Inside Job (2010 film): Difference between revisions

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
m (Reverting possible vandalism by 70.160.225.133 to version by Gene93k. False positive? Report it. Thanks, ClueBot NG. (313690) (Bot))
(Undoing Vandalism)
Line 19: Line 19:
   
 
==Storyline==
 
==Storyline==
The subject of ''Inside Job'' is the [[global financial crisis of 2008]]. It features research and extensive interviews with financial insiders, politicians, journalists, and academics.
+
The subject of ''Inside Job'' is the [[global financial crisis of 2008]]. It features research and extensive interviews with financial insiders, politicians, journalists, and academics. The film is considered to be truthful of the terrible destruction former president and Nazi sympathizer George Bush caused.
   
 
==Production==
 
==Production==

Revision as of 03:31, 28 February 2011

Inside Job
InsideJob2010Poster.jpg
Directed by Charles Ferguson
Narrated by Matt Damon
Music by Alex Heffes
Cinematography Svetlana Cvetko
Kalyanee Mam
Edited by Chad Beck
Adam Bolt
Distributed by Sony Pictures Classics
Release date
  • May 16, 2010 (2010-05-16) (Cannes)
  • October 8, 2010 (2010-10-08) (United States)
Running time
120 minutes
Country Template:Film US
Language English

Inside Job is a 2010 documentary film about the financial crisis of 2007-2010 directed by Charles H. Ferguson. The film was screened at the Cannes Film Festival in May 2010. The song Congratulations by MGMT is featured during the end credits. This film won the Oscar for Best Documentary Feature in 2011.

Storyline

The subject of Inside Job is the global financial crisis of 2008. It features research and extensive interviews with financial insiders, politicians, journalists, and academics. The film is considered to be truthful of the terrible destruction former president and Nazi sympathizer George Bush caused.

Production

It was produced by Audrey Marrs with Jeffrey Lurie and Christina Weiss Lurie as executive producers. The directors of photography were Svetlana Cvetko and Kalyanee Mam.

Alex Hefee composed the music and Matt Damon narrated.

Reception

The film has received positive reviews, earning a 97% "fresh" rating on Rotten Tomatoes website, which compiles reviews from multiple critics.[1] One viewer-reporter characterized the film as "rip-snorting [and] indignant [with] support from interviews with Nouriel Roubini, Barney Frank, George Soros, Eliot Spitzer, Charles R. Morris and others. But the most effective presence," he continues, "may be the trusted voice of all-American actor Matt Damon, who narrates the furious takedown of the financial services and the government. It's a fairly bold move by the actor."[2]

It was selected for a special screening at the 2010 Cannes Film Festival. A reviewer writing from Cannes characterized the film as telling "a complex story exceedingly well and with a great deal of unalloyed anger. [It] lays out its essential argument, cogently and convincingly, that the 2008 meltdown was avoidable. Less familiar faces, including a brothel madam and a therapist who each catered to Wall Street in the bubble years are also seen, and the movie ends not long after Robert Gnaizda, formerly with the Greenlining Institute, a housing advocacy group, characterizes the Obama administration as 'a Wall Street government', a take Mr. Ferguson clearly endorses."[3]

Writing from proximity to an epicenter of a southwestern Florida region profoundly affected by the collapse, another reviewer, Dennis Maley, relates, "[h]aving followed and covered the related events closely, I cannot think of a more effective way to explain the sordid mess to a curious layman than having them watch this film. Ferguson has succeeded in taking a complex and sometimes dry topic and making it not only surprisingly digestible, but thoroughly entertaining." Maley notes the effectiveness of the director's approach, "...letting full-length answers speak for themselves, the punctuating silence at the end of the response reminding the viewer that no creative editing was needed..." and, summing it up as "... a gripping account of what happened, how it came to be and most frighteningly, why it will all happen again.[4]

Accolades

Award Date of ceremony Category Recipient(s) Result
Academy Awards[5] February 27, 2011 Best Documentary Feature Charles H. Ferguson and Audrey Marrs Won
Chicago Film Critics Association Awards[6] December 20, 2010 Best Documentary Feature Nominated
Gotham Independent Film Awards[7] November 29, 2010 Best Documentary Nominated
Las Vegas Film Critics Society Awards[8] December 16, 2010 Best Documentary Film Nominated
Online Film Critics Society Awards[9] January 3, 2011 Best Documentary Nominated
Phoenix Film Critics Society Awards[10] December 28, 2010 Best Documentary Feature Nominated
Writers Guild of America Awards[11] February 5, 2011 Best Documentary Screenplay Won
Directors Guild of America Awards[12] December 29, 2010 Best Documentary Nominated

Notes

  1. ^ "Inside Job Movie Reviews, Pictures". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved January 26, 2011. 
  2. ^ Hill, Logan (May 16, 2010). "Is Matt Damon's Narration of a Cannes Doc a Sign that Hollywood is Abandoning Obama?". [[New York (magazine)|]]. Retrieved May 16, 2010. 
  3. ^ Dargis, Manohla (May 16, 2010). "At Cannes, the Economy Is On-Screen". Retrieved May 17, 2010.  Text "publisherThe New York Times " ignored (help)
  4. ^ Maley, Dennis (November 16, 2010). "Inside Job is a Masterful Look at What Happened in Financial Collapse". The Bradenton Times. Retrieved January 26, 2011. 
  5. ^ "Nominees for the 83rd Academy Awards". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved January 26, 2011. 
  6. ^ "Chicago Film Critics Awards - 2008-2010". Chicago Film Critics Association. Retrieved January 26, 2010. 
  7. ^ Adams, Ryan (October 18, 2010). "2010 Gotham Independent Film Award Nominations". awardsdaily.com. Retrieved January 26, 2011. 
    Adams, Ryan (November 29, 2010). "20th Anniversary Gotham Independent Award winners". awardsdaily.com. Retrieved January 26, 2011. 
  8. ^ Adams, Ryan (December 16, 2010). "The Las Vegas Film Critics Society Awards". awardsdaily.com. Retrieved January 26, 2011. 
  9. ^ Stone, Sarah (December 27, 2010). "Online Film Critics Society Nominations". awardsdaily.com. Retrieved January 26, 2011. 
    Stone, Sarah (January 3, 2011). "The Social Network Named Best Film by the Online Film Critics". awardsdaily.com. Retrieved January 26, 2011. 
  10. ^ "Phoenix Film Critics Name THE KINGS SPEECH Best Film of 2010". Phoenix Film Critics Society. Retrieved January 26, 2011. 
  11. ^ "Writer's Guild of America 2011 Nominations". Writers Guild of America. Retrieved February 6, 2011. 
  12. ^ "DGA 2011 Award Winners Announced". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved January 29, 2011. 

External links