Industrial rock

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Industrial rock is a musical genre that fuses industrial music and specific rock subgenres.

Origins[edit]

Experimental '60s group Cromagnon are said to have been one of the bands that helped foresee the birth of industrial rock.[1] Specifically, their song "Caledonia" has been noted for its "pre-industrial stomp".[2] Industrial music was created in the mid- to late 1970s, amidst the punk rock revolution and disco fever. Prominent early industrial musicians include Throbbing Gristle, Cabaret Voltaire, NON, SPK and Z'EV.[3] Many other artists have been cited as influences such as Kraftwerk and Gary Numan and Tubeway Army as well as Einstürzende Neubauten. Many other musical performers were incorporating industrial-musical elements into a variety of musical styles.

Some post-punk performers developed styles parallel to industrial music's defining attributes. Pere Ubu's debut, The Modern Dance, was described as "industrial".[4] So was San Francisco's Chrome, who mixed Jimi Hendrix, The Sex Pistols and tape music experiments,[5] and Killing Joke, considered by Simon Reynolds as "a post-punk version of heavy metal".[6] According to Chris Connelly, Foetus "is the instigator when it comes to the marriage of machinery to hardcore punk."[7]

Others followed in their wake.[8] The New York City band Swans were inspired by the local No Wave scene, as well as punk rock, noise music (particularly Whitehouse) and the original industrial groups.[9] Steve Albini's Big Black followed a similar path,[10] while also incorporating American hardcore punk.[11] Big Black has also been closely associated with post-hardcore and noise rock, though their ties to industrial music are extremely apparent. The Swiss trio The Young Gods, who deliberately eschewed electric guitars in favor of a sampler,[12] also took inspiration from both hardcore and industrial,[13] being equally indebted to the Bad Brains and Foetus.

Industrial rock's true commercial breakthrough took place with the rise of the industrial metal bands, Ministry and Nine Inch Nails.[14]

Labels[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.allmusic.com/album/r966068
  2. ^ "The 200 Greatest Songs of the 1960s - Page 4 - Pitchfork". pitchfork.com. Retrieved 20 February 2017. 
  3. ^ Vale & Juno, 1983.
  4. ^ Irvin, 2001, p. 442.
  5. ^ Reynolds, 2005, p. 257, 258.
  6. ^ Reynolds, 2005, p. 435.
  7. ^ Connelly, 2007, p. 12.
  8. ^ Chantler, 2002, p. 54.
  9. ^ Licht, 2003, p. 32.
  10. ^ Blush, 2001, p. 222.
  11. ^ Sharp, 1999, p. 48.
  12. ^ Mörat, 1992, p. 12.
  13. ^ Stud & Stud, 1987, p. 27.
  14. ^ "GOLD AND PLATINUM - Searchable Database". RIAA. Retrieved 2007-12-12.  External link in |publisher= (help)

Further reading[edit]

  • Blush, Steven (2001). American Hardcore: A tribal history. Los Angeles, CA: Feral House.
  • Chantler, Chris (2002). "Splitting heirs". Terrorizer, 96: 54-5.
  • Connelly, Chris (2007). Concrete, Bulletproof, Invisible + Fried: My Life as a Revolting Cock. London: SAF Publishing.
  • Irvin, Jim (2001). The Mojo Collection: The greatest albums of all time. Edinburgh: Canongate.
  • Licht, Alan (2003). "Tunnel vision". The Wire, 233: 30-37.
  • Mörat (1992). "Ye gods!" Kerrang!, 411: 12.
  • Reynolds, Simon (2005). Rip it up and start again: Postpunk 1978-1984. London: Faber and Faber Limited.
  • Sharp, Chris (1999). "Atari Teenage Riot: 60 second wipe out". The Wire, 183: 48-49.
  • Stud, B. & Stud, T. (1987, June 20). "Heaven up here". Melody Maker: 26-27.
  • Vale, Vivian; Juno, Andrea (1983). RE/Search #6-#7: Industrial culture handbook. San Francisco, CA: RE/SEARCH PUBLICATIONS.