International Coalition to Stop Crimes Against Humanity in North Korea

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

The International Coalition to Stop Crimes Against Humanity in North Korea (ICNK) was formed on September 8, 2011. It comprises Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch and the International Federation for Human Rights and has support from over 40 organizations worldwide.[1][2] North Korean human rights issues with which the ICNK deals include North Korea’s political prison camp system and the repatriation and punishment of North Korean refugees.[3]

Mission[edit]

As stated by ICNK:

ICNK was formed with the goal of establishing a UN Commission of Inquiry to investigate Crimes against Humanity in North Korea.[4][5] In order to achieve this, the ICNK worked to raise public understanding and awareness of the human rights situation in North Korea.[6][7][better source needed]

In 2013 the UN Human Rights Council did establish the Commission of Inquiry on Human Rights in the DPRK with resolution 22/13,[8] with a landmark report published in 2014.[9][10][11][12][13]

Activities[edit]

In January 2012 ICNK sent an open letter to Kim Jong-un.[14] In March 2012 ICNK submitted a petition to the United Nations Human Rights Council to employ its special procedures mechanism to help shut down the North Korean political prison camps.[15]

Participating Organizations[edit]

List of member organizations:[16]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Campaign for Investigation into North Korea's Crimes Against Humanity". Human Rights Watch. Archived from the original on 2011-10-05.
  2. ^ Rogers, Benedict (September 9, 2011). "Calling for Action on North Korean Crimes". Wall Street Journal. Archived from the original on March 17, 2018.
  3. ^ "North Korean Reality: NK Human Rights Issues". International Coalition to Stop Crimes against Humanity in North Korea. Archived from the original on December 8, 2013. Retrieved April 4, 2012.
  4. ^ Cumming-Bruce, Nick (Sep 17, 2013). "U.N. Panel Urges International Action on North Korean Human Rights Abuses". The New York Times. p. A6 (print edition Sep 18). Archived from the original on October 10, 2013. Retrieved August 20, 2015. The chief human rights official at the United Nations, Navi Pillay, called on Monday for an international inquiry into human rights offenses committed by the North Korean government over many decades.
    Ms. Pillay, the Geneva-based high commissioner for human rights, pointed to North Korea’s “elaborate network of political prison camps,” believed by human rights organizations to hold 200,000 prisoners. The camps not only punish people for peaceful activities, but also employ “torture and other forms of cruel and inhumane treatment, summary executions, rape, slave labor and forms of collective punishment that may amount to crimes against humanity,” she said.
    (...)
    “What we are trying to do is put human rights as a priority in the international debate on North Korea,” said Juliette de Rivero, Geneva director of Human Rights Watch, one of more than 40 organizations in the International Coalition to Stop Crimes Against Humanity in North Korea that are backing the inquiry. “Right now it’s nearly invisible.”
  5. ^ Rogers, Benedict (January 28, 2013). "North Korea in the Dark". The New York Times. p. (print edition on January 29, 2013, in The International Herald Tribune). Archived from the original on February 1, 2013. Retrieved Aug 20, 2015.
  6. ^ ICNK: Introduction Archived 2012-06-20 at the Wayback Machine.
  7. ^ Kvesic, Ivana (Sep 8, 2011). "Human Rights, Christian Groups Investigate North Korea's Crimes Against Humanity". Christian Post. Archived from the original on 2013-01-19.
  8. ^ Erlanger, Steven (March 21, 2013). "U.N. Panel to Investigate Human Rights Abuses in North Korea". The New York Times. Archived from the original on March 11, 2014. Retrieved August 20, 2015.
  9. ^ United Nations Human Rights Council Session 25 Report of the detailed findings of the commission of inquiry on human rights in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea A/HRC/25/CRP.1 7 February 2014.
  10. ^ United Nations Human Rights Council Session 25 Summary record Report of the commission of inquiry on human rights in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea A/HRC/25/63 7 February 2014.
  11. ^ Sengupta, Somini (December 22, 2014). "United Nations Security Council Examines North Korea's Human Rights". The New York Times. p. A12 (print edition Dec 23). Archived from the original on April 18, 2015. Retrieved Aug 20, 2015.
  12. ^ Sengupta, Somini (October 25, 2014). "Coalition Seeks to Send North Korea to International Court Over Rights Abuses". The New York Times. p. A6 (print edition Oct 26). Archived from the original on March 29, 2015. Retrieved Aug 20, 2015.
  13. ^ Kratz, Agatha (January 6, 2016). "North Korea: a role for the EU on human rights". European Council on Foreign Relations. London. Archived from the original on February 28, 2016. Retrieved Feb 27, 2015.
  14. ^ "Open Letter to Kim Jong Un". International Coalition to Stop Crimes against Humanity in North Korea, January 10, 2012. Archived from the original on February 3, 2015. Retrieved April 4, 2012.
  15. ^ "ICNK Launches Fresh Fight against Prison Camps". The Daily NK, March 3, 2012. Archived from the original on November 22, 2014. Retrieved April 4, 2012.
  16. ^ "About the ICNK: Member Organizations (descriptions and weblinks)". International Coalition to Stop Crimes against Humanity in North Korea. Archived from the original on July 20, 2012. Retrieved April 4, 2012.

External links[edit]