Insight-oriented psychotherapy

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Insight-oriented psychotherapy relies on conversation between the therapist and the client.[1] It helps people through understanding and expressing feelings, motivations, beliefs, fears and desires.[2] Insight-oriented psychotherapy is a long process, wherein the client must spend multiple days per week with the therapist.[3] As insight-oriented psychotherapy is a client-centered therapy, it is assumed that the client is healthy and their problem is a result of faulty-thinking.[4][5]

Overview[edit]

Certain forms of insight-oriented psychotherapy are psychoanalysis and gestalt therapy.[6] A downfall of insight-oriented psychotherapy would be the narrow range of people who could benefit from the therapy.[7] During the therapy, the patient talks about what is on their mind and the therapist looks for patterns in situations in which the patient might feel stress or anxiety.[8] Patients typically wish to explore their anxiety more deeply because of a belief that deeper exploration will lead to change.[9]

History[edit]

The oldest form of insight-oriented psychotherapy was developed by Freud and is known as psychoanalysis.[10]

Psychedelic therapy[edit]

Some evidence suggests that the process of insight-oriented psychotherapy can be improved by the use of drugs, which can be described as psychedelic drugs (meaning "mind-manifesting").[11] Psychedelic substances, such as the amphetamine MDMA, can be used in psychotherapy to reinforce and enhance the relationship between the healthcare professional and his or her client (or patient).[12] Such substances can be used to better manage abreaction and catharsis and improve the quality of understanding between the healthcare professional and patient.[13]

Numerous clinical papers on the effectiveness of psychedelics in Insight-Oriented drug therapy have been published.[14][15] These psychedelics were used to treat a wide variety of psychological issues, including "alcoholism, obsessional neurosis, and sociopathy".[16][17] Furthermore, it was found that psychedelics were effective in easeing the process of dying patients.[18] A major reason for the clinical interest in psychedelic drugs for psychoanalysis was the belief of some experimental subjects that the experience of using psychedelic medication reduced their feelings of guilt and made them less depressed and anxious and more self-accepting, tolerant, and alert.[19] Eliciting the release of these feelings through ego death can make the transition to acceptance of the patients situation much easier, thus causing the seeming acceptance or healing that comes with a combination of intensive sessions and varying psychedelics (based on their condition). This sense of comfort and release of confounding factors have been found to cause nominal increases in patients ability to rationally handle their situations.[citation needed]

Effectiveness[edit]

The length of treatment depends on the needs and circumstances of the patient. A time limit may be set to work towards achieving one goal or if more sessions are needed, community therapist may be advised. It can be effective for: mood disorders, anxiety disorders, substance abuse disorders, eating disorders, sexual dysfunctions, adjustment disorders, personality disorders and relational, family or academic problems.[20]

However, the popular treatment methods used can also generate placebo insights within clients. Because patients face a lot of epistemic pressure in the therapeutic encounter, they may experience insights such as illusions, deception, or adaptive self-misunderstandings—and it can also generate therapeutic artefacts that seem to confirm these insights.[21]

Issues[edit]

Different treatment options based on other assumptions about certain ameliorative factors in psychotherapy have been affected by this trend towards shorter treatment procedures. Insight-oriented therapies have generally consisted of treatment approaches that share the premise that behavior is disturbed in some manner through a lack of subject awareness.

These approaches to treatment include client-centered psychotherapy which focuses upon special conditions in the therapeutic relationship; existential psychotherapy with its focus upon anxiety of death, as well as philosophical questions regarding the meaning of life; and, the revamp of an interpersonal psychotherapy strategy stemming from its original Sullivanian conception. Many problems have emerged in clinical treatment settings, in large part due to time limitations, as well as the restricted, minimal focus placed upon each of the above types of treatment.[22]

Insight-oriented psychotherapy is also used often and in conjunction with medication for treating depression. However, it is less suited for the afflicted individual who is especially emotional/sensitive, has little self-awareness, and is dealing with a major life problem.[23]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Carlson, Heth; et al. (2007). Psychology: The Science of Behavior. 
  2. ^ Insight-oriented Psychotherapy. (n.d.). University of Toronto: Counseling and Psychological Services. Retrieved March 21, 2013, from http://www.caps.utoronto.ca/Services-Offered/Individual-Psychotherapy/Insight-oriented-Psychotherapy.htm
  3. ^ Carlson, Heth; et al. (2007). Psychology: The Science of Behavior. 
  4. ^ Carlson, Heth; et al. (2007). Psychology: The Science of Behavior. 
  5. ^ Insight-oriented Psychotherapy. (n.d.). University of Toronto: Counseling and Psychological Services. Retrieved April 9, 2012, from http://caps.utoronto.ca/Services-Offered/Individual-Psychotherapy/Insight-oriented-Psychotherapy.htm
  6. ^ Carlson, Heth; et al. (2007). Psychology: The Science of Behavior. 
  7. ^ Carlson, Heth; et al. (2007). Psychology: The Science of Behavior. 
  8. ^ Insight-oriented Psychotherapy. (n.d.). University of Toronto: Counseling and Psychological Services. Retrieved April 9, 2012, from http://caps.utoronto.ca/Services-Offered/Individual-Psychotherapy/Insight-oriented-Psychotherapy.htm
  9. ^ Allan D. Peterkin and Michael Dworkind. Comparing Psychotherapies for Primary Care, Can Fam Physician, 1991 March
  10. ^ Carlson, Heth; et al. (2007). Psychology: The Science of Behavior. 
  11. ^ Grinspoon, L., & Doblin, R. (2001). Psychedelics as catalysts of insight-oriented psychotherapy. Social Research, 68(3), 677-695. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/209669088
  12. ^ Grinspoon, L., & Doblin, R. (2001). Psychedelics as catalysts of insight-oriented psychotherapy. Social Research, 68(3), 677-695. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/209669088
  13. ^ Grinspoon, L., & Doblin, R. (2001). Psychedelics as catalysts of insight-oriented psychotherapy. Social Research, 68(3), 677-695. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/209669088
  14. ^ Abramson, H. A., ed. (1967). The Use of LSD in Psychotherapy and Alcoholism
  15. ^ DeBold, R. C., and Russell C. Leaf, eds. (1967)LSD, Man, and Society.
  16. ^ Shagass, C., and R. M. Bittle. (1967) Therapeutic Effects of LSD: A Follow-up Study. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease 144: 471-78
  17. ^ Savage, C., D.Jackson, and J. Terrill.(1962) LSD, Transcendence, and the New Beginning. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease 135: 425-39
  18. ^ Grof, S., et al. (1973) LSD-assisted Psychotherapy in Patients with Terminal Cancer. International Pharmacopsychiatry 8: 129-41
  19. ^ Grinspoon, L., & Doblin, R. (2001). Psychedelics as catalysts of insight-oriented psychotherapy. Social Research, 68(3), 677-695. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/209669088
  20. ^ Insight-oriented Psychotherapy. (n.d.). University of Toronto: Counseling and Psychological Services. Retrieved March 21, 2013, from http://www.caps.utoronto.ca/Services-Offered/Individual-Psychotherapy/Insight-oriented-Psychotherapy.htm
  21. ^ Jopling, David A. (2001). "Placebo Insight: The Rationality of Insight-Oriented Psychotherapy". Journal of Clinical Psychology. 57 (1): 19–36. doi:10.1002/1097-4679(200101)57:1<19::AID-JCLP4>3.0.CO;2-Z. 
  22. ^ Scaturo, Douglas (September 2002). "Fundamental Dilemmas in Contemporary Psychodynamic and Insight-Oriented Psychotherapy". Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy. 32 (2): 145–165. doi:10.1023/A:1020540909172. Retrieved 10 November 2012. 
  23. ^ "Insight-oriented Psychotherapy". Sentiens Health. Retrieved 16 March 2013.