International Boundary Marker No. 1, U.S. and Mexico

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International Boundary Marker No. 1, U.S. and Mexico
International Boundary Marker No. 1, U.S. and Mexico - Close-up wide-angle view from north-west.jpg
International Boundary Marker No. 1, U.S. and Mexico is located in New Mexico
International Boundary Marker No. 1, U.S. and Mexico
Nearest cityEl Paso, New Mexico
Coordinates31°47′02″N 106°31′47″W / 31.783889°N 106.529755°W / 31.783889; -106.529755 (International Boundary Marker No. 1, U.S. and Mexico)Coordinates: 31°47′02″N 106°31′47″W / 31.783889°N 106.529755°W / 31.783889; -106.529755 (International Boundary Marker No. 1, U.S. and Mexico)
Area0.1 acres (0.040 ha)
Built1855
Built byEmory-Salazar Commission
NRHP reference #74001195[1]
Added to NRHPSeptember 10, 1974

International Boundary Marker No. 1, U.S. and Mexico is a monument on the Mexico-U.S. border, on the west bank of the Rio Grande River near El Paso, Texas. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.[1]

Photo from northwest in 2012

The monument was placed there in 1855 by the Emory-Salazar Commission. It is a dressed cut stone monument 12 feet (3.7 m) tall, 5 by 5 feet (1.5 m × 1.5 m) at its base and 2.5 by 2.5 feet (0.76 m × 0.76 m) at its top. The monument was repaired in 1892 by the Barlow-Blanco Commission, repaired again by the International Boundary Commission. It was repainted in 1933 and in 1959, the latter time by the by the International Boundary & Water Commission. It was refurbished in 1966 by the International Boundary and Water Commission, which stripped its old plaster coating down to the original masonry monument, and re-faced with white marbleized concrete. A 9 by 9 metres (30 ft × 30 ft) concrete slab platform was added then, too.[2]

It has also been known as Western Land Boundary Marker No. 1, U.S. and Mexico.

It is located in Dona Ana County, New Mexico, west of El Paso off Interstate 10.


References[edit]

  1. ^ a b National Park Service (2013-11-02). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.
  2. ^ Morris H. Raney (1974). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination: International Boundary Marker No. 1, U.S. and Mexico / Western Land Boundary Marker No. 1, U.S. and Mexico". National Park Service. Retrieved February 6, 2019. With accompanying photo from 1973