Indolamines

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Tryptamine - otherwise known as indolamine.

Indolamines are a family of neurotransmitters that share a common molecular structure (namely, indolamine). Indolamines are a classification of monoamine neurotransmitter, along with catecholamines and ethylamine. A common example of an indolamine is the tryptophan derivative serotonin, a neurotransmitter involved in mood and sleep.[1] Another example of an indolamine is melatonin.

In biochemistry, indolamines are substituted indole compounds that contain an amino group. Examples of indoleamines include the lysergamides.

Synthesis[edit]

The pathway for the synthesis of serotonin from tryptophan. Note that all compounds shown are indolamines.

[citation needed] Indolamines are biologically synthesized from the essential amino acid tryptophan. Tryptophan is synthesized into serotonin through the addition of a hydroxyl group by the enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase and the subsequent removal of the carboxyl group by the enzyme 5-HTP decarboxylase.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Young, S. N. (2007). "How to increase serotonin in the human brain without drugs". Journal of Psychiatry & Neuroscience. 32 (6): 394–399. PMC 2077351. PMID 18043762.
  2. ^ Carlson, Neil R. Physiology of Behavior. 11th ed. Vol. 1. N.p.: Pearson Education, n.d. Print.