International VELUX Award for Students of Architecture

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The International VELUX Award challenges students of architecture to explore the theme of sunlight and daylight. The award is biennial and was first presented in 2004.

The award celebrates excellence in completed works on any scale from a small scale component to large urban contexts or abstract concepts and experimentation. The award is presented by VELUX in close cooperation with the International Union of Architects (UIA) and the European Association for Architectural Education (EAAE).[1]

Award theme[edit]

“Light of Tomorrow” is the theme of the International VELUX Award. The award wants to challenge the future of daylight in the built environment. The award contains no specific categories and is in no way restricted to the use of VELUX products.

Registration[edit]

The International VELUX Award 2012 opened for registration on 1 October 2011. Students register to participate in the award via the award website.

Any registered student of architecture – individual or team – from all over the world may participate in the award. The award wants to acknowledge not only the students but their teachers as well. Therefore, all students must be backed and granted submission by a teacher from a school of architecture.

Jury[edit]

The jury of the International VELUX Award comprises internationally recognized architects and other building professionals.

The jury of the 2012 Award comprised five jury members with different cultural backgrounds, nationalities and approaches to architecture. The jury met in Copenhagen in June 2012 to evaluate the year 2012 submitted projects and nominate the winners.

Jury members 2012[edit]

Alvaro Siza, Portugal, considered his country’s greatest living architect. Over the last five decades Álvaro Siza has assembled a body of work that ranks him among the greatest architects of his generation.

Brigitte Shim, Canada, has been a professor, since 1988, at the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design at the University of Toronto. Brigitte Shim is also a principal in Shim-Sutcliffe Architects, Toronto, formed in 1994.

Francis Kéré, Burkina Faso/Germany, self-employed planner and lecturer at the Technische Universität Berlin. The focus of Kéré’s work is climatic adaptation, low building costs and self-building.

Peter Stutchbury, Australia, is an Australian architect. He is principal of the firm Peter Stutchbury Architecture.

Per Arnold Andersen, Denmark, architect and head of Daylight, Energy and Indoor Climate Department in the VELUX Group. He has been working as practicing architect and planner for more than twenty years before he joined the VELUX Group in 1999. Since 2004 he has taken part in the planning of the International VELUX Award for Students of Architecture.

Jury members 2010[edit]

  • Magda Mostafa, Associate Professor, representing UIA on the jury and elected jury chairman at the jury meeting, Cairo, Egypt
  • Momoyo Kaijima, founding partner in Atelier Bow-Wow, Tokyo, Japan
  • Will Bruder, founding partner in Will Bruder+Partners, Arizona, USA
  • Nathalie de Vries, founding partner in MVRDV, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
  • Kim Herforth Nielsen, founding partner in 3XN, Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Stefano Musso, Professor, EAAE representative, Genoa, Italy
  • Jesper Salskov Jensen, VELUX representative on the jury, Denmark

History[edit]

The first International VELUX Award took place in 2004. 760 students from 194 schools in 34 countries in Europe registered, and 258 students from 106 schools in 27 countries submitted their projects. The international jury led by Glenn Murcutt selected three winners and eight honourable mentions, who were announced at the Award event held in Paris.

In 2006, the award went global – inviting students from all over the world to participate. The number of submissions more than doubled reaching 557 projects from 225 schools in 53 countries. The international jury led by Per Olaf Fjeld decided to award three winners and 17 honourable mentions, and they were all celebrated at the Award event at the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain.

In 2008, the award received 686 projects, representing 244 schools of architecture in 46 countries. The international jury led by jury chairman Hani Rashid of Asymptote Architecture decided to award three winners and eight honourable mentions, who were celebrated at the Pisani Palace in Venice in November 2008.

In 2010, the award represented more countries than ever before. There were 673 entries from 280 schools in 55 countries. The international jury led by jury chairman Magda Mostafa decided to award three winners and eight honourable mentions. They were celebrated at the award event on 6 October 2010 in La Rochelle, France.

Winners[edit]

The total prize money of the International VELUX Award is 30,000 Euros. The jury decides on the number of prize winners and honourable mentions.

In 2010 the jury appointed three prize winners and eight honourable mentions. Young-Gook Park, Kim Dea Hyun, Choi Jin Kyu and Kim Won Ill from Hanyang University, South Korea, won the first prize for their project Constellation of Light Field. Ma Xin, Wang Rui and Yang Meng from the Architecture School of Tianjin University, China, won the second prize for their project Condensation of Variational Sunlight Influences. Joe Wu from Delft University of Technology, TU Delft, the Netherlands, also won the second prize for his project Lightscape between gaps.

In 2008 the jury appointed three prize winners and eight honourable mentions. Reilly O’Neil Hogan from Cornell University, USA, won first prize for his project “Embodied Ephemerality”. Ruan Hau and Xiong Xing from Tsinghua University in Beijing won second prize for their project “Interface repairing – Light Festival. Dean Carlo MacGregor from Lusíada University in Lisbon, Portugal, won third prize for his project “Light has a body”.

In 2006 Louise Groenlund of Denmark won the International VELUX Award for her project ”A museum of photography”. Twenty winners and honourable mentions were announced at the Award event at the Guggenheim Bilbao in November 2006.

In 2004 the first prize went to Norwegian student Claes Heske Ekornås for his project “Light as matter”. In 2004, ten winners were announced at the Award event in Paris.

External links and sources[edit]

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