Soviet Union. This list includes topics, events, persons and other items of national significance within the Soviet Union. It does not include places within the Soviet Union, unless the place is associated with an event of national significance (e.g., Moscow). This index also does not contain items related to Soviet Military History.

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H[edit]

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I[edit]

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J[edit]

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Lists[edit]

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M[edit]

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N[edit]

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O[edit]

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P[edit]

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R[edit]

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S[edit]

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T[edit]

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U[edit]

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V[edit]

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W[edit]

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Y[edit]

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Z[edit]

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See also[edit]

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Notes[edit]

  1. ^ De facto before 1990.
  2. ^ De facto.
  3. ^ March–September.
  4. ^ Unicameral

References[edit]

  1. ^ "ARTICLE 124". Archived from the original on 2 January 2019. Retrieved 4 February 2019.
  2. ^ "Article 52". Archived from the original on 16 February 2019. Retrieved 4 February 2019.
  3. ^ Jan Plamper, The Stalin Cult: A Study in the Alchemy of Power (2012).
  4. ^ Isaac Deutscher, Stalin: A Polityical Biography (2nd edition, 1961) chapters 7-9 online
  5. ^ T. B. Bottomore. A Dictionary of Marxist thought. (Wiley-Blackwell, 1991). p. 54.
  6. ^ Rutland, Peter (1993). The Politics of Economic Stagnation in the Soviet Union: The Role of Local Party Organs in Economic Management. Cambridge University Press. p. 9. ISBN 978-0-521-39241-9. [...] after 1953. [...] This was still an oppressive regime, but not a totalitarian one.
  7. ^ Krupnik, Igor (1995). "4. Soviet Cultural and Ethnic Policies Towards Jews: A Legacy Reassessed". In Ro'i, Yaacov (ed.). Jews and Jewish Life in Russia and the Soviet Union. Routledge. ISBN 978-0-714-64619-0. The era of 'social engineering' in the Soviet Union ended with the death of Stalin in 1953 or soon after; and that was the close of the totalitarian regime itself.
  8. ^ von Beyme, Klaus (2014). On Political Culture, Cultural Policy, Art and Politics. Springer. p. 65. ISBN 978-3-319-01559-0. The Soviet Union after the death of Stalin moved from totalitarianism to authoritarian rule.
  9. ^ Historical Dictionary of Socialism. James C. Docherty, Peter Lamb. Page 85. "The Soviet Union was a one-party Marxist-Leninist state".
  10. ^ "Ideology, Interests, and Identity". Archived 21 July 2013 at the Wayback Machine. Stephen H. Hanson. Page 14. "the USSR was officially a Marxist-Leninist state".
  11. ^ "The Fine Line between Enforcement of Human Rights Agreements and the Violation of National Sovereignty: The Case of Soviet Dissidents". Archived 8 August 2014 at the Wayback Machine. Jennifer Noe Pahre. p. 336. "[...] the Soviet Union, as a Marxist-Leninist state [...]". p. 348. "The Soviet Union is a Marxist–Leninist state".
  12. ^ Leninist National Policy: Solution to the "National Question"? Archived 8 August 2014 at the Wayback Machine. Walker Connor. Page 31. "[...] four Marxist-Leninist states (the Soviet Union, China, Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia)[...]".
  13. ^ "Law of the USSR of March 14, 1990 N 1360-I 'On the establishment of the office of the President of the USSR and the making of changes and additions to the Constitution (Basic Law) of the USSR'". Garant.ru. Archived from the original on 10 October 2017. Retrieved 12 July 2010.
  14. ^ Almanaque Mundial 1996, Editorial América/Televisa, Mexico, 1995, pages 548-552 (Demografía/Biometría table).
  15. ^ a b "GDP – Million – Flags, Maps, Economy, Geography, Climate, Natural Resources, Current Issues, International Agreements, Population, Social Statistics, Political System". Archived from the original on 12 June 2018. Retrieved 29 August 2018.
  16. ^ "Human Development Report 1990" (PDF). HDRO (Human Development Report Office) United Nations Development Programme. p. 111. Archived (PDF) from the original on 7 February 2019. Retrieved 1 September 2020.