2019 Indonesian general election

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Indonesian presidential election, 2019

← 2014 17 April 2019 2024 →
  Joko Widodo 2014 official portrait.jpg Prabowo.jpg
Candidate Joko Widodo Prabowo Subianto
Party PDI-P Gerindra
Alliance
Running mate Ma'ruf Amin Sandiaga Uno

Incumbent President

Joko Widodo
PDI-P



Indonesian legislative election, 2019

← 2014 17 April 2019 2024 →

All 711 seats in the People's Consultative Assembly:
People's Representative Council: 575
Regional Representative Council: 136
288 DPR seats needed for a majority
  Megawati Sukarnoputri Airlangga Hartarto Prabowo Subianto
Leader Megawati Sukarnoputri Airlangga Hartarto Prabowo Subianto
Party PDI-P Golkar Gerindra
Last election 109 seats, 18.95% 91 seats, 14.75% 73 seats, 11.81%

  Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono Zulkifli Hasan Muhaimin Iskandar
Leader Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono Zulkifli Hasan Muhaimin Iskandar
Party Demokrat PAN PKB
Last election 61 seats, 10.19% 49 seats, 7.59% 47 seats, 9.04%

  Sohibul Iman Muhammad Romahurmuziy Surya Paloh
Leader Sohibul Iman Muhammad Romahurmuziy Surya Paloh
Party PKS PPP Nasdem
Last election 40 seats, 6.79% 39 seats, 6.53% 35 seats, 6.72%

Incumbent Speakers

MPR: Zulkifli Hasan
DPR: Bambang Soesatyo
DPD: Oesman Sapta Odang



National emblem of Indonesia Garuda Pancasila.svg
This article is part of a series on the
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General elections will be held in Indonesia on 17 April 2019. For the first time in Indonesian history, the president, the vice president, and members of the People's Consultative Assembly (MPR), will be elected on the same day with over 180 million eligible voters. Sixteen parties will be participating in the elections nationally - with four participating for the first time.

In the presidential election, which follow a direct, simple majority system, incumbent President of Indonesia Joko Widodo, often known as Jokowi, will run for re-election with senior cleric and Nahdlatul Ulama Supreme Leader Ma'ruf Amin against former general Prabowo Subianto, who had lost against Jokowi in the 2014 presidential election, with businessman and Jakarta Vice Governor Sandiaga Uno for the five-year term between 2019 and 2024.

The legislative election will see over twenty thousand seats in the MPR and the local councils for provinces and cities/regencies all being contested, with over eight thousand competing for the People's Representative Council seats alone.

Background[edit]

In the 2014 presidential election, Jakarta governor Joko Widodo defeated former general Prabowo Subianto to become the 7th President of Indonesia. Despite initially being minority government, Jokowi managed to secure the support of Golkar and the United Development Party, hence controlling the parliament.[1][2] In the legislative elections of the same year, formerly opposition party PDI-P managed to secure the largest share in the parliament, ahead of Golkar and Gerindra.[3]

Between 2014 and 2019, three major waves of local elections were held - in 2015, 2017 and 2018. The 2017 elections included the gubernatorial elections for Jakarta, which saw Jokowi's former deputy Basuki Tjahaja Purnama defeated following a campaigning season described to be filled with identity politics.[4][5] On the other hand, the local elections the following year was described as being more policy-oriented instead.[6]

Despite plans to introduce electronic voting, the People's Representative Council (DPR) in March 2017 announced it would not mandate e-voting in the 2019 elections because of hacking fears and because not all parts of Indonesia have internet access.[7] On 7 April 2017, the General Elections Commission (KPU), the Elections Supervisory Agency (Bawaslu) and the Home Affairs Ministry held a meeting with the People's Representative Council's special committee to deliberate a draft law concerning the 2019 elections.[8] After the meeting, Home Affairs Ministry Secretary General Yuswandi A. Temenggung said the campaign period for the elections would be limited to six months, while the voting day could be on 13, 17, or 19 April 2019. The Chairman of the House's special committee deliberating the bill, Lukman Edy, announced on 25 April 2017 that Wednesday, 17 April 2019, had been agreed upon as the date for the elections.[9]

Nominations of candidates for the national and regional legislatures as well as candidates for president and vice president were completed in September 2018. The campaign period is scheduled to take place from 13 October 2018 to 13 April 2019 followed by a three-day election silence before polling day on 17 April. The final results will be announced between 17 and 23 September. The inauguration of the president and vice president is scheduled for 20 October 2019.[10][11]

Electoral system[edit]

The election is regulated by the Law No. 7 of 2017.[12][13] Responsibility for holding the election falls on the General Elections Commission (Indonesian: Komisi Pemilihan Umum, abbv. KPU), a legally independent government body.[14] In addition, the election is monitored by the Elections Supervisory Body [id] (Indonesian: Badan Pengawas Pemilihan Umum, abbv. Bawaslu), which also has the authority to rule on violations of election rules (e.g. administrative errors, vote buying, etc).[15]

Voters vote on paper ballots, using a nail to poke a hole for the party/candidate they wish to elect.[16]

Presidential[edit]

In order to run for presidency, a candidate must receive support from political parties totaling 20 percent of the seats in the People's Representative Council or 25 percent of the popular vote in the previous legislative election i.e. 2014.[17][13]:Art. 222 Political parties are allowed to remain neutral given that they are unable to support their own candidate. However, if a neutral party/parties could endorse their own candidate (i.e. 20 percent of seats/25 percent of popular votes), they are required to do so, or they would be barred from participating in the next election.[13]:Art. 235[18]

The voting procedure follows a single non-transferable vote system, with voters simply choosing one of the candidates. A winning candidate is required to win a majority, and is also required to win at least 20 percent of the votes in over half of Indonesia' provinces (i.e. 18 provinces). If no candidate pairs had fulfilled the criterion, the election is to be repeated with a maximum of two participants. The law includes a provision in the case of a draw in popular vote when determining the top two places (e.g. three candidates with equal votes or two candidates in the second place), following which the winner is to be determined based on the vote distribution.[13]:Art. 416

Legislative[edit]

Members of both the People's Representative Council (DPR) and the Regional People's Representative Councils (DPRD) are elected from multi-member electoral districts through voting with an open list system.[13][19] The KPU regulates that the maximum number of candidates from a single party is equal to the number of seats available - with an exception in Aceh, where the local provincial council set the limit at 120 percent the number of seats instead for the regional council elections.[20] In addition, there is a gender quota requiring at least 30 percent of registered candidates to be female.[21]

A 4 percent parliamentary threshold exists for parties to be represented in DPR, though candidates could still win seats in the regional councils provided they win sufficient seats.[19][22] There are 575 DPR seats contested - up from 560 in 2014.[19] The election for Regional Representative Council members requires all candidates to not be a member of a political party, with 4 seats being available per province - a total of 136.[23]

Voters[edit]

The voting age for the election is 17, with all married or divorced Indonesian citizens also eligible if they were under the age of 17. The marriage clause in particular received complaints as it may incentivize child marriage.[24] Indonesians who lived abroad could vote in either the embassies and consulates which are to setup polling stations, vote in mobile polling stations, or through postal voting, with the voting taking place on 8-14 April, earlier than the main election event on 17 April.[25]

Prior to the publication of a final voter list (Indonesian: Daftar Pemilih Tetap), KPU had compiled a provisional voter list (Indonesian: Daftar Pemilih Sementara) which was published in June 2018, containing around 186 million names.[26]

KPU in 5 September 2018 announced that there were 187 million registered voters - 185,732,093 in Indonesia and 2,049,791 voting abroad. They were to vote in 805,075 polling stations in Indonesia, with mail-in votes and 620 polling stations outside the country.[27] Later on, 670,000 names were removed following complaints of duplicate names in the voter registry, lowering the total voter count to around 187.1 million.[28] Further investigation resulted in over 1 million duplicate voters discovered in Papua alone in October, out of the initial voter registry of 3 million.[29] Bawaslu commissioners in early September estimated that there would be around 2 million duplicate voters,[30] while opposition party Gerindra stated that they only had 137 million voters in their internal registry, and claimed that they found 25 million duplicate names in the registry.[31]

Contesting parties[edit]

In total, 16 parties will participate in the election on a national level, plus four participating only in Aceh.[32]

A total of 27 political parties had registered to the General Elections Commission to run in the election.[33] On 17 February 2018, the General Elections Commission announced that 14 parties had passed the verification precedes,and would be eligible to contest the legislative election. The Crescent Star Party subsequently appealed to the Elections Supervisory Agency (Bawaslu), which ruled it could participate, making a total of 15 parties.[34][35] The Indonesian Justice and Unity Party's appeal to Bawaslu was rejected, but an 11 April ruling by the National Administrative Court (Pengadilan Tata Usaha Negara) decreed that the party was eligible to contest in the election.[36]

Ballot
number
English Name Indonesian Name Leader
1 National Awakening Party Partai Kebangkitan Bangsa (PKB) Muhaimin Iskandar
2 Great Indonesia Movement Party Partai Gerakan Indonesia Raya (Gerindra) Prabowo Subianto
3 Indonesian Democratic Party - Struggle Partai Demokrasi Indonesia - Perjuangan (PDI-P) Megawati Sukarnoputri
4 Party of the Functional Groups Partai Golongan Karya (Golkar) Airlangga Hartarto
5 Democratic National Party Partai Nasional Demokrat (Nasdem) Surya Paloh
6 Indonesian Transformation Movement Party Partai Gerakan Perubahan Indonesia (Partai Garuda) Ahmad Ridha Sabana
7 Working Party Partai Berkarya Tommy Suharto
8 Prosperous Justice Party Partai Kadilan Sejahtera (PKS) Sohibul Iman
9 Indonesian Unity Party Partai Persatuan Indonesia (Perindo) Hary Tanoesoedibjo
10 United Development Party Partai Persatuan Pembangunan (PPP) Muhammad Romahurmuziy
11 Indonesian Solidarity Party Partai Solidaritas Indonesia (PSI) Grace Natalie
12 National Mandate Party Partai Amanat Nasional (PAN) Zulkifli Hasan
13 People's Conscience Party Partai Hati Nurani Rakyat (Hanura) Oesman Sapta Odang
14 Democratic Party Partai Demokrat Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono
19[a] Crescent Star Party Partai Bulan Bintang (PBB) Yusril Ihza Mahendra
20 Indonesian Justice and Unity Party Partai Keadilan dan Persatuan Indonesia (PKPI) Diaz Hendropriyono

In addition, four local parties will also compete in Aceh to contest seats in the provincial and municipal councils:[38]

Ballot
number
English Name Indonesian Name
15 Aceh Party Partai Aceh
16 Independent Voice of the Acehnese Party Suara Independen Rakyat Aceh
17 Aceh Regional Party Partai Daerah Aceh
18 Aceh Nanggroe Party Partai Nanggroe Aceh

Presidential election[edit]

Candidates[edit]

In July 2017, the People's Representative Council (DPR) confirmed that only parties or coalitions with at least 20% of seats in the legislature, or 25% of votes in the previous election, would be eligible to submit a presidential candidate.[39] Requirements for presidential/vice presidential candidates are similar, with only either Indonesia-born lifelong Indonesian citizens or naturalized citizens who were born abroad and obtained a foreign citizenship outside their own will being eligible to run with a minimum age of 40 and a requirement to "have a belief in the One and Only God". If the candidates have spouses, they must also be Indonesian citizens. A criminal record resulting in over 5 years of incarceration or an active bankruptcy also bars a candidate from running. A term limit of two terms is in place, barring incumbent vice president Jusuf Kalla from running as a vice presidential candidate.[40][13]:Art. 169

While a rematch between Joko Widodo and Prabowo Subianto had been considered for some time, there were initial doubts over the likelihood of Prabowo's second bid for presidency, due to the parliamentary seat requirement of 20 percent which required his party Gerindra to form a coalition; on the other hand, Jokowi received strong support from two largest parties in the parliament - PDI-P and Golkar.[41] There were considerations of a possible single candidate race,[41] Prabowo endorsing another candidate,[42] or even him running as Jokowi's running mate.[43][44] However, despite Jokowi's significant lead in the opinion polls, no other candidate polled close to either him or Prabowo.[45]

Registration for presidential candidates was opened between 4 and 10 August 2018 at the General Elections Commission head office in Jakarta.[46] Neither candidate declared their vice presidential pick until 9 August 2018, when both declared their running mates. Both picks were considered "surprising" - with Jokowi selecting senior cleric and politician Ma'ruf Amin despite early reports that lawyer Mahfud MD would be selected. Prabowo's last-minute selection of businessman and Jakarta vice governor Sandiaga Uno - close to midnight on that day - was also unexpected, Sandiaga not having been mentioned in the early phases of the selection.[47][48]

Nominated[edit]

Others[edit]

Other notable individuals who expressed an intent, received political support, or was widely considered as a prospective candidate to run as president include:

Note J : Endorsed Jokowi, P : Endorsed Prabowo, N : Expressed neutrality

Party support[edit]

Except for the National Mandate Party, all parties in the government coalition supported a second term for Jokowi.[65] In total, 9 parties running in the legislative election supported Jokowi, with the coalition having formally met by May 2018. Out of the nine parties, two (Indonesian Unity Party and Indonesian Solidarity Party) are parties participating for the first time in elections.[66] Shortly after Ma'ruf was declared as Jokowi's VP candidate, Jokowi's coalition member party PPP leader Muhammad Romahurmuziy stated that the coalition, dubbed Koalisi Indonesia Kerja (lit. "Working Indonesia Coalition"),[67] was final, and was not accepting any more parties.[68] In total, the coalition gained over 62 percent of the votes during the 2014 legislative election and controlled 337 of 560 DPR seats.

Aside from Gerindra, Prabowo's supporting parties did not confirm their support until late - PAN and PKS on 9 August,[69][70] Demokrat and Berkarya on the 10th,[71][72] the registration day, though the coalition had existed prior.[73] PAN withdrew from the government coalition - resulting in the resignation of bureaucratic reform minister and PAN member Asman Abnur.[74] The coalition was named Koalisi Indonesia Adil Makmur (lit. "Prosperous and Just Indonesia Coalition").[75] In total, there are five parties in the coalition - including Berkarya, a new party[76] - which amounted to 36 percent of the 2014 legislative vote, and is represented by 223 of 560 DPR seats.

Two parties - the Crescent Star Party/PBB (participated in the 2014 election, but did not gain a national legislature seat) and the Garuda Party (a new party) - did not endorse either candidates. The latter's secretary Abdullah Mansyuri stated that the party was focusing on the legislative elections, while PBB's chairman Yusril Ihza Mahendra remarked that neither Jokowi nor Prabowo's camp invited PBB.[77][78] Later on, however, Mahendra would join Jokowi's campaign team as its lawyer.[79]

Ballot No. Party DPR seats 2014 votes Candidate
1 National Awakening Party 47 9.04% Joko Widodo[80]
3 Indonesian Democratic Party - Struggle 109 18.95%
4 Party of the Functional Groups 91 14.75%
5 Nasdem Party 35 6.72%
9 Indonesian Unity Party new party
10 United Development Party 39 6.53%
11 Indonesian Solidarity Party new party
13 People's Conscience Party 16 5.26%
20 Indonesian Justice and Unity Party 0 0.91%
2 Great Indonesia Movement Party 73 11.81% Prabowo Subianto[81]
7 Berkarya Party new party
8 Prosperous Justice Party 40 6.79%
12 National Mandate Party 49 7.59%
14 Democratic Party 61 10.19%
6 Garuda Party new party Neutral[77][78]
19 Crescent Star Party 0 1.46%

Campaigns[edit]

The official campaigning period is planned to last around 6 months, starting with a "peaceful campaign" declaration on 23 September 2018, with it being scheduled to last until 13 April 2019.[82] Prior to the start of the campaign, both parties submitted their campaign teams to the KPU, with Jokowi's team being lead by businessman Erick Thohir while Prabowo's was lead by former Indonesian National Armed Forces panglima Djoko Santoso.[83]

Debates[edit]

KPU scheduled for five debates to be held in 2019, the same amount as it was in 2014. People's Representative Council member and National Mandate Party Central Committee chairman Yandri Susanto proposed that the debates should be held in English, although KPU decided that the debates will be held in Indonesian.[84][85]

Finances[edit]

On 23 September, both campaign teams submitted an initial budget, with Jokowi's campaign team reporting an initial balance of Rp 11.9 billion and Prabowo's team reporting Rp 2 billion. Indonesia Corruption Watch observers deemed the initial numbers "unrealistic" (Widodo's campaign team spent Rp 293 billion in 2014, Prabowo's spent Rp 166 billion), though representatives from both campaign teams noted that the balance was just an initial balance, and would increase throughout the campaigning period.[86]

Polls[edit]

By late 2018, Jokowi was ahead of Prabowo in most surveys.[87][88] The table below gives detailed survey results from a variety of organizations.

NOTE: The accuracy of political surveys in Indonesia vary significantly, with some having little transparency. It should also be noted that some agencies also act as political consultants and surveys are often paid for by candidates.[89] Caution should hence be exercised in using the polling data below.

Polls conducted after nominations
Pollster Date Sample size Widodo Prabowo
Kompas 24 September-5 October 2018 1,200 52.6 32.7
SMRC 7-24 September 2018 1,074 60.4 29.8
Indikator 1-6 September 2018 1,220 57.7 32.3
Y-Publica 13-23 August 2018 1,200 52.7 28.6
LSI 12-19 August 2018 1,200 52.2 29.5
Alvara 12-18 August 2018 1,500 53.5 35.2

NOTE: See warning above

Polls conducted before nominations
Pollster Date Sample size Widodo Prabowo Kalla Nurmantyo Yudhoyono Baswedan Purnama Tanoesoedibjo Hasan Iskandar
RTK 23 July-1 Aug 2018 1,610 42.5 21.3 0.4 1.6 3.1 0.8 0.4 0.2 1.8
Median 19 April-5 May 2018 2,100 35.70 22.60 6.80 5.20
Median (head to head) 19 April-5 May 2018 2,100 58.20 26.60
Polcomm 3-6 May 2018 1,200 36.42 27.17 4.92 4.33 3.5 2.5
IDM (head to head) 28 Apr - 8 May 2018 2,450 29.8 50.1
IDM 28 Apr - 8 May 2018 2,450 26.4 40.1 8.2 6.3
RTK 21 Apr - 21 May 2018 1,610 38.5 20.5 1.6 2.7 0.9
Indo Barometer 15-22 Apr 2018 2,000 40.7 19.7 1.2 2.7 2.0 2.4 0.9 1.0 0.3 0.5
Charta Politika 13-19 Apr 2018 2,000 51.2 23.3 2.0 5.5 2.7 3.4 0.6
INES 12 - 28 April 2018 2,180 27.7 50.2 7.4
Cyrus 27 March-3 April 2018 1,230 56.7 19.8 1.6 3.2 2.1 1.6 2.2
Median 24 March-6 April 2018 1,200 36.2 20.4 4.3 7.0 1.8 2.0 1.6
Kompas 21 March-1 April 2018 1,200 55.9 14.1 1.8
KedaiKOPI 19-27 March 2018 1,135 48.3 21.5 2.1 1.1 1.1 0.5
Populi Center 7–16 February 2018 1,200 64.3 25.3
Median 1–9 February 2018 1,000 35.0 21.2 5.5 3.3 4.5
Poltracking 27 January-3 February 2018 1,200 45.4 19.8 0.5 0.3 0.8 0.6 0.3
Indo Barometer 23–30 January 2018 1,200 32.7 19.1 2.1 2.7 2.5 2.5 2.9 0.8
SMRC 7–13 December 2017 1,220 38.9 10.5 0.9 1.2 1.7 1.3
PolMark 13–25 November 2017 2,600 50.2 22.0 0.7 2.0 4.8 4.5 1.6
Indo Barometer 15–23 November 2017 1,200 34.9 12.1 3.2 2.5 3.6 3.3
Poltracking 8–15 November 2017 2,400 41.5 18.2 0.9 0.8 0.8 0.5
Populi Center 19–26 October 2017 1,200 49.4 21.7 0.4 2.0 0.7 0.7
PolMark 22 October 2017 2,250 41.2 21 2.9
Median 2 October 2017 1,000 36.2 23.2 2.6 2.8 4.4
Indikator 17–24 September 2017 1,220 34.2 11.5 0.7 0.5 0.5 0.5 1
SMRC 3–10 September 2017 1,220 38.9 12 0.8 0.3 0.3 0.9 0.8 0.6
SMRC 14–20 May 2017 1,500 53.7 37.2
SMRC 14–20 May 2017 1,500 34.1 17.2 0.4 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.9 1.1
Kompas April 2017 41.6 22.1

NOTE: See warning above

Legislative election[edit]

Vice President Jusuf Kalla claimed that the election will be the most complicated in the world, lending to the fact that voters would have to cast five ballots - for the President and Vice President, DPD, DPR, provincial and regency/municipal DPRD members, estimating that there were 400 factors that needed to be considered.[90]

Contested seats[edit]

Legislative elections in Indonesia: April 2019[91]
Level Institution Seats contested Change from 2014
National People's Representative Council
Dewan Perwakilan Rakyat (DPR)
575 Increase15
National Regional Representative Council
Dewan Perwakilan Daerah (DPD)
136 Increase4[b]
Provincial
Provinsi
People's Regional Representative Council Level I
Dewan Perwakilan Rakyat Daerah I (DPRD I)
2,207 Increase95
Regency/Municipal
Kabupaten/Kota
People's Regional Representative Council Level II
Dewan Perwakilian Rakyat Daerah II (DPRD II)
17,610 Increase715
Total 20,389 Increase829

Candidates[edit]

All legislative candidates must be an Indonesian citizen, over 21 years old, have graduated from senior high school (or equivalent), and have never been convicted for a crime resulting with a sentence of 5 years or more. In addition, the candidates must be endorsed by a political party, and are required to resign from their non-legislative government offices - except for the President and Vice President - or their state-owned company positions to run. Legislators running for reelection or for another body through a new political party are also required to resign.[93]

For the People's Representative Council, there are 7,968 candidates - 4,774 males and 3,194 females - contesting the 575 seats for an average of 13.86 candidates per seat available. Just three parties - Nasdem, PAN and PKB - used their entire quota of 575 candidates, with PKPI registering as little as 137 candidates.[94] Formappi, a NGO, found that 529 out of 560 (94 percent) incumbent DPR members were running for reelection.[95]

The election for Regional Representative Council members requires all candidate to not be a member of a political party, with a total of 807 candidates competing for the 136 seats. The incumbent speaker, Oesman Sapta Odang, was briefly removed from the candidacy list due to him not resigning from Hanura, though he was restored when he submitted a resignation letter. Although all provinces are allocated 4 seats, the number of candidates vary from 10 for West Papua to 49 for West Java.[96][97] The KPU has not released exact figures for the total number of candidates for local councils, but the number was predicted to be in the "hundreds of thousands".[98][99] As an example figure, 1,586 candidates are approved to run for the 120-seat West Java Provincial Council alone.[100]

Polls[edit]

NOTE: The accuracy of political surveys in Indonesia vary significantly, with some having little transparency. It should also be noted that some agencies also act as political consultants and surveys are often paid for by candidates.[89] Caution should hence be exercised in using the polling data below.

Polls for the 2019 Indonesian legislative election
Pollster Date Sample size PDI-P Golkar Gerindra Demokrat PKB PKS PAN PPP Hanura Nasdem PBB Perindo PSI Berkarya Garuda PKPI
Median 19 April-5 May 2018 1,200 26.00 8.80 16.50 8.60 8.70 3.00 3.40 2.80 0.70 2.70 0.20 3.50 0.30 0.20 0.20
Polcomm 3-6 May 2018 1,200 22.92 7.92 17.5 6.17 3.42 2.83 3.25 1.17 0.58 1.75 0.42 1.75 0.33
LSI 28 Apr–5 May 2018 1,200 21.7 15.3 14.7 5.8 6.2 2.2 2.5 1.8 0.7 2.3 0.4 2.3 0.1 0.1 0.3 0.1
Charta Politika 13-19 Apr 2018 2,000 24.9 11 12.3 5 7 3.5 2.8 3.8 0.6 3.6 0.7 4.0 0.2 0.2
Cyrus 27 Mar–3 Apr 2018 1,239 26.9 11.5 11.5 5.0 7.3 3.5 1.5 4.3 1.0 3.3 0.2 4.3 0.3 0.8 0.3
Indikator 25-31 Mar 2018 1,200 27.7 8.0 11.4 6.6 5.8 4.0 1.9 3.5 0.5 2.7 0.3 4.6 0.2 0.3 0.7
Median 24 Mar–6 Apr 2018 1,200 21.1 9.3 15 8.1 8.5 2.9 2 3.6 0.7 2.4
Kompas 21 Mar–1 Apr 2018 1,200 33.3 7.2 10.9 2.8 4.9 2.4 1.3 2.2 2.5 1.5
Poltracking 27 Jan–3 Feb 2018 1,200 26.5 11.3 13.4 6.6 6 4.6 3.6 2.7 2.3 3.3 0.5 2.1 2.1
LSI 7–14 Jan 2018 1,200 22.2 15.5 11.4 6.2 6 3.8 2 3.5 0.7 4.2 0.3 3 0.3
Indikator 17–24 Sep 2017 1,220 23.6 12 10.3 8 5.5 3.3 1.9 4.6 0.9 2 0.5 2.5 0.4
PolMark 9–20 Sep 2017 2,250 25.1 9.2 7.1 5.3 6.3 2.4 3.6 2.4 0.3 2.8 0.2 1.7
SMRC 3–10 Sep 2017 1,220 27.1 11.4 10.2 6.9 5.5 4.4 3.6 4.3 1.3 2.4 0.1 2

NOTE: See warning above

Controversy[edit]

In July 2018, KPU passed a regulation barring ex-corruption convicts, sexual offenders and people convicted of drug offenses from running for office.[101] However, the Elections Supervisory Body and the People's Representative Council objected to the regulation, and accused KPU of violating the 2017 election law.[102] The Supreme Court of Indonesia eventually ruled that the KPU regulation was invalid, allowing the aforementioned convicts to contest in the election.[103] 38 people who had been corruption convicts eventually ran for office across the country - 26 for regency/municipal councils and 12 for provincial councils.[104]

KPU was also criticized for giving legislative candidates an option to not publish their past track records - Formappi found that around a quarter of the candidates chose to not publish their information, with a further 18 percent not having submitted any. Some candidates noted that they wished to publish their information, but could not due to technical reasons with the KPU's website.[95][105]

Budget[edit]

A budget of Rp 24.9 trillion (USD 1.7 billion) was allocated for the election - 3 percent higher than the budget used in the 2014 election. The budget included spending on "safeguarding the election from hijacking".[106] KPU estimated a Rp 16.8 trillion funding requirement in December 2017,[107] later revising it to Rp 15 trillion for a one-stage election,[108] and ended up submitting a funding request of Rp 18.1 trillion, on top of the Rp 8.6 trillion requested by Bawaslu, in September 2018.[109]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Ballot numbers 15-18 are assigned to local parties in the province of Aceh[37]
  2. ^ Due to the formation of North Kalimantan, which was unrepresented between 2014-2019[92]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Jokowi vs. Prabowo: Who Will Win in 2019?". Jakarta Globe. Retrieved 24 September 2018.
  2. ^ Chandran, Nyshka (18 October 2016). "Two years on, Indonesian President Jokowi is just getting started". CNBC. Retrieved 24 September 2018.
  3. ^ "Indonesian opposition party leads parliamentary poll". BBC. 10 April 2014. Retrieved 4 December 2018.
  4. ^ "Fears of Muslim Identity Politics in 2019 Presidential Election". Jakarta Globe. Retrieved 24 September 2018.
  5. ^ "'Political Islam' Threatens Indonesia's Jokowi - Asia Sentinel". Asia Sentinel. 9 April 2018. Retrieved 24 September 2018.
  6. ^ Allard, Tom (28 June 2018). "Islamists fail to sway regional Indonesian elections". Reuters. Retrieved 4 December 2018.
  7. ^ "House to not apply e-voting in 2019 elections". The Jakarta Post. 30 March 2017. Retrieved 3 May 2017.
  8. ^ "RUU Pemilu: Pemilu Serentak Legislatif dan Presiden Bulan April 2019". Komisi Pemilihan Umum Republik Indonesia. KPU. Retrieved 8 June 2017.
  9. ^ Anugrah (25 April 2017). "Pemilu 2019: Rabu 17 April 2019". Harian Terbit. Retrieved 8 June 2017.
  10. ^ Moh. Nadlir (28 February 2018). "Ini Tahapan dan Jadwal Lengkap Pemilu 2019 (Here is the Schedule for the 2019 Elections)" (in Indonesian). Kompas. Retrieved 16 March 2018.
  11. ^ Rini Lestar (2 October 2017). "Catat! Ini Jadwal Lengkap Tahapan Pemilu 2019 (Note! This is the Schedule for the 2019 Elections)" (in Indonesian). OkeZone News. Retrieved 16 March 2018.
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