Institut Mines-Télécom

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IMT - Institut Mines-Télécom
IMT logo 2017.png
TypePublic, Grand établissement EPSCP
Established1996
ChancellorOdile Gauthier
PresidentOlivier Huart
Administrative staff
4,450
Students12,300[1]
Postgraduates1,560
Location,
48°42′46″N 2°12′01″E / 48.7128°N 2.2003°E / 48.7128; 2.2003Coordinates: 48°42′46″N 2°12′01″E / 48.7128°N 2.2003°E / 48.7128; 2.2003
Websitehttp://www.imt.fr/en/
Institut Mines-Télécom is located in France
Paris
Paris
Alès
Alès
Albi
Albi
Brest
Brest
Douai
Douai
Évry
Évry
Lille
Lille
Nancy
Nancy
Nantes
Nantes
Saint-Étienne
Saint-Étienne
Saint-Étienne
Saint-Étienne
Sophia Antipolis
Sophia Antipolis
IMT Mines campuses

Institut Mines-Télécom (IMT) is a French public academic institution dedicated to Higher Education and Research for Innovation in the fields of engineering and digital technology, organized as a Collegiate University. Created in 1996, it was originally known as the "Groupe des écoles des télécommunications", or GET, followed by the "Institut Télécom". The Mines schools, which were placed under the administrative supervision of the Ministry of Industry, joined the Institut in March 2012 when it took on its current name and gained the status of Grand établissement. It combines high academic and scientific legitimacy with a practical proximity to business and a unique positioning in 3 major transformations of the 21st century: Digital Affairs, Energy and Ecology, and Industry. Its training and research for innovation are rolled out in the Mines and Télécom Graduate Schools. The Institut falls under the administrative aegis of the General Council for the Economy, Industry, Energy and Technologies.

Institut Mines-Télécom is a founding member of the Industry of the Future Alliance and the University of Paris-Saclay.[2] It maintains close relationships with the economic world and has two Carnot Institutes.

Every year around one hundred startup companies leave its incubators.

The schools (Grandes Écoles) are accredited by the Commission des Titres d'Ingénieur (CTI) to deliver the French Diplôme d'Ingénieur.

History[edit]

In 1996, the France Télécom monopoly in telecommunications ended. The group of telecommunications schools was established in the form of an Établissement public à caractère administratif (public establishment of an administrative nature), for the purpose of managing the three schools: the École nationale supérieure des télécommunications; the École nationale supérieure des télécommunications de Bretagne and the Institut national des télécommunications. The group was renamed the "Institut Télécom" in 2008. On 1 March 2012, it was renamed the "Institut Mines-Télécom" and converted to an EPCSCP - Grand Établissement. The six Mines schools under the supervision of the Ministry for the Economy, Finances and Industry joined the Institut by convention.

Schools[edit]

All Institut Mines-Telecom (IMT) schools are Grandes Écoles, a French institution of higher education that is separate from, but parallel and connected to the main framework of the French public university system. Similar to the Ivy League in the United States, Oxbridge in the UK, and C9 League in China, Grandes Écoles are elite academic institutions that admit students through an extremely competitive process.[3][4][5] Alumni go on to occupy elite positions within government, administration, and corporate firms in France.[6][7]

International students often may apply directly to a Grande École after obtaining a high school or bachelors degree, but most French students apply through the Grande École program (CPGE). Unlike the public universities in which all students may enroll directly after receiving a high school diploma (baccalauréat), many French CPGE applicants, including those applying to IMT schools, must first pass a highly competitive national exam. French students can take the exam after receiving their baccalauréat, but many will first attend a two-year prépa (Classe préparatoire aux grandes écoles) and obtain 120 ECTs. Students not accepted at the Grande École of their choice will often repeat the second year of prépa and re-take the exam. Once admitted, the CPGE requires 5 years of post-baccalauréat training (Bac + 5) and ends with a Master's degree. Students accepted to a CPGE after finishing a two-year prépa will start in year 3 of the program. In 2022, annual tuition for a masters in general engineering degree was: €2,150 for European Union citizens; €4,150 for all others.[8]

Although the IMT schools are selective and can be more expensive than public universities in France, Grandes Écoles typically have much smaller class sizes and student bodies, and many of their programs are taught in English. International internships, study abroad opportunities, and close ties with government and the corporate world are a hallmark of the Grandes Écoles. Many of the top ranked schools in Europe are members of the Conférence des Grandes Écoles (CGE), as are the IMT schools.[9][10] Degrees from the Institut Mines-Telecom are accredited by the Conférence des Grandes Écoles[11] and awarded by the Ministry of National Education (France) (French: Le Ministère de L'éducation Nationale).[12]

Institut Mines-Télécom is composed of eight schools (Grandes Écoles):

Strategic partners[edit]

Institut Mines-Télécom maintains close relations with strategic partners:

Subsidiaries[edit]

Associate schools[edit]

Institut Mines-Télécom also includes eleven associate schools:

Position in the higher education context in France[edit]

Institut Mines-Télécom is a member of several PRES

The Institut is also a member of the Plateau de Saclay Scientific Cooperation Foundation.

Mobility agreement between schools[edit]

A mobility agreement enables students of Institut Mines-Télécom schools to complete their 3rd year of study at a different school within the Institut Mines-Télécom. The agreement involves the 10 schools of the Institut Mines-Télécom, its 2 affiliate schools, Eurecom and Télécom Lille 1, and its strategic partner, Mines Nancy. Students have access to the options and subjects available at each school.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The number-one group of engineering..." IMT Mines-Telecom. Retrieved 7 February 2022.
  2. ^ "Members and associates". Archived from the original on 2016-10-18. Retrieved 2017-01-07.
  3. ^ "France's educational elite". Daily Telegraph. 17 November 2003. Retrieved 5 February 2019.
  4. ^ Pierre Bourdieu (1998). The State Nobility: Elite Schools in the Field of Power. Stanford UP. pp. 133–35. ISBN 9780804733465.
  5. ^ What are Grandes Ecoles Institutes in France?
  6. ^ Monique de Saint-Martin, « Les recherches sociologiques sur les grandes écoles : de la reproduction à la recherche de justice », Éducation et sociétés 1/2008 (No. 21), p. 95-103. lire en ligne sur Cairn.info
  7. ^ Valérie Albouy et Thomas Wanecq, Les inégalités sociales d’accès aux grandes écoles (2003), INSEE
  8. ^ "General engineering". IMT Mines. Retrieved 7 February 2022.
  9. ^ "Listings Archive". Conférence des Grandes Écoles. Retrieved 29 January 2022.
  10. ^ "Higher Education in France". BSB. Retrieved 26 January 2022.
  11. ^ "Conférence des grandes écoles: commission Accréditation". Conférence des grandes écoles. Retrieved 21 January 2022.
  12. ^ "Etablissements dispensant des formations supérieures initiales diplômantes conférant le grade de master". Ministry of France, Higher Education. Ministère de l'Enseignement supérieur, de la Recherche et de l'Innovation. Retrieved 16 January 2022.

External links[edit]