International Political Sociology (security studies)

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International Political Sociology is a critical approach within security studies. According to Didier Bigo an IPS approach to security argues that both security and insecurity are the result of an (in)securitization process based on a speech act calling for a politics of exception and a general frame linked to the existence of transnational bureaucracies and private agents managing insecurity that compete to frame security issues.[1] Bigo further argues that this (in)securitization process is embedded in the use of technology in every day practices. IPS approaches to security criticize of the characterization of security studies as a sub-discipline of international relations and the association of security with survival. IPS challenges the Copenhagen School's understanding of the securitization process arguing that securitization is not the result of a successful speech act but mundane bureaucratic decisions, use of technologies and Weberian routines of rationalization.[2] The International Political Sociology approach to security is particularly influenced by a Foucaultian reading of policing as a form of governmentality.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bigo, D. (2008), 'International Political Sociology' in Security Studies: An Introduction, P. Williams (ed), Routledge: Abingdon, pp. 116-128
  2. ^ Bigo, D. (2008), 'International Political Sociology' in Security Studies: An Introduction, P. Williams (ed), Routledge: Abingdon, p. 126

Further reading[edit]

  • CASE Collective, ‘Critical approaches to security in Europe: a networked manifesto’, Security Dialogue, 37(4) (2007): 443–487.