Civil conflict in the Philippines

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Civil conflict in the Philippines
Part of the Cold War and
the Global War on Terrorism
Communist hotspots in the Philippines.pngPhilippines Christian-Muslim Division Map (by majority).png
Date March 29, 1969 – present
Location Philippines
Status Ongoing
Belligerents

 Philippines
Supported by:
 Australia[1]
 Indonesia
 Malaysia
 United States[2]



Civilian militias

  • Red God Defenders[4][5](against BIFF)

Communists:
Communist Party


Moro people:
MNLF
MILF
Sulu Sultanate

Supported by:

 Malaysia (to MNLF and MILF)[6][7]
 People's Republic of China (1969–1976,[8] alleged continued support[citation needed]) (to NPA, NDF and the Makabayan)
 Libyan Arab Jamahiriya (1980s–2011)[9][10](to MNLF, NPA, NDF and the Makabayan)[11][12][13][14][15]
 North Korea (to NPA, NDF and the Makabayan)[16][17]
 Vietnam (1980s) (to NPA, NDF and the Makabayan)[12]
 Cuba (Alleged support[citation needed])(to NPA, NDF and the Makabayan)
 Kazakhstan (to NPA, NDF and the Makabayan)

Islamists:
RSM
JI
BIFF


 Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant

The Civil conflict in the Philippines is an ongoing civil war in the modern history of the Philippines:[20][21][22][23]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Philippines to be a Key Recipient of Australia's New Regional Counter-Terrorism Package
  2. ^ Trainers, Advisors Help Philippines Fight Terrorism
  3. ^ Cite error: The named reference peace was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  4. ^ Maitem, Jeoffrey (19 January 2016). [newsinfo.inquirer.net/756916/armed-christian-civilians-vow-to-fight-biff-atrocities "Armed Christian civilians vow to fight BIFF atrocities"] Check |url= value (help). Inquirer Mindanao. Retrieved 20 January 2016. 
  5. ^ Maitem, Jeoffrey (20 January 2016). "IN PHOTOS: Red God Defenders". Rappler. Retrieved 20 January 2016. 
  6. ^ Tan, Andrew T/H. (2009). A Handbook of Terrorism and Insurgency in Southeast Asia. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing. pp. 230, 238. ISBN 1847207189. 
  7. ^ Isak Svensson (27 November 2014). International Mediation Bias and Peacemaking: Taking Sides in Civil Wars. Routledge. pp. 69–. ISBN 978-1-135-10544-0. 
  8. ^ "Philippines (New Peoples Army) (1972– )" (PDF). Political Economy Research Institute. Retrieved 14 December 2014. 
  9. ^ "Libyan terrorism: the case against Gaddafi.". thefreelibrary.com. 
  10. ^ "WikiLeaks cable: Gaddafi funded, trained CPP-NPA rebels". Wikileaks. 9 July 2011. Retrieved 15 February 2015. 
  11. ^ "Khadafy admits aiding Muslim seccesionists". Philippine Daily Inquirer. 5 August 1986. p. 2. 
  12. ^ a b Paul J. Smith (21 September 2004). Terrorism and Violence in Southeast Asia: Transnational Challenges to States and Regional Stability. M.E. Sharpe. pp. 194–. ISBN 978-0-7656-3626-3. 
  13. ^ William Larousse (1 January 2001). A Local Church Living for Dialogue: Muslim-Christian Relations in Mindanao-Sulu, Philippines : 1965-2000. Gregorian Biblical BookShop. pp. 151 & 162. ISBN 978-88-7652-879-8. 
  14. ^ Michelle Ann Miller (2012). Autonomy and Armed Separatism in South and Southeast Asia. Institute of Southeast Asian Studies. pp. 291–. ISBN 978-981-4379-97-7. 
  15. ^ "Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF)". Página acessada em 10 de fevereiro de 2014.
  16. ^ "World Tribune.com-Front Page: Report: North Korea armed Islamic group in Philippines". Página acessada em 10 de fevereiro de 2014.
  17. ^ "1990 Global Terrorism: State-Sponsored Terrorism". fas.org. 
  18. ^ http://www.rappler.com/nation/65199-abu-sayyaf-leader-oath-isis
  19. ^ "ISIS Now Has Military Allies in 11 Countries -- NYMag". Daily Intelligencer. Retrieved 25 November 2014. 
  20. ^ Guide to the Philippines conflict. BBC. October 8, 2012.
  21. ^ "The Fruit of Misuari's Capitulation", Bulatlat. Quezon City, Philippines. December 2–8, 2001.
  22. ^ Philippines. Uppsala Conflict Data Program. "...the Philippines has experienced the intra-state, non-state and one-sided categories of UCDP organised violence."
  23. ^ Comparative Politics: The politics of Asia - Google Books