Intair

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Intair was a Canada-based airline that operated between 1989 and 1991.

Intair
Intair
IATA ICAO Callsign
ND INT Intair
Founded 1989
Ceased operations 1991
Hubs Montreal, Quebec City Sept-Iles, Quebec
Focus cities Toronto
Fleet size 14+
Destinations See destination listing
Parent company Air Atonabee Ltd.
Headquarters Mississauga, Ontario (1989-1991)
Key people Michel Leblanc(until 1991 february.Since 1991 march Steven Stansfrred)

History[edit]

Intair operated passenger jet service between Toronto[1] and Montreal[2] with Fokker 100 aircraft as well as scheduled jet and turboprop passenger service to other destinations in eastern Canada and also charter flights between Canada and such vacation destinations as Orlando and Ft.Lauderdale in Florida. According to the Official Airline Guide (OAG), in late 1989 Intair was operating up to twelve nonstop flights a day between Montreal Dorval Airport (YUL) and Toronto Pearson Airport (YYZ) primarily with the Fokker 100 twin jet and was also operating F100 jet service nonstop between Montreal and Quebec City, Rouyn-Noranda, Saguenay and Val-d'Or in Quebec province, and nonstop between Montreal and Moncton in New Brunswick province as well.[3]

The airline began operations after Nordair was purchased by Canadian Pacific Airlines. Intair used Nordair's IATA two letter "ND" airline code. The airline was established in 1989 by City Express as a successor to Skycraft Air Transport[citation needed]. It served many destinations in Quebec province formerly served by Quebecair and also flew to destinations in New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Ontario provinces of Canada.

Fleet[edit]

[2][4]

Destinations in 1990[edit]

According to a 1990 Intair route map brochure, the airline was serving the following destinations in these Canadian provinces:[5]

New Brunswick

  • Charlo
  • Chatham
  • Moncton

Newfoundland and Labrador

  • Wabush/Labrador City

Ontario

Quebec

  • Alma
  • Baie-Comeau
  • Baie-Johan-Beetz
  • Blanc-Sablon
  • Bonaventure
  • Chibougamau
  • Dolbeau
  • Gaspe
  • Gatineau/Hull
  • Gethsemanie/La Romaine
  • Harrington Harbour/Chevery
  • Havre-St.-Pierre
  • Iles-de-la-Madeleine
  • Kegaska
  • La Grande
  • La Tabatiere
  • Montreal - Dorval Airport (now Montreal-Pierre Elliot Trudeau International Airport) - Hub
  • Montreal - Mirabel Airport
  • Montreal/St.-Hubert
  • Natashquan
  • Port Menier
  • Quebec City - Hub
  • Roberval
  • Rimouski/Mont-Joli
  • Rouyn/Noranda
  • Saguenay
  • Schefferville/Bagotville
  • St.-Augustin
  • Sept-Iles - Secondary hub
  • Tete-a-La-Baleine
  • Val-d'Or

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Photos: Fokker 100 (F-28-0100) Aircraft Pictures". Airliners.net. 1990-06-02. Retrieved 2011-09-20. 
  2. ^ a b "Photos: Swearingen SA-226TC Metro II Aircraft Pictures". Airliners.net. 1990-04-29. Retrieved 2011-09-20. 
  3. ^ http://www.departedflights.com, Dec. 15, 1989 Official Airline Guide (OAG), Montreal Dorval Airport flight schedules
  4. ^ "Intair - Details and Fleet History - Planespotters.net Just Aviation". Planespotters.net. Retrieved 2011-09-20. 
  5. ^ http://www.timetableimages.com, 1990 Intair route map brochure

External links[edit]

  • [1] at Planespotters.net