Insectoid

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
A small robot designed to replicate insect functionality

The term insectoid denotes any creature or object that shares a similar body or traits with common earth insects and arachnids. The term is a combination of "insect" and "-oid" (a suffix denoting similarity).

Description[edit]

Technology[edit]

In technology, insectoid robots such as hexapods have been designed for scientific or military uses. Research continues to miniaturize these robots to be used as flying spies or scouts.[1] Insectoid features may also increase the effectiveness of robots in traversing various terrains.[2]

In other media[edit]

Insect-like creatures have been a part of the tradition of science fiction and fantasy. In the 1902 film A Trip to the Moon, Georges Méliès portrayed the Selenites of the moon as insectoid.[3] Olaf Stapledon incorporates insectiods in his 1937 Star Maker novel.[4] In the pulp fiction novels, insectoid creatures were frequently used as the antagonists threatening the damsel in distress.[5] Later depictions of the hostile insect aliens include the antagonists in Robert A. Heinlein's Starship Troopers novel[6] and the "buggers" in Orson Scott Card's Ender novels.[7]

The hive queen has been a theme of novels including C. J. Cherryh's Serpent's Reach[8] and the Alien film franchise.[9] Sexuality has been addressed in Philip Jose Farmer's "The Lovers"[10] Octavia Butler's Xenogenesis novels[11] and China Miéville's Perdido Street Station[12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Scientists developing small robotic drones to become part of Air Force's arsenal". PhysOrg. 2008-09-17. Archived from the original on 2008-09-20. 
  2. ^ "Insectoid robot mimics animal walking styles". TechRadar. 2007-07-25. 
  3. ^ Creed, Barbara (2009). Darwin's Screens: Evolutionary Aesthetics, Time and Sexual Display in the Cinema. Academic Monographs. pp. 47–. ISBN 9780522852585. Retrieved 31 March 2014. 
  4. ^ Prucher, Jeff (2007-03-21). Brave New Words: The Oxford Dictionary of Science Fiction. Oxford University Press. pp. 99–. ISBN 9780199885527. Retrieved 31 March 2014. 
  5. ^ Caroti, Simone (2011-04-14). The Generation Starship in Science Fiction: A Critical History, 1934-2001. McFarland. pp. 63–. ISBN 9780786485765. Retrieved 31 March 2014. 
  6. ^ Roberts, Adam (2006-06-19). Science Fiction. Routledge. pp. 72–. ISBN 9781134211784. Retrieved 31 March 2014. 
  7. ^ Spinrad, Norman (1990). Science Fiction in the Real World. SIU Press. pp. 26–. ISBN 9780809316717. Retrieved 31 March 2014. 
  8. ^ Westfahl, Gary (2005). The Greenwood Encyclopedia of Science Fiction and Fantasy: Themes, Works, and Wonders. Greenwood Publishing Group. pp. 538–. ISBN 9780313329524. Retrieved 31 March 2014. 
  9. ^ Jr., Istvan Csicsery-Ronay (2008). The Seven Beauties of Science Fiction. Wesleyan University Press. pp. 210–. ISBN 9780819568892. Retrieved 31 March 2014. 
  10. ^ Mann, George (2012-03-01). The Mammoth Encyclopedia of Science Fiction. Constable & Robinson Limited. pp. 1915–. ISBN 9781780337043. Retrieved 31 March 2014. 
  11. ^ Bould, Mark; Butler, Andrew; Roberts, Adam; Vint, Sherryl, eds. (2009-09-10). Fifty Key Figures in Science Fiction. Routledge. pp. 44–. ISBN 9781135285340. Retrieved 31 March 2014. 
  12. ^ Westfahl, Gary (2005-01-01). The Greenwood Encyclopedia of Science Fiction and Fantasy: Themes, Works, and Wonders. Greenwood Publishing Group. pp. 1201–. ISBN 9780313329531. Retrieved 31 March 2014.