Innuendo Studios

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Ian Danskin
Personal information
NationalityAmerican
Websiteinnuendostudios.com
YouTube information
Channel
Years active2015–present
Subscribers406,000[1]
Total views33,000,000[1]
YouTube Silver Play Button 2.svg 100,000 subscribers

Last updated: August 31, 2022

Ian Danskin is an American YouTuber who produces the Innuendo Studios channel where he discusses politics from a left-wing perspective.[2][3][4] He is primarily known for "The Alt-Right Playbook" series of videos.[2] The channel has been described as part of "BreadTube", an informal group of left-wing YouTube channels.[2]

The first "Alt-Right Playbook" episode was released in October 2017. Since then the series has focused on examining and dismantling the online culture of the alt-right[5] and "the rhetorical strategies [it] uses to legitimize itself and gain power."[2][6] It uses drawings of simple figures on a grey background to illustrate its ideas.[3]

Danskin has also discussed the Gamergate harassment campaign and the techniques used by Gamergate members to recruit people into their movement.[2]

Daniel Schindel of Polygon listed Danskin's video "Lady Eboshi is Wrong" as one of the best video essays of 2018.[7][8] Julie Muncy of Gizmodo lauded Danskin's video series about the 2015 post-apocalyptic action movie Mad Max: Fury Road.[9] His video on Phil Fish covered the celebrity status of game developers and was the reason for Markus "Notch" Persson, creator of Minecraft, to sell the game to Microsoft.[10][11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "About Innuendo Studios". YouTube.
  2. ^ a b c d e Somos, Christy (October 25, 2019). "Dismantling the 'Alt-Right Playbook': YouTuber explains how online radicalization works". CTV News. Archived from the original on April 27, 2022. Retrieved March 31, 2020.
  3. ^ a b van den Berg, Pim (October 8, 2019). "Dit zijn de linkse YouTubers die tegenwicht geven aan extreem-rechts". VN (in Dutch). Archived from the original on November 4, 2021. Retrieved May 21, 2020.
  4. ^ McCrea, Aisling (February 15, 2019). "The magical thinking of guys who love logic". The Outline. Archived from the original on June 11, 2022. Retrieved September 22, 2020.
  5. ^ Rouner, Jef (January 21, 2019). "5 Myths About the Alt-Right". Houston Press. Archived from the original on March 21, 2022. Retrieved September 22, 2020.
  6. ^ Danskin, Ian (October 11, 2017). "The Alt-Right Playbook: Introduction". YouTube. Retrieved April 4, 2020.
  7. ^ Schindel, Daniel (December 28, 2018). "The best video essays of 2018". Polygon. Archived from the original on April 6, 2022. Retrieved May 21, 2020.
  8. ^ Note: The video is no longer available on YouTube and can be found at: Danskin, Ian (August 31, 2019). Lady Eboshi is Wrong. Vimeo. Retrieved July 5, 2022.
  9. ^ Muncy, Julie (September 30, 2018). "This Fabulous Video Series Unpacks the Gender Dynamics of Mad Max: Fury Road". Gizmodo. Archived from the original on August 21, 2022. Retrieved May 21, 2020.
  10. ^ Good, Owen S. (September 15, 2014). "Here's the video that made Notch question his connection to Minecraft's fans". Polygon. Archived from the original on June 30, 2022. Retrieved August 21, 2022.
  11. ^ Plante, Chris (September 15, 2014). "Watch the YouTube video that helped the creator of 'Minecraft' say goodbye". The Verge. Archived from the original on November 11, 2020. Retrieved August 21, 2022.

External links[edit]