Datnioides microlepis

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Datnioides microlepis
Captive in Siam Ocean World
Scientific classification Edit this classification
Domain: Eukaryota
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Spariformes
Family: Lobotidae
Genus: Datnioides
Species:
D. microlepis
Binomial name
Datnioides microlepis
Bleeker, 1854
Synonyms
  • Coius microlepis (Bleeker, 1854)

Datnioides microlepis, also known as the Indonesian tiger perch, Indo datmoid, Indonesian tigerfish, or finescale tigerfish, is a species of freshwater ray-finned fish belonging to the family Lobotidae, the tripletails and tiger perches. This species is endemic to the Malay Peninsula and Indonesia (Sumatra and Kalimantan).

Taxonomy[edit]

Datnioides microlepis was first formally described in 1854 by the Dutch physician, herpetologist and ichthyologist Pieter Bleeker with its type locality given as the Kapuas River at Pontianak, Kalimantan, Indonesia.[2] This taxon was considered to be conspecific with the Siamese tigerfish (D. pulcher), which was included in D. microlepis until 1998.[3][4] The 5th edition of the Fishes of the World classifies this genus as one of two genera in the family Lobotidae, alongside the tripletails in the genus Lobotes, which it places in the order Spariformes.[5]

Etymology[edit]

Datnioides microlepis has the specific name microlepis which means "small scales", an allusion to the snmaller scales of this species compared to D. polota.[6]

Description[edit]

Datnioides microlepis has the deepest body of the species in the genus Datnioides, its standard length being 2.1 to 2.4 times its depth. The maximum published total length for this species is 55 cm (22 in), making it the largest species of Datnioides.[7][8] It may be identified from its congeners by having 6 or 7 broad dark vertical bars on the body, with a yellowish-grey background colour. The band nearest the head typically runs unbroken over the operculum and over the throat. There is an obvious black marking just in front of the base of the pelvic fin. The part of the back in front of the dorsal fin is straight.[9]

Distribution and habitat[edit]

Datnioides microlepis is found in Perak, Johor and Selangor in Peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra and western Kalimantan on Borneo in large lowland rivers, sometimes entering brackish waters.[1] It often prefers areas with an abundance of submerged branches and is found in flooded forest.[7] Records of this species from the drainage basins of the Chao Praya and Mekong are thought to refer to the Siamese tigerfish.[9]

Biology[edit]

Datnioides microlepis is a predatory species, adults feed on crustaceans and smaller fishes, as well as annelids and insects, while juveniles feed on zooplankton.[7] Adults are solitary and aggressive to other members of its species while the juveniles will gather in groups. In the Kapuas River the local fishermen have observed that this species spawns in April and May.[9]

Utilisation[edit]

Datnioides microlepis is a food fish and overfishing, as well as pollution, threaten the populations in some areas. It is a rare item in the aquarium trade.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Ahmad, A.B. (2020). "Datnioides microlepis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2020: e.T89808868A89808887. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2020-2.RLTS.T89808868A89808887.en. Retrieved 16 February 2023.
  2. ^ Eschmeyer, William N.; Fricke, Ron & van der Laan, Richard (eds.). "Species in the genus Datnioides". Catalog of Fishes. California Academy of Sciences. Retrieved 27 October 2023.
  3. ^ Kottelat, M. (1998). "Fishes of the Nam Theun and Xe Bangfai basins, Laos, with diagnoses of twenty-two new species (Teleostei: Cyprinidae, Balitoridae, Cobitidae, Coiidae and Odontobutidae". Ichthyological Exploration of Freshwaters. 9 (1): 1–128.
  4. ^ Kottelat, M. (2013). "The fishes of the inland waters of southeast Asia: a catalogue and core bibliography of the fishes known to occur in freshwaters, mangroves and estuaries". Raffles Bulletin of Zoology. 27: 1–663.
  5. ^ Nelson, J.S.; Grande, T.C.; Wilson, M.V.H. (2016). Fishes of the World (5th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons. pp. 502–506. doi:10.1002/9781119174844. ISBN 978-1-118-34233-6. LCCN 2015037522. OCLC 951899884. OL 25909650M.
  6. ^ "Series EUPERCARIA (Incertae sedis): Families CALLANTHIIDAE, CENTROGENYIDAE, DINOPERCIDAE, EMMELICHTHYIDAE, MALACANTHIDAE, MONODACTYLIDAE, MORONIDAE, PARASCORPIDIDAE, SCIAENIDAE and SILLAGINIDAE". The ETYFish Project Fish Name Etymology Database. Christopher Scharpf. 9 March 2023. Retrieved 26 October 2023.
  7. ^ a b c Froese, Rainer; Pauly, Daniel (eds.) (2023). "Datnoides microlepis" in FishBase. June 2023 version.
  8. ^ Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2023). Species of Datnioides in FishBase. June 2023 version.
  9. ^ a b c "Datnioides microlepis Bleeker, 1854 Indonesian Tiger Perch". SeriouslyFish. Retrieved 5 January 2020.