Institute for American Values

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The Institute for American Values is a New York City think tank focusing on family and social issues.[1][2][3]

The Institute’s mission is “to study and strengthen civil society.” Within the focus on civil society, the institute’s current priorities are marriage, thrift, and public conversation.

Overview[edit]

Its president is David Blankenhorn.[4][5] It has influenced both liberal and conservative politicians.[2] It has been critical of divorce and out-of-wedlock childbirth.[6] It supports fathers' rights.[7] It helped shape the family ideology of the Clinton administration.[8] The organization, as a whole, seems to take a moderate position on gay rights issues, although Blankenhorn signed a petition in 2014 called "Freedom to Marry, Freedom to Dissent".[9] It interpreted the September 11 attacks as an attack on American values.[10] It has been supported by Philip Anschutz.[11]

Publications[edit]

  • Marriage in America: A Report to the Nation (1995)
  • The Marriage Movement: A Statement of Principles (2000)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chuck Stetson, Creating the Better Hour: Lessons from William Wilberforce, Stroud & Hall Publishers, 2007, p. 271 [1]
  2. ^ a b Don S. Browning, Marriage and modernization: how globalization threatens marriage and what to do about it, Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 2003, p. 189 [2]
  3. ^ Institute for American Values mission
  4. ^ Mark Oppenheimer, "In Shift, David Blankenhorn Enlists Same-Sex Couples in a Pro-Marriage Coalition," New York Times, January 29, 2013 [3]
  5. ^ Gill Jagger, Caroline Wright, Changing family values, Routledge, 1999, p. 186 [4]
  6. ^ Michael B. Katz, Mark J. Stern, One Nation Divisible: What America Was and What It Is Becoming, Russell Sage Foundation, 2008, p. 199 [5]
  7. ^ Peter G. Jaffe, Protecting children from domestic violence: strategies for community intervention, Guilford Press, 2004, p. 125 [6]
  8. ^ Roger N. Lancaster, Micaela Di Leonardo, The gender/sexuality reader: culture, history, political economy, Routledge, 1997, p. 454 [7]
  9. ^ http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2014/04/22/freedom_to_marry_freedom_to_dissent_why_we_must_have_both_122376.html
  10. ^ Jan Hancock, Human rights and US foreign policy, Routledge, 2007, p. 88 [8]
  11. ^ Randy Krehbiel, 'Colorado billionaire Philip Anschutz buys The Oklahoman, OPUBCO', in Tulsa World, 9/16/2011 [9]

External links[edit]