Intel International Science and Engineering Fair

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The Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (Intel ISEF) is an annual science fair,[1] and is owned and administered by the Society for Science & the Public[2] a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization based in Washington, DC.[3] Each May, more than 1500 students from roughly 70 countries and territories compete in the fair for scholarships, tuition grants, internships, scientific field trips and the grand prizes, including one $75,000 and two $50,000 college scholarships. All prizes together amount to over $4,070,000.[4] Two awards ceremonies are held including: Special Awards Organization Presentation (which now includes the Government Awards Presentations) and the Grand Awards Ceremony. The International Science and Engineering Fair was founded in 1950 by Science Service (now the Society for Science & the Public) and has been sponsored by the Intel Corporation since 1997.[5] Starting from 2019, the Intel Corporation will no longer be the title sponsor for ISEF.[6]

ISEF alumni including Nobel Prize winner Paul Modrich (1964), and National Medal of Science winners Richard Zare (1957), Susan Solomon (1972), and James Gunn (1957).[7] Other alumni include inventor Alex Deans (2013),[8] SUNY Chancellor Kristina M. Johnson (1975),[9] CRISPR researcher Feng Zhang,[10] and Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (2007).[11]

Contestants and competition[edit]

Contestants are selected from regional, district, and state ISEF affiliated fairs. These fairs usually encompass multiple states or entire regions of a country. The regional fair committee is responsible for managing the fair when their city hosts the event.

Individual science projects and team science projects both compete for prizes. Teams are composed of two to as many as four high school students (grades 9-12).

The structure of the competition is as follows:

  • Sunday: Arrival, project setup, fixing Display and Safety violations, and pin exchange
  • Monday: Continual arrival and setup, opening ceremony
  • Tuesday: Final project clearance
  • Wednesday: Awards judging over 3 sessions, with both scheduled and unscheduled interviews
  • Thursday: Public visitation day, special awards ceremony
  • Friday: Grand awards ceremony, project teardown

Additionally, time is set aside for students to experience the host city, with ISEF coordinating signups for various tours and activities. A significant component of the program is social, as students interact with each other during mixers and ceremonies. Throughout much of the week, various seminars are also held for students, mentors, and teachers.

Prizes and honors[edit]

ISEF 2011 Finalist Medal
  • Gordon E. Moore Award: $75,000 scholarship, given to the top of the Best of Category Award winners, selected on the basis of innovative research and potential of the project to have an impact in the particular field and the world as a whole.
  • Intel Foundation Young Scientist Award: $ 50,000 award presented by Intel and SSP to two Best in Category projects. Previous winners include Henry Lin and Eesha Khare.
  • Dudley R. Herschbach SIYSS Award: all expense trip paid trip to the Stockholm International Youth Science Seminar, and attendance to the Nobel Prize ceremonies.
  • European Union Contest for Young Scientists: All expense paid trip to European Union Contest.
  • Intel Best of Category Awards: Category winners are awarded a $5,000 scholarship; their school and the fair they represent are awarded a $1,000 grant.[12]
  • The Intel ISEF Finalist Medal is given to about 1800 student participants at the fair each year.
  • Intel International Excellence in Teaching Award is also given during the Intel ISEF since 1997. A prominent awardee was Josette Biyo.[13]

ISEF also used to hold a "People's Choice Award" to allow the public to vote for its favorite entries.[14]

Since 2001, MIT's Lincoln Laboratory has named asteroids after ISEF winners as part of the Ceres Connection.

Top Prize Winners[edit]

When Intel began sponsoring ISEF in 1997, the Grand Awards were replaced with the Intel Foundation Young Scientist Awards, awarded to the top three projects.[5] In 2010, the top award was renamed for Intel co-founder Gordon E. Moore.[15]

ISEF 1997 (Louisville, Kentucky) Intel Foundation Young Scientist Awards[16]
  • Scott Nicholas Sanders (Coral Springs, FL)
  • Logan Joseph Kleinwaks (Reston, VA)
  • Karen Mendelson (Worcester, MA)
ISEF 1998 (Fort Worth, Texas) Intel Foundation Young Scientist Awards[16]
  • James Warner Lawler (Greenwich, CT)
  • Jonathan Adam Kelner (Old Westbury, NY)
  • Geoffrey Robert Schmidt (Little Rock, AR)
ISEF 1999 (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) Intel Foundation Young Scientist Awards[16]
  • Jennifer Lynn Pelka (Orlando, FL)
  • Nisha Nagarkatti (Blacksburg, VA)
  • Feng Zhang (Des Moines, IA)
ISEF 2000 (Detroit, Michigan) Intel Foundation Young Scientist Awards[16]
  • Nazanin Jouei (Coral Springs, FL)
  • Karen Kay Powell (Fort Pierce, FL)
  • Jason L. Douglas (Milford, OH)
ISEF 2001 (San Jose, California) Intel Foundation Young Scientist Awards[16][17]
  • Ryan Randall Patterson (Grand Junction, CO)
  • Monika Paroder (Brooklyn, NY)
  • Francis Boulva (Town of Mount-Royal, Canada)
ISEF 2002 (Louisville, Kentucky) Intel Foundation Young Scientist Awards[16][18]
  • Naveen Neil Sinha (Los Alamos, NM)
  • Alexander C. Mittal (Cos Cob, CT)
  • Nina Vasan (Vienna, WV)
ISEF 2003 (Cleveland, Ohio) Intel Foundation Young Scientist Awards[16][19]
  • Lisa Doreen Glukhovsky (New Milford, CT)
  • Elena Leah Glassman (Pipersville, PA)
  • Anila Madiraju (Brossard, Canada)
ISEF 2004 (Portland, Oregon) Intel Foundation Young Scientist Awards[16][20]
  • Sarah Rose Langberg (Fort Myers, FL)
  • Uwe Treske (Grafenhainichen, Germany)
  • Yuanchen Zhu (Shanghai, China)
ISEF 2005 (Phoenix, Arizona) Intel Foundation Young Scientist Awards[16][21]
  • Gabrielle Alyce Gianelli (Orlando, FL)
  • Stephen Schulz (Gelsenkirchen, Germany)
  • Ameen Abdulrasool (Chicago, IL)
ISEF 2006 (Indianapolis, Indiana) Intel Foundation Young Scientist Awards[16][22]
  • Hannah Louise Wolf (Allentown, PA)
  • Madhavi Pulakat Gavini (Starkville, MS)
  • Meredith Ann MacGregor (Boulder, CO)
ISEF 2007 (Albuquerque, New Mexico) Intel Foundation Young Scientist Awards[23]
  • Dayan Li (Greenbelt, Maryland)
  • Philip Vidal Streich (Platteville, Wisconsin)
  • Dmitry Vaintrob (Eugene, Oregon)
ISEF 2008 (Atlanta, Georgia) Intel Foundation Young Scientist Awards[24]
  • Sana Raoof (Muttontown, NY)
  • Natalie Saranga Omattage (Cleveland, MS)
  • Yi-Han Su (Taipei, Taiwan)
ISEF 2009 (Reno, Nevada) Intel Foundation Young Scientist Awards[25]
  • Tara Adiseshan (Charlottesville, VA)
  • Li Boynton, (Houston, TX)
  • Olivia Schwob (Boston, MA)
ISEF 2010 (San Jose, California)[26]
  • Gordon E. Moore Award: Amy Chyao (Richardson, TX)
  • Young Scientist Award: Kevin Ellis (Vancouver, WA)
  • Young Scientist Award: Yale Fan (Beaverton, OR)
ISEF 2011 (Los Angeles, California)[27]
  • Gordon E. Moore Award: Matthew Feddersen and Blake Marggraff (Lafayette, CA)
  • Young Scientist Award: Pornwasu Pongtheerawan, Arada Sungkanit and Tanpitcha Phongchaipaiboon (Suratthani, Thailand)
  • Young Scientist Award: Taylor Wilson (Reno, NV)
ISEF 2012 (Los Angeles, California)[28]
  • Gordon E. Moore Award: Jack Thomas Andraka (Glen Burnie, MD)
  • Young Scientist Award: Nicholas Benjamin Schiefer (Ontario, Canada)
  • Young Scientist Award: Ari Misha Dyckovsky (Sterling, VA)
ISEF 2013 (Phoenix, Arizona)[29]
  • Gordon E. Moore Award: Ionut Budistineau (Ramnicu Valcea, Romania)
  • Young Scientist Award: Eesha Khare (Saratoga, California)
  • Young Scientist Award: Henry Lin (Shreveport, Louisiana)
ISEF 2014 (Los Angeles, California)[30]
  • Gordon E. Moore Award: Nathan Han (Boston, MA)
  • Young Scientist Award: Lennart Kleinwort (Wurzburg, Germany)
  • Young Scientist Award: Shannon Winjing Lee (Singapore)
ISEF 2015 (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania)[31]
  • Gordon E. Moore Award: Raymond Wang (Vancouver, Canada)
  • Young Scientist Award: Nicole Ticea (Vancouver, Canada)
  • Young Scientist Award: Karan Jerath (Friendswood, Texas)
ISEF 2016 (Phoenix, Arizona)[32]
  • Gordon E. Moore Award: Han Jie (Austin) Wang (Vancouver, Canada)
  • Young Scientist Award: Syamantak Payra (Friendswood, Texas)
  • Young Scientist Award: Kathy Liu (Salt Lake City, Utah)
ISEF 2017 (Los Angeles, California)[33]
  • Gordon E. Moore Award: Ivo Zell (Hessen, Germany)
  • Young Scientist Award: Valerio Pagliarino (Castelnuovo Calcea, Italy)
  • Young Scientist Award: Amber Yang (Windermere, Florida)
ISEF 2018 (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania)[34]
  • Gordon E. Moore Award: Oliver Nicholls (Sydney, Australia)
  • Young Scientist Award: Meghana Bollimpalli (Little Rock, Arkansas)
  • Young Scientist Award: Dhruvik Parikh (Bothell, Washington)

Future ISEF locations[edit]

Locations for fairs through 2020 have been decided:[35]

Criticism[edit]

A major problem in the event has been students whose parents are professors using their parents' work as their own.

See also[edit]

The Regeneron Science Talent Search is a related but separate science research competition for high school seniors that is administered by the Society for Science & the Public and was previously sponsored by Westinghouse and Intel.[36]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Intel International Science and Engineering Fair". Intel. Retrieved 18 May 2014.
  2. ^ "About". Society for Science and the Public. Retrieved 18 May 2014.
  3. ^ "Mission and History". Society for Science and the Public. Retrieved 18 May 2014.
  4. ^ "FAQ about the Intel ISEF". Society For Science & the Public. Retrieved 11 January 2019.
  5. ^ a b Bellinger, Robert (June 9, 1997). "Intel exec decries latest labor trend". Electronic Engineering Times (957). p. 130. Intel is taking an even longer view of the problem. "The number of people entering science and engineering is declining," said Yu, quoting surveys that show the number of EE degrees awarded annually slipping below 20,000 in recent years-or about 10,000 fewer than in the 1980s. "That's a problem for the whole high-technology industry," said Yu, who has a keen interest in educational issues. "We need to bring up the visibility of science and engineering." Television rarely portrays engineers as having exciting or interesting jobs. So Intel has stepped in and is sponsoring equipment-donation programs in college laboratories. And this year, the company became the key sponsor of the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF), recently held in Louisville, Ky.
  6. ^ Lohr, Steve (February 14, 2017). "Intel Drops Its Sponsorship of Science Fairs, Prompting an Identity Crisis". The New York Times.
  7. ^ "Society Alumni Honors". Society for Science & The Public. Retrieved 10 January 2019.
  8. ^ "Alex Deans". Windsor Public Library. Retrieved 10 January 2019.
  9. ^ "Conversations with Maya: Kristina Johnson". Society for Science & The Public. June 28, 2018.
  10. ^ "Feng Zhang becomes Society Board Member". Society for Science and the Public. September 28, 2017.
  11. ^ King, Georgia Frances (December 1, 2018). "Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez won a prestigious science-fair prize for research involving free radicals". Quartz.
  12. ^ Intel ISEF grand awards. (n.d.). Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://societyforscience.org/isef/grandawards
  13. ^ "Small planet named after Pinoy science teacher". Retrieved 24 April 2017.
  14. ^ "Intel ISEF People's Choice Awards". Intel ISEF. Retrieved July 12, 2009.
  15. ^ "Texas Teen Wins Top Honors at Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, World's Largest Pre-College Science Competition". Intel. May 14, 2010.
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Intel Foundation Young Scientist Awards". Science Service. Archived from the original on September 23, 2006.
  17. ^ "Intel International Science And Engineering Fair Awards $3 Million In Scholarships And Prizes To Young Scientists And Inventors From Around The World". Intel. May 11, 2001.
  18. ^ "Young Scientists From Around The World Receive Total Of $3 Million In Scholarships And Prizes". Intel. May 17, 2002.
  19. ^ "Young Scientists From Around The World Receive Total Of $3 Million In Scholarships And Prizes". Intel. May 16, 2003.
  20. ^ "Next Generation Of Brilliant Thinkers Awarded $3 Million In Scholarships And Prizes". Intel. May 14, 2004.
  21. ^ "Photos from Intel ISEF 2005". Intel. May 13, 2005.
  22. ^ "Top Young Scientists From Around The World Awarded $4 Million In Scholarships". Intel. May 12, 2006.
  23. ^ "Intel Announces Winners of World's Largest Science Fair". Intel. May 18, 2007.
  24. ^ "Intel Announces Winners of World's Largest Pre-College Science Fair". Intel. May 16, 2008.
  25. ^ "Three Young Women Win Top Honors at World's Largest Pre-College Science Competition". Intel. May 15, 2009.
  26. ^ "Texas Teen Wins Top Honors at Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, World's Largest Pre-College Science Competition". Intel. May 14, 2010.
  27. ^ "Intel ISEF 2011". Society for Science & the Public. May 13, 2011.
  28. ^ "Intel ISEF 2012". Society for Science & the Public. May 18, 2012.
  29. ^ "Intel ISEF 2013". Society for Science & the Public. May 17, 2013.
  30. ^ "Intel ISEF 2014". Society for Science & the Public. May 16, 2014.
  31. ^ "Intel ISEF 2015". Society for Science & the Public. May 15, 2015.
  32. ^ "Intel ISEF 2015". Society for Science & the Public. May 13, 2016.
  33. ^ "Intel ISEF 2017". Society for Science & the Public. May 19, 2017.
  34. ^ "Intel ISEF 2018". Society for Science & the Public. May 18, 2018.
  35. ^ https://student.societyforscience.org/intel-isef
  36. ^ "Intel Science Talent Search". Society for Science and the Public. Retrieved November 19, 2009.

External links[edit]