Indigenous people in video gaming

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Indigenous people have a long history of collaborating on the creation of video games.[1] It has only been with the release of Never Alone though that broad media attention has been paid to these projects.[2] There have been a growing number of game gatherings and community organizing around Indigenous games happening in the United States and Canada.[3][4] Indigenous creators of video games have been featured in the DIGITAL MEDIA ART+CADE as part of imagineNATIVE[5] and in Memories of the Future/Souvenirs du futur at SAW Video Media Art Centre in Ottawa.[6] Many early video games that depicted Indigenous people were misrepresented and perpetuated negative post-colonial stereotypes (see Custer's Revenge).[7] Video games created by Indigenous people enable the creators to self-determine how they are represented[8] and enables Indigenous people to picture themselves in the future.[9]

Games where Indigenous people represent themselves[edit]

Indigenous people have been involved in a range of projects where they have the opportunity to depict themselves. These games range in the style of the collaboration from games that consult with a single Indigenous person to games that are entirely developed and designed by Indigenous people.[1]

Indigenous people working in the gaming industry[edit]

There are Indigenous people working on a range of large blockbusters to small indie collaborations. Many of these individuals are also creating other artistic content such as comics, board games, machinima, and fine art. Achimostawinan Games[1], a team which is composed of four Indigenous video game designers Meagen Bryen and Tara Miller. Dames Making Games event[2], a not-for-profit organization which provides accessible space for females in the video game industry. Purity & Decay was created during the event by Achimostawinan[27] team which is created by Indigenous centred-lens and representational in the narrative. Achimostawinan[3] is responsible for open access games such as, Night Vision (LightMaze),and Wanisinowin | Lost. Graphic designer, Elizabeth LaPensee[4], who is Anishinaabe and Metis and the founder of LaPensee gamer, project has a role in creating Honour Water and Invaders which bridges the gap of new media and cultural traditions

Games translated into Indigenous languages[edit]

There have also been numerous video games translated into Indigenous languages. For example, Pinnguaq has localized osmosis, Ittle Dew and Beneath the Floes.[33]

Academic studies[edit]

Academic studies of indigenous video gaming are still infrequent. In 2017, the peer-reviewed open-access Indigenous Studies journal Transmotion devoted a special issue to the topic.[34]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b https://vimeo.com/128110465
  2. ^ A Tribe Called Geek's third podcast called "Indigenous Gaming" http://atribecalledgeek.com/tag/video-games/ ; see also http://ca.ign.com/articles/2015/01/16/the-rise-of-indigenous-storytelling-in-games
  3. ^ a b https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/natives-game-dev-gathering-elizabeth-lapens%C3%A9e
  4. ^ a b c http://pinnguaq.com/blog-all/120-evening-celebrate
  5. ^ http://www.imaginenative.org/home/node/4546
  6. ^ http://www.sawvideo.com/event/memories-future
  7. ^ http://www.cbc.ca/news/aboriginal/indigenous-video-game-designer-takes-stand-against-custer-s-revenge-1.2851104
  8. ^ http://www.content.alternative.ac.nz/index.php/alternative/article/view/274
  9. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kDDOWF31WpI
  10. ^ http://www.7generationgames.com/2013/10/20/our-cultural-consultant-on-cultural-content-in-spirit-lake-the-game/
  11. ^ a b c http://www.elizabethlapensee.com/#/games/
  12. ^ http://pinnguaq.com/nunavut-code-club/
  13. ^ http://www.pathoftheelders.com/aboutus
  14. ^ https://www.facebook.com/skins.workshops/?fref=nf
  15. ^ http://www.sbs.com.au/nitv/nitv-news/article/2017/04/20/video-games-encourage-indigenous-cultural-expression
  16. ^ http://www.rezolutionpictures.com/new-cree-video-game-spirits-of-spring-featured-in-best-new-games-on-apple-store-in-over-130-countries/
  17. ^ https://itunes.apple.com/ca/developer/ogoki-learning-systems-inc./id477459819
  18. ^ http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/pangnirtung-nunavut-game-studio-brings-work-of-pudlo-pudlat-to-life-1.3121713
  19. ^ http://uctp.blogspot.ca/2012_11_01_archive.html
  20. ^ http://www.cbc.ca/news/aboriginal/music-mogul-designed-to-teach-indigenous-students-business-skills-1.2944805
  21. ^ http://www.cbc.ca/m/touch/aboriginal/story/1.2483001
  22. ^ http://www.abtec.org/blog/?p=381
  23. ^ https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/sep/29/never-alone-alaskas-indigenous-game-never-alone-teaches-cooperation-through-stories
  24. ^ http://www.neliufpe.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/13.pdf
  25. ^ http://ca.ign.com/articles/2015/01/16/the-rise-of-indigenous-storytelling-in-games
  26. ^ http://mashable.com/2016/03/07/indigenous-video-game-huni-kuin/#wH5z.5wtnOqU
  27. ^ https://gamejolt.com/@Achimostawinan/games"
  28. ^ http://www.ogokilearning.com/about-ogoki-learning-systems-learning-president-bio/
  29. ^ http://www.nationnews.ca/moving-in-a-new-direction/
  30. ^ https://tworowtimes.com/art-and-culture/first-nations-comics-and-video-games-draw-a-crowd/
  31. ^ a b http://www.usgamer.net/articles/more-than-shamans-and-savages-american-indians-and-game-development
  32. ^ http://www.maorifuturemakers.com/maru-nihoniho-games-developer
  33. ^ http://pinnguaq.com/localization/
  34. ^ Transmotion 3:1 (2017) https://journals.kent.ac.uk/index.php/transmotion/issue/view/25