Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security (New Zealand)

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The Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security is the official responsible for supervising New Zealand's two main intelligence agencies: the Security Intelligence Service (SIS) and the Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB) .

Cheryl Gwyn is the present Inspector-General.[1][2][3] The position is chosen by the Prime Minister, after consultation with the Leader of the Opposition.

Traditionally the office has been very small, but it is in the process of expansion to include a Deputy Director, two advisors, and investigation staff. This expansion is to be accompanied by greater resourcing and a more intensive role.[citation needed]

Functions of the Inspector-General[edit]

The Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security (IGIS) is a statutory officer appointed under the Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security Act 1996.[4] It replaced an earlier Commissioner for Security Appeals, a position created in 1969.

The IGIS assists the Minister responsible for NZSIS and GCSB, usually the Prime Minister, to ensure the activities of each agency comply with the law; ensure that complaints relating to these agencies are independently investigated;[5] and review those bodies' compliance procedures and systems.[6] Neither the National Assessments Bureau nor the Directorate of Defence Intelligence and Security are under the oversight of the role.[7]

The Inspector-General does not have a management role in the NZSIS or GCSB and cannot order them to take, or to cease, any activity - the role is limited to reporting concerns and findings to the Minister,[8] who ultimately is responsible for corrective action.

The Inspector-General conducts inquiries into matters of concern, including individual complaints, report findings and recommendations to the Minister. Those reports, excluding matters of security concern, may be found on the Inspector-General's website.[9] The Inspector-General also makes a report each year to the Minister. A copy of that report, excluding material of security concern or which may cause danger is presented to Parliament. A copy, without deletions, must be given to the Leader of the Opposition.[10]

Details on how to make a complaint to the Inspector-General can be found under the Complaints section of the website.[11]

List of Inspectors-General[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Inspector General Intelligence and Security appointed". Beehive. 2014-04-23. Retrieved 2014-05-16. 
  2. ^ "The trailblazing women who guard our security", 08 MAY 2015, ADLSI
  3. ^ "The curious career of Cheryl Gwyn..." Tom Peters and John Braddock, 15 August 2015, World Socialist Web Site
  4. ^ "Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security Act 1996" (PDF). New Zealand Government. Retrieved 2014-05-16. 
  5. ^ "The Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security website". New Zealand Government. Retrieved 2014-05-16. 
  6. ^ "Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security Act 1996" (PDF). New Zealand Government. Retrieved 2014-05-16. 
  7. ^ Section 2(1), Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security Act 1996.
  8. ^ "Cheryl Gwyn slams the SIS", 4 Nov 2015, 3news.co.nz
  9. ^ "Publications". Retrieved 2014-05-16. 
  10. ^ "Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security Act 1996" (PDF). New Zealand Government. Retrieved 2014-05-16. 
  11. ^ "Complaints". Retrieved 2014-05-16. 
  12. ^ Audrey Young (2013-07-02). "Spy watchdog switch ahead of hearings". New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 2013-09-27. 
  13. ^ "Inspector General Intelligence and Security appointed". Beehive. 2014-04-23. Retrieved 2014-05-16. 

External links[edit]