International Architecture Awards

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
International Architecture Awards
Awarded for Celebrating, recognizing, and highlighting the world’s foremost architectural solutions, buildings that celebrate and harmonize architecture as a high art while finding answers to the complicated problems of environment, social context, improving quality of life, and sustainability
First awarded 2006
Official website www.chi-athenaeum.org/intarch/

The International Architecture Awards are global awards for new architecture, landscape architecture, interiors and urban planning. The program was launched by the Chicago Athenaeum Museum of Architecture and Design in 2005 to honor and celebrate the most outstanding architecture designed and built or unbuilt throughout the world. The Awards Program is open to all international architecture offices and U.S. firms with projects outside the United States. (U.S. submissions are judged annually for the American Architecture Award). The awards are awarded annually at the end of September by the Chicago Athenaeum Museum of Architecture and Design, and Metropolitan Arts Press Ltd. In 2009 the awards were presented in partnership with The European Center for Architecture Art Design and Urban Studies.

The winning projects are selects by the international jury from several hundred international submissions from architectural practices around the world. All submitted projects are to be designed by architects in their respective countries of origin or abroad three years prior to the award year. For example the deadline for submissions for the 2010 International Architecture Awards is December 1, 2009 for buildings designed and/or built between 2007-2009.

The awarded projects form an exhibition "The City and the World" that have toured inside Europe and South America including The International Biennial of Architecture Buenos Aires and The Istanbul Design Biennial.[1][2]

Awarded projects[edit]

The number of awarded projects:

  • 2006 – 33 projects
  • 2007 – 57 projects
  • 2008 - 114 projects
  • 2009 - 97 projects
  • 2011 - 90 projects[3]
  • 2012 - 80 projects[4]
  • 2013 - 60 projects[5]
  • 2014 - 110 projects [6]
  • 2015 - 60 projects [7]
  • 2016 - 130 projects [8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]